38
   

IM INA HOSPITAL

 
 
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Sun 18 Mar, 2018 10:58 am
@ehBeth,
we bought a Komondoor, His name is CHUNK. Hes never ever gonna live in the house but hes only there as a herd dog. Hes got a good life but requires a lotta grooming on his "dreds" . So thats work.
Were still looking for a house dog and I think we will wind up with a rescue doggie. Its gonna need to have some collie or Shep in it.When Im stronger I got a bazillion things to do. Its amazing that when the word CANCER enters your day to day, you are forced to put many things on hold. I gotta small boat to finish. And I gotta get back to Buenos Aires to my mine boys.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Sun 18 Mar, 2018 11:04 am
   https://tse4.mm.bing.net/th?id=OIP.8c14NMQkbMupVvjKoXQxPQHaFY&w=289&h=207&c=7&o=5&dpr=1.45&pid=1.7

Chunk looks like the one on the right. Hes a dobre pup.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Mar, 2018 12:47 pm
@farmerman,
Yes, keep planning for the future.
farmerman
 
  4  
Reply Sun 18 Mar, 2018 02:09 pm
@roger,
Right now Im planning to go back to sleep for a few hours
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Mar, 2018 02:26 pm
@farmerman,
We had a golden retriever, and they're great dogs. He was the only dog we ever owned Wink
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Mar, 2018 05:34 pm
@farmerman,
I'm sorry to hear you're sick and glad to hear that you're on the mend. I know what the word "cancer" can do to your life.Yes, some stuff on hold. Stuff can wait. Be good to yourself.

Love the komondor. Say hi to Chunk for me.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Mar, 2018 05:41 pm
@Roberta,
We are gonna rename the dog. Chunk doesnt fit but its the name the breeder had on the tag. Ive heard that name used severl times in the last 2 months since we got the puppy.

Thanks, Im a member of the club wif you.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Mar, 2018 06:20 pm
I don’t know why I always felt a member of the family deserved a people name.

Family dogs have been Joe and Jack.

Interested to see what moniker sticks on former Chunk.

🙂
oralloy
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Mar, 2018 06:31 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
Im now free of it all. They used DNA mapping and have screwed with one gene that actually controls the chromophore and makes it go malignant.

That's good news.

Did you have your case analyzed by Watson (the IBM supercomputer)?
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Mar, 2018 06:48 pm
@farmerman,
That's one fancy looking guy. Working on the dreads will be uhhh work.

I met a new neighbour walking home from the pool today - Velvet, a very very young Pom/Husky x. First day with her new human family. Terrified of her immediate neighbour, Ruby, a 16 year old, blind, 9 pound terrier x.

Get yourself a house dog as soon as you can stand it.

Keep on with the good plannning.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 20 Mar, 2018 09:21 am
@ehBeth,
slight setback, but sorta moving forward. Tired of just lyin around watching the tube. I dont feel like reading nd cant get up the initiative to draw.

Now its snowing. **** **** ****!!



farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Mar, 2018 09:25 am
@oralloy,
Quote:
Did you have your case analyzed by Watson (the IBM supercomputer)?
naah, most onboard computers on the davinci's and other equipment are powerful enough to do gene sequencing especially when the genes are already well known.

This stuff is getting to be old hand and it seems that the next steps are integration of all stages of care
oralloy
 
  0  
Reply Tue 20 Mar, 2018 01:05 pm
@farmerman,
That's not what Watson does.

Watson takes a list of all your symptoms and finds new cutting edge treatments that your doctors probably haven't heard about.


Here's a transcript from a 60 Minutes show:
60 Minutes wrote:
Charlie Rose: To be on top of everything that's out there, all the trials that have taken place around the world, it seems like an incredible task--

Ned Sharpless: Well, yeah, it's r--

Charlie Rose: --for any one university, only one facility to do.

Ned Sharpless: Yeah, it's essentially undoable. And understand we have, sort of, 8,000 new research papers published every day. You know, no one has time to read 8,000 papers a day. So we found that we were deciding on therapy based on information that was always, in some cases, 12, 24 months out-of-date.

However, it's a task that's elementary for Watson.

Ned Sharpless: They taught Watson to read medical literature essentially in about a week.

Charlie Rose: Yeah.

Ned Sharpless: It was not very hard and then Watson read 25 million papers in about another week. And then, it also scanned the web for clinical trials open at other centers. And all of the sudden, we had this complete list that was, sort of, everything one needed to know.

Charlie Rose: Did this blow your mind?

Ned Sharpless: Oh, totally blew my mind.

Watson was proving itself to be a quick study. But, Dr. Sharpless needed further validation. He wanted to see if Watson could find the same genetic mutations that his team identified when they make treatment recommendations for cancer patients.

Ned Sharpless: We did an analysis of 1,000 patients, where the humans meeting in the Molecular Tumor Board-- doing the best that they could do, had made recommendations. So not at all a hypothetical exercise. These are real-world patients where we really conveyed information that could guide care. In 99 percent of those cases, Watson found the same the humans recommended. That was encouraging.

Charlie Rose: Did it encourage your confidence in Watson?

Ned Sharpless: Yeah, it was-- it was nice to see that-- well, it was also-- it encouraged my confidence in the humans, you know. Yeah. You know--

Charlie Rose: Yeah.

Ned Sharpless: But, the probably more exciting part about it is in 30 percent of patients Watson found something new. And so that's 300-plus people where Watson identified a treatment that a well-meaning, hard-working group of physicians hadn't found.

Charlie Rose: Because?

Ned Sharpless: The trial had opened two weeks earlier, a paper had come out in some journal no one had seen -- you know, a new therapy had become approved--

Charlie Rose: 30 percent though?

Ned Sharpless: We were very-- that part was disconcerting. Because I thought it was gonna be 5 perc--

Charlie Rose: Disconcerting that the Watson found--

Ned Sharpless: Yeah.

Charlie Rose: --30 percent?

Ned Sharpless: Yeah. These were real, you know, things that, by our own definition, we would've considered actionable had we known about it at the time of the diagnosis.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/60-minutes-artificial-intelligence-charlie-rose-robot-sophia/
oralloy
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 20 Mar, 2018 02:17 pm
@oralloy,
I believe this is the official page for information about having a cancer case analyzed by Watson:

http://www.questdiagnostics.com/home/patients/health-test-info/cancer/ibm-watson-genomics.html

I gather that it appears you are in the clear now. But if you ever have to get further cancer treatment you might want to keep it in mind.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  2  
Reply Tue 20 Mar, 2018 02:18 pm
@Lash,
Lash wrote:

I don’t know why I always felt a member of the family deserved a people name.

Family dogs have been Joe and Jack.

Interested to see what moniker sticks on former Chunk.

🙂


I feel the same. All my pets have had regular names
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Mar, 2018 03:02 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
Tired of just lyin around watching the tube. I dont feel like reading nd cant get up the initiative to draw.


the worst part of recovering
ready to do more but not ready to do more

keep on moving forward
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 20 Mar, 2018 03:59 pm
@ehBeth,
yaaah. First day of spring tomorrow nd Im gonna be watching TV looking at a snowstorm. At least Ive got my appetite back.
Mrs F cooked up some chicken pot pie for supper.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 20 Mar, 2018 04:06 pm
@chai2,
Quote:
I feel the same. All my pets have had regular names
. Look at it this way, these are more nicknames. AS a kid, my compadres always had friendly nicknames, like "Icepick", or "Drac".
DOgs with people names set too high a standard because the names we pick are always folks we like. My last catahoula "Ernie" was named for a farmer neighbor who was always shooting ground hogs and gathering em up for roasting.


"Curly" is coming up for the Komondoor followed by "Shemp" and "Marley".

When Im better and mostly healed, Im gonna run over to the Berks County Animal Rescue and try to find a rescue.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Mar, 2018 04:13 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
"Curly" is coming up for the Komondoor followed by "Shemp" and "Marley".


which one can you holler the best/loudest?
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Mar, 2018 04:18 pm
I have never bought a dog. About half were presents and the other half rescues. I used to think I had favorites among them, but today I recall them all with equal fondness. Rocky, my present dog, is a handful, but he keeps an old man on his toes, which is good.
0 Replies
 
 

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