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IM INA HOSPITAL

 
 
farmerman
 
  10  
Reply Sun 18 Nov, 2018 12:45 pm
@Izzie,
It me again. He's doing as good as can be expected with all the damage he's sustained. He will have problems in the security line for international air travel what with all the matl hes now carrying.
Im going to the hospital now and Ill see about when I can expect his release , which Im hoping will still be tomorrow.
The bull that was posted earlier is not what we have. That's prime breeding stock .Most of those fellas have full time staffs. We took a small herd of 7 simmental (black, not brindle) and 4 red Dexters. We are already set up for Dexter cattle and longhair reds. The owner was cited for extreme cruelty and we had to develop a plan to care and bring em back. The first thing they needed done was the foot rot, severe foot rot in two cases. We've isolated them and got most of them taken care. This heifer was about 650 lb and was so frightened by the needles and hot knife that she just exploded in the "rack" of the bullpen. The old man , when the cow jumped up, grabbed an Amish kid who was in the pen with his father. His father just headed for the gate, not even knowing that his son was right in the path of the steer. So the old man just flung the kid at another Amishman who was out of the way and our Farmerman, just about made it up the gate and out. The heifer just crashed against his left leg and wherever the leg contacted the pipe of the rack, there was at least a fracture. I think he sustained about 4 separate breaks and two fractures. Now hes a hero among the Amish and all I've been doing is eating meals delivered by Amish families.

Ill keep in touch and Im hoping that hes back home by tomorrow .

He was grateful for your kind thoughts.
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Sun 18 Nov, 2018 01:01 pm
@farmerman,
Crisakes Farmerman has had some colorful and colossal clashes with critters, hasn’t he?!If it were me, I’d steer clear from now on! The stakes are pretty high.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Nov, 2018 07:26 pm
@farmerman,
Sure hope the fman is home soon and able to eat some of those excellent meals - and at least one of your good pies (we've heard a lot about your pies over the years).

Terrific that you guys were rescuing those Simmental. They are beautiful creatures. A former colleague's daughter recently graduated from ag college here in Canada and has started a tiny breeding herd - I think she's up to 3 heifers now. They can be lovely beasts. Sorry this one was frightened and freaked out on the fman.

Thank you for the updates. You're both part of our family here.
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Nov, 2018 07:32 pm
@farmerman,
Best wishes for a quick recovery.
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2018 12:23 am
@farmerman,
I always suspected he was a mensch. I don't know he was a hero, too.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2018 03:15 am
@farmerman,
Adding my healing thoughts and well wishes. Sounds like a hellofan ordeal. Happy to hear that no one else was injured, especially a young un.
farmerman
 
  4  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2018 11:47 am
@JPB,
Thank you all, and NO chai we do not own any stud bulls like the one you pictured. Those specimwns usually hve their own wait-staff. Ive know maNy a Simmy or Angus stud thats gone for a million bucks, (not in my price range).
Many of you thought we were "rescuing" these cattle for humane rasons and pet wishes. Thats only partly so. e will be claning up and clipping th Dexter Reds so they live unmolested amongst our others. The simmentals are all , after about n 18 month fattening program, going to auction to be sold as finishers.
In beef cattle, the workloads are generally broken up intp 1.Calves, 2"returned to farms', 3 Feeders, and 4 Finishers. Each previous purchase pays by eight and sells by weight, the final finished weight is then graded as to the quality of meat. These will probably all be sold finally as "utility" grade (which is lower class beef , in this case grass fed so there will be a bargain for a sharp eyyed butcher.
Im sorry if anyone is of the opinion that we run a "pet farm". ALL the animals must earn their keep. The Dexters that we keep, we raise for calves, who are sold to individual, usually, small farm operations.

The left leg i smooshed a bit above and below the knee. I woulda made it out if it were not for that dumb kid.
Ive been told that, with the collagen therapy and PT , I should only be in theBOOT for less than 7 weeks , after which Im to gradually go back to daily walks. LIFT NOTHING HEAVIER THAN A 5 LB bag of SUGAR for several months after Im out of the boot. So, it shouldnt interfere with skiing...(kidding).
Looks like my chrissmass shopping will be done as gift cards and over-the-computer. The only stores I like are art upplis and gun-marts. I think Ill wait a bit before I buy the Marlin-.45-70 "brush gun"


farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2018 11:48 am
@Ragman,
ifn we dont get roughed up a bit doing our lives, how do we know weve even lived?
farmerman
 
  4  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2018 11:50 am
@farmerman,
An I aint a hero, I hadda throw that damn kid outta the way so I could get out of the pen. HE was in my way.
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2018 11:52 am
@farmerman,
pain pill, diltiazem, and nappy time
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2018 12:20 pm
@farmerman,
Good to see you posting.

Better for the Simnentals to go on to be finishers without the pain of rotten feet. I've go no errrr beef with beef, gotta problem with people who don't treat their animals properly.

Dumb kid. maybe the little guy can come work for you - make sure you stay fed up while MsF keeps up with the work.
farmerman
 
  4  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2018 12:57 pm
@ehBeth,
we 'af 'elp mum. Little ELmer i doing work for us now, his dad has em cleaning pens and stalls. (his older brother can handle the 1050 JohnDeere it small enough for a kid and wide enough so they dont roll em)

I ws going to take a np but I hobbled out to the barn on m new aluminium crutches . They got the simmentals all crotched out, feet cleaned and dried and meds . The vet from New Bolton must have been over cause Ive got a list of **** to do on the cell phone.

Yeh, Im gonna be sure these heifers an steers are kept in best of health an have nice paddocks and dry stalls . Mrs F has driven the red dexters to be with our others and they are already settling up on whose in charge, according to Ms F.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  2  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2018 02:11 pm
@farmerman,
Can’t take you anywhere, Farmerman!
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2018 02:46 pm
@dlowan,
I was at home when this happened. In the barn, but at home.
The pain is down to just a dull ache in the muscles where I slammed into the fence pipes
dlowan
 
  2  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2018 06:17 pm
@farmerman,
dangerous beasts, these cows. For real!

So glad you are relatively ok
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2018 06:34 pm
@dlowan,
cows are gentle creatures, steers are dumb cows who are more like castradii. Anything that weighs 700 lb, and is splayed out on its back and decides it wants to leave, youd better be like a rodeo clown and lern the moves. I just didnt have the right moves and it was really all my own stupidity. I shoulda just tucked the kid under my arm and jumped for the gate. Yeh but maybe I would have landed on the kid and he weighed like 50 pounds and Im more like 180. He woulda been skwished if I tripped up and we both woulda got pranged by the cows ribs against the fence.
Once the cow was up, she just walked over to her hay and started eating
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2018 06:49 pm
@farmerman,
they're just dumb

years ago I was working a lot of envtl assessment

we'd go through herds to get to woodlots

they'd get interested and follow us

fine

til we were at the fence trying to get back out of their yard/field and they had an itch and didn't notice one of us was between the itchy spot and the fence

ouch <got really squished only once - learned to dance better after that>
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2018 07:50 pm
I knew a horse once't who used to crowd you. There was no malice, he would just crowd you. You would go to the corral and he would trot right up. So you'd climb on the gate, and push him away. You'd throw your leg over and get on the other side of the gate, and push him away. You'd get down and push him away. You wanted to be careful he didn't step on your feet, but it was just because he wanted to be right next to you. I think he was just lonely. If I could, I'd go by there, get into the corral with him, and then open the gate to the paddock. He'd run around for a while, very happy, then he'd come over and stand right next you. Best to get up on the fence and sit, so he wouldn't step on your feet.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2018 07:56 pm
@farmerman,
Oh I know they are gentle and generally don't mean to hurt...but a horse or cow who is spooked can do a lot of damage with no malice at all.

having been trodden on, knocked over, kicked and squished with no intent on the animal's part to hurt, know this well.

I enjoy interacting with cows...they are intensely curious, full of personality, have best friends and like to play.

farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Nov, 2018 08:46 pm
@dlowan,
and they never have bad breath.
0 Replies
 
 

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