Germlat
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Aug, 2014 06:59 am
@farmerman,
I think the personal tragedies of others touch us because we recognize vulnerability.
Buttermilk
 
  3  
Reply Sun 17 Aug, 2014 08:03 am
@farmerman,
Indeed...

0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  4  
Reply Sun 17 Aug, 2014 08:07 am
@Germlat,
Germlat wrote:

I think the personal tragedies of others touch us because we recognize vulnerability.


Or it's something to talk about until the next thing that doesn't involve us happens, so we can talk about that.
Ragman
 
  5  
Reply Sun 17 Aug, 2014 08:29 am
@Germlat,
..and Robin's vulnerability always was clearly displayed.

I just heard about how much he dedicated his time (not just money) to entertaining the troops through the USO. This was something he believed in and he didn't advertise or discuss but was deeply appreciated.

"Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel honored Williams on behalf of the Department of Defense on Monday, remembering his patriotism.

"Robin was a gifted actor and comedian, but he was also a true friend and supporter of our troops," he said in a statement. "From entertaining thousands of service men and women in war zones, to his philanthropy that helped veterans struggling with hidden wounds of war, he was a loyal and compassionate advocate for all who serve this nation in uniform.

"He will be dearly missed by the men and women of the DoD – so many of whom were personally touched by his humor and generosity."
revelette2
 
  4  
Reply Sun 17 Aug, 2014 10:32 am
@Ragman,
The more you learn about him, the sadder it gets.
0 Replies
 
Romeo Fabulini
 
  2  
Reply Sun 17 Aug, 2014 11:35 am
We've all had problems but we don't string ourselves up at the drop of a hat!
For example in 2002 I was just out of jail (3 month vigliante rap), jobless, homeless, girlfriendless, near-penniless and living rough in a tent in a wood, shivering with illness, but I was too busy laughing at myself to let it get me down.
"Oh Great" I thought, "I've ended up as Bigfoot"
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Aug, 2014 11:59 am
@Romeo Fabulini,
Quote:
We've all had problems but we don't string ourselves up at the drop of a hat!


I have well documented Williams deep and lasting problems. His life had turned to crap, and if he indeed had Parkinson's his comedy was finished (which is said many times was his therapy) because the first thing it would have taken from him was his rapid fire delivery.

Another thing about his finances...when ever he did sell the ranch he was going to have to pay a ton of capital gains taxes, even if he got $25 million for it he was not going to keep that much. Now that it cant be a winery the hope is that some tech big shot will want it, but the two problem with that plan are that these guys generally want their dream home, not someone elses dream home, and there is all of that ******* property to manage. We should know in the next two years what it is worth, as there is no indication that the estate will sit on the property.
0 Replies
 
Romeo Fabulini
 
  2  
Reply Sun 17 Aug, 2014 12:08 pm
Williams must have made millions from his films, so it beats me why he thought he had to resort to booze and drugs for "happiness".
Judy Garland also raked in big bucks but she said "If I'm so famous, why am I so lonely?"
As four great philosophers once said-

0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 17 Aug, 2014 12:23 pm
Quote:
Robin Williams' rehab friend has revealed that the late actor told her that he wanted his death to be quick along with being clean and sober.

Teresa Cohen asserted that the 'Mrs. Doubtfire' actor dreaded dying while high on drugs or alcohol, the Daily Star reported.

Cohen said that Williams cried when he told her his greatest fear was relapsing and he might die early because of excessive drinking while his family watched helplessly.

She continued saying that the late 63-year-old actor did not want to die the slow, painful death of an addict who made everyone around him suffer too.

Teresa added that Williams told her that he was always pleased and proud to meet fans but felt under constant pressure wherever he went to 'wear a happy mask' and put on some kind of crazy performance.


http://www.business-standard.com/article/news-ani/robin-williams-wanted-quick-sober-death-claims-rehab-friend-114081700448_1.html

We are starting to get some good testimony as to his state of mind in those last months, even though the family is not talking. We can surmise that he felt much the same way about dying with Parkinsons as he did dying baked.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Sun 17 Aug, 2014 12:56 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
His career was coming apart. "Continental Divide" did not do well at the box office. There were arguments and major problems during the shooting of "Neighbors." Work was at a standstill on the screenplay for Belushi's next project, titled "Noble Rot." All the career setbacks are described by Woodward. They were accompanied by episodes of drug and alcohol abuse that grew increasingly alarming to his friends and family.

http://www.rogerebert.com/interviews/why-john-belushi-died

Another great clue...Belushi's death was huge for Williams, it made him quit drugs and stay quit for God's sake....but when Belushi's career stopped working the end was just around the corner. Williams career was in the crapper, and it looked like Parkinsons was about to or already had ended his ability to work altogether, maybe to Williams that meant that he was about to lose the ability to hold out against his addictions. Clearly he became increasingly frantic about this those last years.
cicerone imposter
 
  0  
Reply Sun 17 Aug, 2014 01:31 pm
@hawkeye10,
About 99.99% of your post is ignorance personified - all based on your imagination. You're just wasting cyberspace with your crap. Get a life!
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Sun 17 Aug, 2014 01:40 pm
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:

About 99.99% of your post is ignorance personified - all based on your imagination. You're just wasting cyberspace with your crap. Get a life!
there is zero imagination, everything I have posted is based upon facts/evidence and the testimony of those who knew him. The trick is figuring out what matters and what does not matter, which is where wisdom comes it.

Had you been smarter about trying to cut me down you would have said that I am too stupid to know what matters, you would not have claimed that what I post is imagination. But no, instead you show that you are a fool.

izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Sun 17 Aug, 2014 02:00 pm
@hawkeye10,
So what is it? Are you still claiming that his suicide was financially driven, or are you beginning to accept it was depression, and that the Parkinson's contributed a great deal to that depression?

That's what most people realised a few days, and everything you've posted, apart from your own comments, concurs with that.

I don't see Wisdom, I see a painfully slow learner.
OmSigDAVID
 
  3  
Reply Sun 17 Aug, 2014 02:04 pm
@chai2,
Germlat wrote:

I think the personal tragedies of others touch us because we recognize vulnerability.
chai2 wrote:

Or it's something to talk about until the next thing
that doesn't involve us happens, so we can talk about that.
We do a lot of that.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  3  
Reply Sun 17 Aug, 2014 02:08 pm
@Romeo Fabulini,
Romeo Fabulini wrote:
We've all had problems but we don't string ourselves up at the drop of a hat!
I 'm glad that he did not use a gun.
If he had, then gun ownership wud be getting blamed.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 17 Aug, 2014 02:17 pm
@izzythepush,
Quote:
So what is it? Are you still claiming that his suicide was financially driven, or are you beginning to accept it was depression, and that the Parkinson's contributed a great deal to that depression


I have come across very little evidence that this choice was driven by clinical depression. It is very likely that Williams made a clear headed choice using logic and based upon facts/evidence that he did not want to stick around. The major component seems to be that he did not want to be a burden to his family. I am still looking into how much he agreed with Miles, that when he could not use his talent to further the craft anymore that it was time to go. So far this does not look likely, for him the work seems to have been a tool to keep the demons in check. But being forced to do Mrs Doubtfire again because he needed the check might have been too loathsome, I am sure he had his limits on the value of keeping busy as it increasingly meant more crappy work with smaller paychecks. Given his physical condition (heart) keeping too busy was going to ruin him too....he was caught between a rock and a hard place. Death was the only escape. Money may or may not have been able to make a difference, but since he could not unload the ranch and he could not get a good paycheck for his work that was a moot point. He was watching his wealth and bank accounts balances vanish very quickly, with no end in sight.

That is where I am today.
Romeo Fabulini
 
  2  
Reply Sun 17 Aug, 2014 02:19 pm
In a way, Williams left a good lesson behind him that kids can learn from, namely that no matter how much fame and money you've got, it's no guarantee that you'll be happy, and not even booze and drugs will help you..Smile
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Sun 17 Aug, 2014 02:20 pm
@hawkeye10,
Your use of the word 'logic' is comical. Thanks for the laugh!

Of coarse, you would know better than many of his family, friends and the media about Robin's depression.

From the Boston Globe.
Quote:
Robin Williams’s death brings issue of depression to forefront
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Aug, 2014 02:21 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
Teresa added that Williams told her that he was always pleased
and proud to meet fans but felt under constant pressure
wherever he went to 'wear a happy mask' and put on some kind of crazy performance.
I always like him best, when he was calm
and thoughtful, expressing kindness thru good advice.


http://www.business-standard.com/article/news-ani/robin-williams-wanted-quick-sober-death-claims-rehab-friend-114081700448_1.html

hawkeye10 wrote:
We are starting to get some good testimony
as to his state of mind in those last months, even though the family
is not talking. We can surmise that he felt much the same way about
dying with Parkinsons as he did dying baked.
Did he have an un-natural fear of getting baked ?





David
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Aug, 2014 02:33 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Quote:

Quote:
Teresa added that Williams told her that he was always pleased
and proud to meet fans but felt under constant pressure
wherever he went to 'wear a happy mask' and put on some kind of crazy performance.
I always like him best, when he was calm
and thoughtful, expressing kindness thru good advice.





I find it very interesting that Belushi got to the same place, where the expectations of the people he came into contact with became a great burden, both men did not want to disappoint their fans but trying to satisfy their fans began to suck the life out of them. Williams especially had some very nasty things to say about fame. We loved him, but I am not at all sure that Williams loved us at the end.
 

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