8
   

I'll just entertain myself

 
 
Reply Fri 14 May, 2021 08:44 am
But you can join in if you like.

Yesterday as I opened up the gate, my dog saw something in the brush along the fence. Rocky is a shepherd/lab and quite good natured until he spots a varmint. Almost any species fits the definition, although he once nuzzled a loose pig at the fence. Then he becomes a ruthless killer. I hadn't a clue until after I got him home from the shelter and after we already bonded.

I did see something dark hiding in that growth, but it successfully hid from me before I determined what it could be. Then I forgot about it and my wife and I went grocery shopping. When we returned I shut the main gate to keep Rocky away from the street while unloading bags and a melon. It did not occur to me that the "varmint" still hid by the driveway.

I took in the first load and came back down the step in time to see Rocky next to the truck finishing off a wild duck. Poor thing must have injured a wing or something and had to look for refuge.

The thing about Rocky is, he never meets a human stranger. He loves us all. He might bark when somebody walks past the yard but if they approach the gate he is silent. The other day he was on the porch. He barked his "Open the door" bark. When I did so, he moved further out on the porch and looked to the neighbor's yard. Then went "Wf. Wf." He was alerting me she was out there near the fence where we usually stand to talk.

I will not make a list of his victims. Suffice to say, if it gets in the yard and he can catch it it's dead. But I never let him loose in the neighborhood, so he is limited in how many victims he gets.
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 May, 2021 08:49 am
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 May, 2021 09:13 am
@edgarblythe,
My Dad didn't like the music I listened to, but he loved, loved, loved Lloyd Price when he heard him sing "Personality".
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 May, 2021 09:15 am
@glitterbag,
I always bought Price's 45s. To me, even his weak songs were worth listening to.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 May, 2021 10:45 am
I switched my avatar to Thomas Paine because I admire that he lived his principles, principles I share. I ditched Roosevelt, whom I was honoring for the New Deal because without the work of Frances Perkins he might not have been that progressive. Plus, I always condemned his policy regarding the treatment of the Japanese during WWII.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 May, 2021 11:35 am
@edgarblythe,
Not thinking of a holiday in Lewes then?

He is the face on Lewes currency, or was, I don’t know if it’s still going, but the Lewes pound was a scheme to get people shopping locally

Paine is probably Lewes most famous son.

They go a bit mad for fireworks on Bonfire Night, a parade of effigies of contemporary hate figures all to be set on fire.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 May, 2021 12:26 pm
It has been a long time since I read much about Paine. My interest in him mostly centers on the revolutions and his work for free democratic society.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 May, 2021 12:31 pm
@edgarblythe,
He wasn’t famous for coming from Lewes after all.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Fri 14 May, 2021 12:32 pm
Thomas Paine is the only Founder without a gravesite. The story of his remains reflect the collossal life and works of Paine himself and his legacy. He was first buried in New Rochelle, NY on his farm, after the Quakers refused him, in a town very hostile to him. A Paine admirer, William Cobbett, himself a democratic advocate from England, saw the disrespect Paine received where he was buried and decided to dig him up and take him to England to help spur the movement for democracy there. He did that in 1819. Over the years, the bones were split up; there were unverified rumors that some of the bones were cut into buttons and sold to finance the revolution (but more buttons were sold than could have come from any 10 bodies). There are rumors of a leg bone in the wall of a tavern in England, some pieces were claimed in Europe, and it is probable that the skull has been located in Wales (and is now in Australia) but no testing has yet confirmed this. We do know that a piece of the brain, and hair locks, from the body were secured by our Association. But on the whole, Paine was scattered throughout the world and has no grave. Some believe this is fitting to the man's legacy, but Paine wanted specific gravesite arrangements which were never met. Our Association hopes to recreate this gravesite where he wanted it in the future with the few remains that exist. For full details see the article here.
http://thomaspaine.org/aboutpaine/where-are-paine-s-remains-and-does-he-have-a-gravesite.html
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 May, 2021 01:21 pm
@edgarblythe,
Great story and thanks for sharing.

Lloyd said, “...and I still can’t sing!”
Yeah, Riiiight!
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 May, 2021 01:23 pm
@Ragman,
My favorite by him was Where were you on our Wedding Day.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 May, 2021 01:24 pm
@edgarblythe,
Looking for it now to see if I remember.

{edit: oh yeah. Wow, very cool. I remember it now}
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 May, 2021 01:38 pm
@Ragman,
I used to adopt new artists frequently to follow closely. Bought all their records if I could. Today only about 30 random 45s remain of my collection.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Fri 14 May, 2021 01:45 pm
Pigs And Rodents Can Breathe Through Their Butts, And This Could Be a Vital Discovery
https://www.sciencealert.com/pigs-and-rodents-can-breathe-through-their-butts-apparently
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Fri 14 May, 2021 05:29 pm
There existed for a time, in a location not known to the rest of us, a ring of five faces, each with a countenance settled to fully view the others, but with one turned just slightly akilter, yet still able to look upon all of the other faces. So arranged by a puckish whim of nature when a cargo of severed heads tumbled off a donkey cart and rolled away from the path down a long slope. They came to rest on a field of short, deeply soft, clover. That same nature that placed them there deemed that none had died, at least for now. And so they were settled, looking around with eyes wild with terror. The faces blinked in disbelief, trading stares and simply blinking at one another, amazed to be like a miniature Easter Island of balanced heads. None believed their individual sparks of intelligence would continue to burn for very long. For a time they were still. Then the flooding memories of recent horror consumed them. Tears of anger and self-pity. Moans of fear. Screams of agony. The need to retch but no retching mechanism extant. No one blamed any of the others for choices of expressions against the outrage of being beheaded by a vengeful society. Throughout the day it lasted, then all during the night residual groaning. As the day burst upon them, almost like on-switching a light bulb, they were mostly cried out. By degrees, their terror eased in the sweet morning air. And they took stock and began to communicate with looks and expressions. A few gave the others encouraging half-smiles. As yet no one ventured to speak. Then a butterfly settled on a young feminine nose. Her eyes crossed, to look at it.

“It’s the clover,” an older male voice offered. “There are many butterflies here. A few bees, also.”

This particular head with full growth white hair on it had belonged to A, a journalist/essayist. Any who recognized him in later life would call A a radical. His turn to feel the bite of the blade had been almost universally anticipated.

The butterfly had taken a rest upon the nose tip that had been a part of R, paramour to a man whose head balanced on the lush greenness two places away. R had always worn her flaxen tresses nearly waist long. As a prisoner, she had had it hacked until it was ragged and short. There was a scabbed over gash caused by the reckless actions of the man wielding the shears. Her gaze rested on the head that had spoken to her; yet there seemed nothing to say.

The head that we will henceforth call A commented on her eyes, telling her the poets wrote sonnets to such eyes as hers.

R said nothing, still. It was evident in her expression the belief that men only serve compliments to pretty females when strategizing control over them. Her eyes sought out Z, her former lover for an instant.

No interest was returned, for Z to all intents and purposes no longer knew her. She had understood the man all too well for it to bother her as her gaze randomly swung to and locked on a certain M.

To M, the unwavering stare from a single set of eyes constituted an audience, to which he could not resist responding. “I offered them pearls, those swine,” he said.

M looked about to see if his outburst had gotten the attention of the rest of the group. Their paused faces, though their eyes looked away, told him they were listening. “I gave millions of people hope,” he said. “I had more followers than anybody.”

“We all know about you,” Z said. “Nobody deserves to be here more than you.”

M regarded his accuser with scorn. “Trafficker. Flesh merchant. You will burn in the bowels of hell. The Lord will see to that.”

Fleeting amusement crossed through Z’s features. He dismissed M from his thoughts. Shortly, he closed his eyes and could correctly be deemed to be close to napping. It had long been a habit with him to sleep by day while pursuing most activities in the deepest night. He felt no impetus to change.

A had noted that the head akilter had not as yet acknowledged the group. His curiosity grew after he determined it to be female and that she concentrated her attention solely on what could be seen of the world from that very confined vantage point.

“Are the butterflies gone?” R asked, breaking into his musing.

“I’m afraid so,” he said. “However, I do see a crow in the distance, hopping, and driving its beak into the clover. Now it has flown. A good thing in my book. I wouldn’t want something like that getting close.”

“I’m afraid,” she said. “Now we’re half dead I would like to get it over without further pain.”

A backed out of their talk, finding it distressful; also cutting it short because he was eager to focus his attention on the other woman, made interesting because mysterious.

Provoked by his undisguised curiosity, the akilter woman’s features froze, her eyes holding a steady gaze to her front. A felt unapologetic. He brashly studied her features, which were plain, yet strong, her eyes that were deep and shadowed. That skin tone and hair could put her in multiple ethnic groups. “What is your name?” he said.

She slowly trained the trajectory of her gaze on his face. “You are A,” she said.

“Everyone knows me. I don’t recognize you,” he said.

“I taught in a top university,” she said without responding to A’s request. “I researched the material and taught the truth.”

“As you should have done,” he said.

“My work often contradicted the texts we were expected to follow,” she said. “A few students reported me. At first, the administration tried to support me. In the end, they joined with the government to demand I retract certain information. I refused. I was imprisoned. Still, I refused.”

“Maybe,” A said, “you ought to have compromised just a little.”

Her sigh said more than any words. Her renewed silence somehow cut A, set him to review his own transgressions. A's transgressions were tolerated until the wrong persons assumed legal power. After that, no amount of backtracking could erase the bruising untruths contained in the words he had written. He mentally shrugged. “So it goes -”

R was singing to console herself. Her voice was once deep, sultry, but no longer resonated. A didn’t know any songs and didn’t care.

M had been muttering to himself since the exchange with Z. He saw A looking around. “Let me tell you where you’ve gone wrong,” he said in the best pitchman’s voice.

“Shut up,” said Z. “I’m sleeping.”

The three men began haranguing one another, causing M to sing ever louder. They didn’t notice that the head akilter had gone still and her eyes semi-closed. When A finally noticed it was because that head had rolled forward, leaving the face to rest in the soft greenness.
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Fri 14 May, 2021 10:06 pm
I am a big fan of western movies and novels. I love stuff like Quigley Down Under, High Noon and The Good The Bad and The Ugly. But I am fussy about westerns just as I am fussy about all genres. I thought I would present a list of popular westerns that do little to nothing for me.
1. Once Upon a Time in the West
2. The Magnificent Seven
3. How the West Was Won
4. The Wild Bunch
Joeblow
 
  2  
Reply Sat 15 May, 2021 05:20 am
@edgarblythe,
Love it. Love the thread. Following along.
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sat 15 May, 2021 05:36 am
@Joeblow,
Good morning. Thank you.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 May, 2021 05:58 am
@edgarblythe,
Doing the same for other movies. I was not so impressed with the following movies.
1. The Godfather - the mindset of the characters finally made me give it up and go cut the yard.
2. The Shawshank Redemption - Was an ordinary movie about prison for a time, but eventually became boring.
3. Pulp Fiction - hated the characters and the mindset behind the writing.
4. The Shining - I hate horror films anyway, but Nicholson's character was too much like my abusive stepfather.
5. Exorcism - I don't respect exorcisms from the start. The film was too repulsive to watch all.
snood
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 May, 2021 08:08 am
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

I am a big fan of western movies and novels. I love stuff like Quigley Down Under, High Noon and The Good The Bad and The Ugly. But I am fussy about westerns just as I am fussy about all genres. I thought I would present a list of popular westerns that do little to nothing for me.
1. Once Upon a Time in the West
2. The Magnificent Seven
3. How the West Was Won
4. The Wild Bunch



I don’t think I would have enjoyed having coffee with the man, but three of John Wayne’s movies are on my favorite westerns list - The Cowboys, True Grit and The Shootist.

Here are some others:
Open Range
Tombstone
Pale Rider
Buck and the Preacher
Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
The Magnificent Seven (1960 version)
 

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