29
   

Rising fascism in the US

 
 
neptuneblue
 
  2  
Reply Sun 27 Nov, 2022 09:23 pm
@Brandon9000,
Ok, I'll play your game:

From the article I posted earlier,
Quote:
Asked in an interview with Maria Bartiromo on Fox Business in May about the possibility that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi could assume the presidency if Trump and Vice President Mike Pence were to fall ill, the president scoffed at the idea.

"We'll keep our vice president very healthy and I'll stay healthy," he said. "Never going to happen."

In August, talking about masks, he said, "Maybe they’re great, and maybe they’re just good. Maybe they’re not so good.”

In a White House briefing just last month, Trump was asked why he doesn't wear a mask to set an example, instead of encouraging supporters who view rules requiring masks as a violation of personal freedom.

Once again, he mocked Biden.

"Well, I'm tested, and I'm sometimes surprised when I see somebody sitting and -- like, with Joe. Joe feels very safe in a mask. I don't know, maybe he doesn't want to expose his face," Trump said on Sept. 16. "There's no reason for him to have masks on."

"We get tested -- I'm tested. I have people tested. When people come into the Oval Office, it's like a big deal. No matter who they are -- if they're heads of countries, they all get tested. So I'm in sort of a different position. And maybe if I wasn't in that position, I'd be wearing it more," he continued.


So, Trump specifically stated he doesn't wear a mask because he's tested and so are the people around him. And he contracted Covid. Maybe that could have been avoided if he would have been wearing a mask at work.
Lash
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2022 04:56 am
@Frank Apisa,
That is precisely my point.

They made a myriad of unintentional and intentional mistatements, but THEIR errors, miscalculations, and lies were protected speech, while others’ were reason for censorship, government scrutiny, job loss, and social media ban.
hightor
 
  3  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2022 05:14 am
@Lash,
Quote:
They made a myriad of unintentional and intentional mistatements...

Which they corrected as new information became available. (I'd hesitate to describe it as a "myriad".) How many promoters of Ivermectin as a covid treatment have admitted they were mistaken? Have the producers of "Plandemic" apologized for the inaccuracies in their "documentary"?
Quote:
...but THEIR errors, miscalculations, and lies were protected speech...

Only because they didn't stray outside their areas of expertise. If Fauci or any of the other CDC officials started pushing hydrochloroquine as a covid treatment or denying the effectiveness of social distancing they would have been reprimanded.
Quote:
...while others’ were reason for censorship, government scrutiny, job loss, and social media ban.

Some specific examples would be helpful. What social media voices were "banned" by anyone other than the media companies themselves in response to a threatened loss of advertising? Who lost their job? Who was "censored"?
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2022 06:20 am
A lot of people on social media were censured, censored, and banned temporarily and permanently for arguing with the government narrative on vaccines, and for disputing numbers and data methodology used by the CDC, and accusing the CDC of being manipulated by the Trump and Biden administrations, for a few examples.

People who I am associated with across several platforms and I experienced these unwarranted intrusions into our interactions.

Plenty of law enforcement, teachers, school support staff, and medical personnel who didn’t feel comfortable getting vaxxed were fired.
Lash
 
  0  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2022 06:41 am
https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2022/11/28/media/shanghai-journalist-bbc-arrested-china-hnk-intl/index.html

(The US is moving more toward the authoritarian China model.)

Edward Lawrence, a journalist at the BBC, was arrested by police in Shanghai at the scene of protests on Sunday night, according to the BBC and as captured on what appears to be mobile phone footage of the arrest.

While he has since been released, a BBC spokesperson has expressed extreme concern about his treatment, saying he was "beaten and kicked by the police."

Protests have erupted across China in a rare show of dissent against the ruling Communist Party, sparked by anger over the country's increasingly costly zero-Covid policy.

Among the thousands of protesters, hundreds have even called for the removal of Chinese leader Xi Jinping, who for nearly three years has overseen a strategy of mass-testing, brute-force lockdowns, enforced quarantine and digital tracking that has come at a devastating human and economic cost.

The BBC statement reads in full: "The BBC is extremely concerned about the treatment of our journalist Ed Lawrence, who was arrested and handcuffed while covering the protests in Shanghai. He was held for several hours before being released. During his arrest, he was beaten and kicked by the police. This happened while he was working as an accredited journalist."

The statement continues, "It is very worrying that one of our journalists was attacked in this way whilst carrying out his duties. We have had no official explanation or apology from the Chinese authorities, beyond a claim by the officials who later released him that they had arrested him for his own good in case he caught Covid from the crowd. We do not consider this a credible explanation."

UK expresses 'considerable concern'

At a regular press briefing Monday, China's foreign ministry spokesperson Zhao Lijian acknowledged the detention of Lawrence, but claimed that he did not identify himself as a journalist before he was led away by police.

"China always welcomes foreign journalists to report in the country in accordance with the law and has provided lots of assistance," Zhao said. "At the same time, foreign journalists should comply with Chinese regulations when they are reporting in China."

Public protest is exceedingly rare in China, where the Communist Party has tightened its grip on all aspects of life, launched a sweeping crackdown on dissent, wiped out much of civil society and built a high-tech surveillance state.

At least two clips of the arrest were posted online by a Twitter user who says they witnessed the scene. One clip, filmed from above, shows at least four police officers standing over a handcuffed man whose face is obscured.

In a second clip of a man wearing the same clothing, Lawrence's face is clearly identifiable, as police quickly led him away, and then shouts, "Call the consulate now."

The witness who shared the videos said they saw the journalist get "sieged and dragged to the ground by several cops."

It is unclear what happened in the lead-up to Lawrence's arrest. The video available online begins with his arrest and does not show what happened prior.

In an interview with Sky News on Monday, the UK government called Lawrence's arrest a "considerable concern."

"There can be absolutely no excuse whatsoever for a journalist that was simply covering the process going on for being beaten by police," said UK Business Secretary Grant Shapps.

Swiss TV journalist detained

Lawrence wasn't the only foreign journalist detained by Chinese police on Sunday. Michael Peuker, China correspondent for Swiss broadcaster RTS, was also briefly detained while reporting live from a protest in Shanghai, RTS said.

"The tension is at its peak here. As a proof, I am now surrounded by three police officers, I will be taken to the police station after this live hit," Peuker said on air. "I will leave you now and go to the police station," he added.

Peuker said on Twitter that he was released moments later.
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2022 06:46 am
@Lash,
Quote:
A lot of people on social media were censured, censored, and banned temporarily and permanently for arguing with the government narrative on vaccines, and for disputing numbers and data methodology used by the CDC, and accusing the CDC of being manipulated by the Trump and Biden administrations, for a few examples.

These were people on media sites owned by private companies, right? These companies can set their own terms of use.
Quote:
People who I am associated with across several platforms and I experienced these unwarranted intrusions into our interactions.

What "unwarranted intrusions" are you talking about? It's difficult to understand where you're coming from here. Most platforms have some sort of content policy. Enforcement of those policies isn't government censorship, it's part of the user agreement with the site.
Quote:
Plenty of law enforcement, teachers, school support staff, and medical personnel who didn’t feel comfortable getting vaxxed were fired.

They didn't get fired because they felt uncomfortable – they got canned because they refused to get vaccinated when it was a condition of their continued employment. Were you fired for refusing to get vaccinated or something? I'm trying to understand why you feel this situation is so intolerable and why you connect it to "fascism"..
bobsal u1553115
 
  3  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2022 06:48 am
@Lash,
RIVERSIDE, CA — After days of speculation, the Riverside Police Department released details Sunday night about a triple homicide that occurred over the long holiday weekend — including information about the alleged killer who was a law enforcement officer.

https://img-s-msn-com.akamaized.net/tenant/amp/entityid/AA14CZ6L.img?w=768&h=576&m=6&x=335&y=236&s=341&d=341



Austin Lee Edwards, 28, of North Chesterfield, Va., killed three people in Riverside before he was shot and killed Saturday afternoon during a gun battle with San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department deputies, Riverside police confirmed.

Edwards worked for the Virginia State Police and was recently employed at the Washington County Sheriff’s Office in Virginia, according to Riverside police.

The lawman was being sought in the deaths of Mark Winek, 69, his wife, Sharie Winek, 65, and their daughter, Brooke Winek, 38. Their bodies were discovered shortly after 11 a.m. Saturday when firefighters were called about a blaze at the family home in the 11200 block of Price Court, in the La Sierra South neighborhood of Riverside. The three family members were found dead in the home's entryway, according to police.

The cause and manner of their deaths are still pending.

Detectives determined Edwards made the journey from Virginia to see Brooke Winek's teen daughter, whose identity was not released. He and the juvenile met through an online platform, and he lured her by pretending to be someone different than who he was, according to police. The deceptive practice is known as "catfishing."

Edwards cultivated the online relationship and got the teen to reveal personal information about herself — including where she lived.

When he finally arrived at Price Court, he parked his red Kia Soul in a neighbor’s driveway and walked to the girl’s home, police reported.

How Edwards gained entry into the family residence is unclear, but police believe that at some point he killed the girl's grandparents and mother and drove away with his intended target — the teenager.

At least one phone call was made to police late Saturday morning about the girl who "appeared distressed" while getting into Edwards' vehicle, according to the Riverside PD report.

Minutes later, more calls came in about a fire burning at the Winek home, which led to the grisly discovery by fire crews.

The three bodies were pulled outside "where it was determined they were victims of an apparent homicide," according to police.

The blaze was quelled and, while it continues to be under investigation, it appeared to be "intentionally ignited," police reported.

A description of the red Kia Soul was broadcast to law enforcement agencies and a manhunt began.

By Saturday afternoon, Edwards and the teen were spotted in the Kia nearly 200 miles away in the unincorporated area of Kelso, in San Bernardino County's Mojave National Preserve. The desolate desert spot is located about 86 miles northwest of Needles.

Rather than surrender to San Bernardino County sheriff's deputies, Edwards allegedly led a chase and got into a gun battle with the law enforcement officers. He shot at a SWAT vehicle several times before losing control of the Kia and veering off road, Riverside police reported.

The teen got out of the Kia and "was rescued by deputies"; she was unharmed, according to police.

Edwards allegedly "pointed a gun" at a sheriff’s helicopter, which is when deputies shot and killed the lawman.

The San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department previously reported that the gunfire and subsequent killing took place in Needles.

After questioning, the girl was eventually placed into protective custody of the Riverside County Department of Public Social Services, police reported.

“Our hearts go out to the Winek family and their loved ones during this time of tremendous grief, as this is a tragedy for all Riversiders,” Riverside Police Chief Larry Gonzalez said in a released statement. “This is yet another horrific reminder of the predators existing online who prey on our children. If you’ve already had a conversation with your kids on how to be safe online and on social media, have it again. If not, start it now to better protect them.”

A vigil for the family was held Saturday evening in Riverside.

"I just want everyone to know how loving they were. They don't deserve this. I'm not eating. I'm not sleeping. It just hit me very, very hard," Bonnie Davis, who said she has lived next door to the Wineks for two decades, told ABC7. "They were just that type of people that you would just never wake up to think that you would hear this of them."

A GoFundMe campaign set up for the Wineks had raised nearly $25,000 as of Sunday night.

The GoFundMe page describes Mark Winek as "a loving Father, Grandfather, Uncle, Brother, and Coach at Arlington High School [in Riverside];" Marie Winek as "a sweet and caring Mother, Grandmother, Sister, and Aunt who cherished spending time with her family;" and "Brooke Winek was a beloved single mother with the biggest heart."

The page also said Brooke Winek "found her most immense joy in following her daughter in the Color Guard at Arlington High School."

Anyone with additional and relevant information about the case is asked to contact Detective Josh Ontko at 951-353-7135 or [email protected], or Detective Bryan Galbreath at 951-353-7105 or [email protected].
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  3  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2022 07:00 am
@Lash,
Quote:
(The US is moving more toward the authoritarian China model.)

Can you provide evidence to back this up? What specific examples of authoritarian behavior has the government of the US engaged in? What ideological arguments have been used to rationalize this alleged behavior?
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2022 07:07 am
@hightor,
Lash and Builder constantly bad mouth the BBC and its reporters.

The hypocrisy is outstanding.
Frank Apisa
 
  2  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2022 07:10 am
@Lash,
Lash wrote:

That is precisely my point.


I doubt that was "precisely" your point, Lash.

Your point, nearly as I can determine, is to show that you have insights on the American political predicament that others are unable to attain.

You think that your jaded, negative view should be the standard view.

Several of us are attempting to tell you that your expectation in that regard will never prevail...mostly because your view sucks.

Quote:
They made a myriad of unintentional and intentional mistatements, but THEIR errors, miscalculations, and lies were protected speech, while others’ were reason for censorship, government scrutiny, job loss, and social media ban.


In many cases, particularly on the part of Dr. Fauci, the "errors, miscalculations, and lies" were not actually errors, miscalculations, or lies...but were informed suggestions based on the information then at hand. Then, as has ALWAYS HAPPENED in science, there were adjustments made (sometimes sharp adjustments), because further investigation provided updated information.

0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2022 07:23 am
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:

Lash and Builder constantly bad mouth the BBC and its reporters.

The hypocrisy is outstanding.

Liar.
https://able2know.org/topic/442994-1#post-6588567
Lash
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2022 07:25 am
@hightor,
The exponential increase in our surveillance state, primarily. The increasing government controls on our media and monitoring/controlling speech on social media.
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2022 07:28 am
@Lash,
Nobody believes that horseshit.

You'd think that someone who spent their whole time deceiving would be much better at it.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  0  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2022 07:50 am
@Frank Apisa,
Frank Apisa wrote:

Lash wrote:

I think both terms are made-up horseshit to chill speech. The Trump and Biden administrations, the CDC, and Dr Fauci can all be legitimately accused of various errors in speaking—mistakes, lies, cover-ups, and manipulative speech.


Is there anyone on this planet other than yourself that you think CANNOT be legitimately accused of various errors in speaking--mistakes, lies, cover-ups, and manipulative speech?

I doubt that was "precisely" your point, Lash.
Quote:
You doubt what you can’t understand, Frank. You’re too deeply mired in propaganda to look out at other perspectives. My view is widely shared by a subset of people outside your bubble who are furious at what’s happening in this country. You love what’s happening because your blue team seems to score points occasionally, so you feel *you* scored points. I’m sure anything that causes you to look past that tidy illusion is evil in your eyes. The progressives who recognize that the Squad and Bernie have gone establishment Dem are right here with me.

Your point, nearly as I can determine, is to show that you have insights on the American political predicament that others are unable to attain.
Quote:
As I said, a lot of people came to the same conclusions I have—just not shitlibs. Even the conservatives see it, they just don’t agree with our political solutions.

You think that your jaded, negative view should be the standard view.
Quote:
Jaded means we’ve learned from paying attention over a very long time, and negative means the country and the world are currently in the shitter.

Several of us are attempting to tell you that your expectation in that regard will never prevail...mostly because your view sucks.
Quote:
Current reality in this country and the world sucks. That doesn’t make me ignore it. But I definitely can see why you and your little friends like to post a lot about Trump and the other little political distractions that make you feel like you actually have some chance to win some little meaningless political victory while the world burns. Neither of us will win anything at the end of the day.
hightor
 
  3  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2022 08:25 am
@Lash,
Quote:
The exponential increase in our surveillance state, primarily.

This exponential increase is not being undertaken by the government, as it is in China, but under the auspices of private enterprise which has so much coercive power it should be termed "private government":

The Boss Will See You Now

Quote:
(...)

As it happened, the 1980s and 1990s were a major turning point in surveillance, the period when companies went on their first buying sprees for electronic performance-monitoring. In 1987 approximately six million workers were watched in some kind of mediated way, generally a video camera or audio recorder; by 1994, roughly one in seven American workers, about 20 million, was being electronically tracked at work. The numbers steadily increased from there. When videotape technology was supplanted by digital devices that could scan multiple locations at once, the cameras first installed to protect businesses from theft shifted their insatiable gaze from the merchandise to the workers.

The second big turning point in electronic performance-monitoring is happening right now. It’s driven by wearable tech, artificial intelligence, and Covid. Corporations’ use of surveillance software increased by 50 percent in 2020, the first year of the pandemic, according to some estimates, and has continued to grow.

This new tracking technology is ubiquitous and intrusive. Companies track for security, for efficiency, and because they can. They inspect and preserve and analyze movements, conversations, social connections, and affect. If the first surveillance expansion was a territorial grab, asserting authority over the whole person at work, the second is like fracking the land. It is changing the structural composition of how humans relate to one another and to themselves.

Some long-haul truckers have to drive a fifty-foot flatbed truck six hundred miles a day with a video camera staring them down the entire time, watching their eyes, their knuckles, their twitches, their whistles, their neck movements. Imagine living in front of that nosy boss-face camera for months on end as it scans your cab, which serves as your home most of the time. On one of many angry Reddit forums about driver-facing cameras, a trucker wrote that he’d put up with one only “if the company owner gives me a 24/7 unrestricted stream in to his house.” “Those few hundred miles a day is the only time I completely have to myself and I feel as if it is being tainted,” added another. “I just want to pick my nose and scratch my balls in peace man.” A bus driver described the human desire to

pull a weird face or talk to yourself or sing along with a song….

I could feel how much less cortisol was flowing through my body in my second job where the buses were older and did not have cameras inside. It makes you unhealthy and run down.


Employers read employees’ e-mails, track their Internet use, and listen to their conversations. Nurses and warehouse workers are forced to wear ID badges, wristbands, or clothing with chips that track their movements, measuring steps and comparing them to coworkers’ and the steps taken yesterday.

The wristbands that now commonly encircle your skin, caressing your median nerve, might in the future be used to send signals back to you or your employer, measuring how many minutes you spend in the bathroom. Amazon, which minutely tracks every moment of a warehouse worker’s activity, every pause and conversation, has a patent for a wristband that would, the Times reported, “emit ultrasonic sound pulses and radio transmissions to track where an employee’s hands were in relation to inventory bins” and then vibrate to steer the worker toward the correct bin. A “SmartCap” used in trucking monitors brainwaves for weariness.

(...)


That's not fascism. It's not really authoritarianism either. It's much more insidious.
hightor
 
  3  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2022 08:33 am
From the same article –

Quote:
All of this is demoralizing and dystopian, but what does it have to do with democracy? Elizabeth Anderson’s lively and persuasive 2017 book, Private Government, offers a partial answer. Anderson, a political philosopher at the University of Michigan, shakes the reader by the shoulders to get us out of the strange rigidity that pervades public discussion of government. Employment is a form of government, she argues, one that is far more relevant and immediate for most people than the Washington, D.C., kind.

A powerful company like Amazon, for instance, sets its own terms of employment—and in so doing impacts those of UPS drivers and the broader logistics industry. Private employers with industry-wide influence have coercive power—what Anderson calls governing power. Private government, personified by private guilds or by state-sanctioned economic monopolies in soap, salt, and leather, was the central target of intellectuals and activists like John Locke and the Levellers. Anderson sees in Locke, Adam Smith, and others a belief that the arbitrary power to debase and discipline is a threat to a free society, wherever it appears, and that public, accountable government should protect against private tyranny.

Many modern “thinkers and politicians,” she argues, are “like those patients who cannot perceive one-half of their bodies”: they “cannot perceive half of the economy: they cannot perceive the half that takes place beyond the market, after the employment contract is accepted.” As a result, companies are generally treated as wholly private.

Many private-sector workers, Anderson writes, live under

dictatorships in their work lives. Usually, those dictatorships have the legal authority to regulate workers’ off-hour lives as well—their political activities, speech, choice of sexual partner, use of recreational drugs, alcohol, smoking, and exercise.

For her, service workers who clock out, or technicians and realtors and cooks who seem endowed with substantial freedoms, are burdened by a legal system that allows corporations to fire a worker based on off-the-clock activity.

The speech rights of workers are practically nonexistent except as they explicitly relate to labor organizing, which, Anderson argues, is effectively a dead letter these days because of the difficulty of enforcement and the fear of challenging the boss’s tactics.

How did things get so bad? Anderson believes the root issues that enabled the current dystopian workplace go back generations. When the Industrial Revolution shifted the “primary site of paid work from the household to the factory,” it imported the long tradition of wholly arbitrary power within the household, in which children did not have freedom vis-à-vis their parents, and wives had limited freedom vis-à-vis their spouses. The Industrial Revolution could have provided an escape from the private tyrannies of home life, but instead it replicated them.

During the heyday of the Ford Motor Company, its Sociological Department began inspecting workers’ homes. Anderson writes:

Workers were eligible for Ford’s famous $5 daily wage only if they kept their homes clean, ate diets deemed healthy, abstained from drinking, used the bathtub appropriately, did not take in boarders, avoided spending too much on foreign relatives, and were assimilated to American cultural norms.

Anderson points out that while Apple does not visit people’s homes today, it does require retail workers to open their bags for inspections before coming into work. We take this for granted, she notes, but should we? Nearly half of Americans have undergone a suspicionless drug test. And many workers have no protection from getting fired for what they say on social media. To those who claim the workplace isn’t government because you can quit, Anderson retorts, “This is like saying Mussolini wasn’t a dictator, because Italians could emigrate.”

ibid

0 Replies
 
Frank Apisa
 
  5  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2022 09:08 am
@Lash,
Lash wrote:
Current reality in this country and the world sucks. That doesn’t make me ignore it. But I definitely can see why you and your little friends like to post a lot about Trump and the other little political distractions that make you feel like you actually have some chance to win some little meaningless political victory while the world burns. Neither of us will win anything at the end of the day.


Your negativity is almost beyond measure, Lash. But if that is the way you feel about things, you certainly have the right to express those feelings. I feels sorry for people like you. That much negativity would drown me. In any case, those of us who see things differently certainly have as much right to express our feelings as do you.

Hightor puts lots of effort and research into countering your claims. It seem to go nowhere with you. I applaud him, but I think it is like pissing into the wind.

Lash
 
  0  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2022 09:48 am
@Frank Apisa,
Sometimes, the information Hightor brings does resonate, but most of the time, his material is closely-related but not exactly what I’m talking about. I appreciate him.

I deeply respect the high level of his integrity to address issues and not personalities. He’s rare in that respect.

I also appreciate you acknowledging that I have a right to express my views equal to that of others’. I’m not really trying to convince, just to express. If I’m questioned in good faith, I try to answer in kind.

My negativity is beyond measure when considering this stuff. Thank Bob for compartmentalizing.☮️


0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2022 09:53 am
@hightor,
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-nsa-spying/u-s-court-mass-surveillance-program-exposed-by-snowden-was-illegal-idUSKBN25T3CK

Excerpt:

U.S. court: Mass surveillance program exposed by Snowden was illegal
By Raphael Satter

(Reuters) - Seven years after former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden blew the whistle on the mass surveillance of Americans’ telephone records, an appeals court has found the program was unlawful - and that the U.S. intelligence leaders who publicly defended it were not telling the truth.

In a ruling handed down on Wednesday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit said the warrantless telephone dragnet that secretly collected millions of Americans’ telephone records violated the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act and may well have been unconstitutional.

Snowden, who fled to Russia in the aftermath of the 2013 disclosures and still faces U.S. espionage charges, said on Twitter that the ruling was a vindication of his decision to go public with evidence of the National Security Agency’s domestic eavesdropping operation
Lash
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2022 09:59 am
More government infiltration in social media

Facebook, Twitter dismantle a U.S. influence campaign about Ukraine
Accounts promoting U.S. government messages violated the platforms’ rules against coordinated inauthentic behavior


By Naomi Nix

Excerpt:

Facebook and Twitter disrupted a web of accounts that were covertly seeking to influence users in the Middle East and Asia with pro-Western perspectives about international politics, including Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, according to a new report from social media analytics firm Graphika and Stanford University.

The covert influence operation used accounts on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and other social media giants to promote narratives supporting the interests of the United States and its allies while opposing countries including Russia, China and Iran, according to the report.
Covert influence campaigns run out of Russia and Iran repeatedly have been targeted by social media platforms over the years. This crackdown is the rare instance in which a U.S.-sponsored campaign targeting foreign audiences was found to violate the companies’ rules.
__________________

The government shouldn’t be using deceptive accounts in social media. These are the weaker sisters…
 

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