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Bernie Sanders 2020

 
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Nov, 2019 06:34 pm
@engineer,
I am referring to TYT, not anybody else.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Tue 12 Nov, 2019 06:35 pm
@Lash,
I saw it but still am not convinced she will follow through. It would throw the party into total chaos.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Nov, 2019 10:34 am
How to Fight Antisemitism
November 11, 2019 Posted byBernie Sanders
ON OCTOBER 27TH, we marked one year since the worst antisemitic attack in our country’s history, when a white nationalist walked into the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh and murdered 11 people and injured six others. The murderer acted on a twisted belief that Jews were part of a nefarious plot to undermine white America—a plot to assist in the “invasion” of the United States by a caravan of migrants from Latin America. This vicious lie about an “invasion” had been repeated endlessly in right-wing media, on Fox News, across the internet, and, most disgracefully, by the president of the United States.

Yes, President Donald Trump’s own words helped inspire the worst act of antisemitic violence in American history.

The threat of antisemitism is not some abstract idea to me. It is very personal. It destroyed a large part of my family. I am not someone who spends a lot of time talking about my personal background because I believe political leaders should focus their attention on a vision and agenda for others, rather than themselves. But I also appreciate that it’s important to talk about how our backgrounds have informed our ideas, our principles, and our values.

I am a proud Jewish American. My father emigrated from Poland to the United States in 1921 at the age of 17 to escape the poverty and widespread antisemitism of his home country. Those in his family who remained in Poland after Hitler came to power were murdered by the Nazis. I know very well where white supremacist politics leads, and what can happen when people do not speak up against it.

Antisemitism is rising in this country. According to the FBI, hate crimes against Jews rose by more than a third in 2017 and accounted for 58% of all religion-based hate crimes in America. A total of 938 hate crimes were committed against Jews in 2017, up from 684 in 2016. The New York Police Department reported in September that antisemitic hate crimes in New York City have risen by more than 63% in 2019 and make up more than half of all reported hate crimes. Just last week, on November 4th, we learned that federal authorities had arrested a man in Colorado they believe was involved in a plot to bomb one of the state’s oldest synagogues.

This wave of violence is the result of a dangerous political ideology that targets Jews and anyone who does not fit a narrow vision of a whites-only America. We have to be clear that while antisemitism is a threat to Jews everywhere, it is also a threat to democratic governance itself. The antisemites who marched in Charlottesville don’t just hate Jews. They hate the idea of multiracial democracy. They hate the idea of political equality. They hate immigrants, people of color, LGBTQ people, women, and anyone else who stands in the way of a whites-only America. They accuse Jews of coordinating a massive attack on white people worldwide, using people of color and other marginalized groups to do their dirty work.

This is the conspiracy theory that drove the Pittsburgh murderer—that Jews are conspiring to bring immigrants into the country to “replace” Americans. And it is important to understand that that is what antisemitism is: a conspiracy theory that a secretly powerful minority exercises control over society. Like other forms of bigotry—racism, sexism, homophobia—antisemitism is used by the right to divide people from one another and prevent us from fighting together for a shared future of equality, peace, prosperity, and environmental justice. So I want to say as clearly as I possibly can: We will confront this hatred, do exactly the opposite of what Trump is doing and embrace our differences to bring people together.

Opposing antisemitism is a core value of progressivism. So it’s very troubling to me that we are also seeing accusations of antisemitism used as a cynical political weapon against progressives. One of the most dangerous things Trump has done is to divide Americans by using false allegations of antisemitism, mostly regarding the US–Israel relationship. We should be very clear that it is not antisemitic to criticize the policies of the Israeli government.

I have a connection to Israel going back many years. In 1963, I lived on a kibbutz near Haifa. It was there that I saw and experienced for myself many of the progressive values upon which Israel was founded. I think it is very important for everyone, but particularly for progressives, to acknowledge the enormous achievement of establishing a democratic homeland for the Jewish people after centuries of displacement and persecution.

We must also be honest about this: The founding of Israel is understood by another people in the land of Palestine as the cause of their painful displacement. And just as Palestinians should recognize the just claims of Israeli Jews, supporters of Israel must understand why Palestinians view Israel’s creation as they do. Acknowledging these realities does not “delegitimize” Israel any more than acknowledging the sober facts of America’s own founding delegitimizes the United States. It is a necessary step of truth and reconciliation in order to address the inequalities that continue to exist in our respective societies.

It is true that some criticism of Israel can cross the line into antisemitism, especially when it denies the right of self-determination to Jews, or when it plays into conspiracy theories about outsized Jewish power. I will always call out antisemitism when I see it. My ancestors would expect no less of me. As president, I will strengthen both domestic and international efforts to combat this hatred. I will direct the Justice Department to prioritize the fight against white nationalist violence. I will not wait two years to appoint a Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism, as Trump did; I will appoint one immediately. I will also rejoin the United Nations Human Rights Council, which Trump withdrew from. The United States should not be sitting on the sidelines on these important issues at the UN; we should be at the table helping to shape an international human rights agenda that combats all forms of bigotry and discrimination.

When I look at the Middle East, I see Israel as having the capacity to contribute to peace and prosperity for the entire region, yet unable to achieve this in part because of its unresolved conflict with the Palestinians. And I see a Palestinian people yearning to make their contribution—and with so much to offer—yet crushed underneath a military occupation now over a half-century old, creating a daily reality of pain, humiliation, and resentment.

Ending that occupation and enabling the Palestinians to have self-determination in an independent, democratic, economically viable state of their own is in the best interests of the United States, Israel, the Palestinians, and the region. My pride and admiration for Israel lives alongside my support for Palestinian freedom and independence. I reject the notion that there is any contradiction there. The forces fomenting antisemitism are the forces arrayed against oppressed people around the world, including Palestinians; the struggle against antisemitism is also the struggle for Palestinian freedom. I stand in solidarity with my friends in Israel, in Palestine, and around the world who are trying to resolve conflict, diminish hatred, and promote dialogue, cooperation, and understanding.

We need this solidarity desperately now. All over the world—in Russia, in India, in Brazil, in Hungary, in Israel, and elsewhere—we see the rise of a divisive and destructive form of politics. We see intolerant, authoritarian political leaders attacking the very foundations of democratic societies. These leaders exploit people’s fears by amplifying resentments, stoking intolerance and inciting hatred against ethnic and religious minorities, fanning hostility toward democratic norms and a free press, and promoting constant paranoia about foreign plots. We see this very clearly in our own country. It is coming from the highest level of our government. It is coming from Donald Trump’s tweets, and from his own mouth.

As a people who have experienced oppression and persecution for hundreds of years, we understand the danger. But we also have a tradition that points the way forward. I am a proud member of the tradition of Jewish social justice. And I am so inspired when I see so many Jewish people picking up this banner, especially the younger generation of Jews, who are helping to lead a revival of progressive values in our country. They see the fight against antisemitism and for Jewish liberation as connected to the fight for the liberation of oppressed people around the world. They are part of a broad coalition of activists from many different backgrounds who believe very deeply, as I always have, that we are all in this together.


Bernie Sanders is a United States senator from Vermont and a candidate in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary.
Real Music
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Nov, 2019 07:57 pm

Bernie Sanders unveils his new 'Medicare for All' plan.

Published April 10, 2018

https://able2know.org/topic/506157-1
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sun 17 Nov, 2019 12:23 am
CJ Berina for Congress
@CJ4Congress2020
·
12m
California Young Dems just endorsed Bernie Sanders for President
0 Replies
 
Sturgis
 
  2  
Reply Sun 17 Nov, 2019 04:27 pm
I'd like to advise the folks clamoring for Bernie Sanders to look at the actual comments from all over the country and from voters in all and brackets.

The vast majority are not comfy-womfy with Senator Sanders and his wild ideas. Even many who are, also are aware that he would be hard pressed to find support in both Houses (or even just one) to get anything he suggests enacted.

Need more? Examine the track records of recent Democrat Gubernatorial winners including Edwards of Louisiana.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Nov, 2019 04:36 pm
@Sturgis,
I disagree with you. He is surging just now, despite the negative press articles from those who oppose him.
Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Nov, 2019 04:42 pm
@edgarblythe,
Where?
the only recent surges have been from Buttigieg.

Sanders has been rather stagnant.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Nov, 2019 04:45 pm
@Sturgis,
You just don't read the same media as I. I don't for a moment believe Buttigieg has suddenly started polling that much. His campaign has been like a schooner in high weeds all along and suddenly he is the leader? Fake poll results.
Lash
 
  2  
Reply Sun 17 Nov, 2019 04:46 pm
@Sturgis,
JFK told the country we needed universal healthcare in the 60s.
Hillary Clinton gave some version a go in the 90s.
Bernie’s been on board since he’s been in public service.

It is neither wild nor unpopular.

It is smart and it is time.

https://youtu.be/14A1zxaHpD8
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sun 17 Nov, 2019 04:49 pm
@Lash,
Roosevelt planned to push for universal health care also.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Nov, 2019 05:29 pm
@edgarblythe,
And stack the USSC and intern Japanese-American citizens
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  3  
Reply Sun 17 Nov, 2019 09:13 pm
Ilhan Omar
@IlhanMN
·
3h
This is not ok or necessary 🤦🏽‍♀️
Quote Tweet

Ryan Grim
@ryangrim
· 11h
The Buttigieg campaign using a stock photo of a Kenyan woman for its Douglass Plan for Black America is now news in Kenya.

The woman in the photo reached out to me very confused. One story here: https://citizentv.co.ke/news/u-s-firm-goofs-using-photo-of-kenyan-woman-for-buttigieg-2020-campaign-293860/
Show this thread
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  3  
Reply Sun 17 Nov, 2019 09:29 pm
@edgarblythe,
Here are all the Iowa polls.

That last poll with Buttigieg at 25% is a bit of an outlier in the ways that polls sometimes get skewed by random variation, but Buttigieg isn't "suddenly" posting numbers in the 20-25% range, he hit 20% for the first time in mid October, and polled the highest of all candidates in two of the last three polls taken, both by top rated pollsters. Looks like Iowa is going to come down to Buttigieg and Warren.

More interesting is New Hampshire which should be Sanders country with Warren in the mix. While not the top pollsters, both the most recent polls show Buttigeig gaining significant strength and that Quinnipiac University polls was a large sample size poll. Given the headwinds against him there, a solid performance plus a win in Iowa would get him past a likely dismal showing in South Carolina.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  3  
Reply Mon 18 Nov, 2019 11:21 am
beth, a real human
@bourgeoisalien
·
3m
To people who say Bernie's goals are unrealistic and nothing will get passed,

What do you think Pete, Warren, or anyone can get passed with the GOP Jesus rides a dinosaur party?

Right. Nothing.

Bernie's the only one who knows we need a revolution. It's the only way forward.
blatham
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Nov, 2019 11:49 am
@edgarblythe,
Quote:
beth, a real human
@bourgeoisalien
As the research data I posted two days ago showed, there is at least a 1 in 5 chance this is a bot. But I like the "beth, a real human" touch. It inspires confidence.
Quote:
Bernie's the only one who knows we need a revolution.
Like "Make America Great Again", this isn't a plan or strategy or even a rational notion of a way forward. It's a marketing slogan.

edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Nov, 2019 01:40 pm
@blatham,
So if a bot tells the truth, we are being manipulated. Shittttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttt
blatham
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Nov, 2019 02:04 pm
@edgarblythe,
Quote:
So if a bot tells the truth
And what are the chances of that? Do you have some notion that botnets (pretending to be real people but with true authorship/sourcing disguised) are set up by the good guys so as to inform others of the truth of things?
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Nov, 2019 03:14 pm
@blatham,
I react to the statement. If it's true or I judge it so, what do I care who said it. Am I supposed to go, "Ooh, I think a Russian may have said that. I guess I can't believe it now. I am just a Republican."
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Nov, 2019 04:43 pm
@blatham,
She’s laughing at you. We’re disgusted by this knee-jerk bot talk about everyone who disagrees with you—so a lot of progressives mock it. You’re outrageously out of touch.

I’ve talked to her in DMs.

She’s a progressive.
0 Replies
 
 

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