blatham
 
  4  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2014 07:10 pm
Well, my world just got a **** of a lot bleaker.
0 Replies
 
Germlat
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2014 07:13 pm
@Germlat,
My favorites: Hook, Dead Poets Society, The Birdcage. He was lovely! It's sad!!
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2014 07:43 pm
@tsarstepan,
I've been more or less away from tv and a lot of movies for almost twenty years, mostly having to do with money and devices and difficulty in dark theaters, excuse me, excuse me, sorry, excuse me (lack of rods), but also my particular interests when I do watch movies, first when I had vcr and lately, netflix, have their own directions. But I still read up. I always liked Robin Williams and have seen him mentioned in the SF Chronicle off and on. I think his giant house was for sale (may still be) recently, as I follow both the SF entertainment and real estate sections. I remember not liking it, not sure if I complained in the comment section (ugh, if so).

Robin, we have loved you, I am so sorry.
0 Replies
 
hingehead
 
  4  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2014 07:45 pm
The first time I saw Robin Williams was his first appearance as Mork on Happy Days. To my mid-teen self he it was like he was in colour while the rest of the show was in black and white. He changed standup comedy - and from my twitter feed a lot of stand up comedians feel the same - universally perceived as a truly nice guy.
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2014 07:56 pm
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  4  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2014 07:58 pm
@hingehead,
hingehead wrote:

The first time I saw Robin Williams was his first appearance as Mork on Happy Days.


I saw that episode while I was playing pool on my 21st birthday.

I was with my work crew at the Marathon Motor Inn

http://www.airportinnmarathon.com/s/cc_images/cache_622035004.png?t=1363832578

We'd been drinking a bit so the whole surreal Happy Days episode ran through an extra special filter for us.

The next day we were still trying to figure out if we'd understood what we'd seen.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-DD2yay_DgzU/TsOLdpRklcI/AAAAAAAAIf8/rOWUy1H5lRI/s1600/Picture%252B4.png
0 Replies
 
hingehead
 
  3  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2014 08:04 pm
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2014 08:32 pm
@tsarstepan,
Quote:
His career was still going strong despite a few recent Razzie worthy film projects.
no, he was working very little in any capacity, and his last attempt at comedy.... the Weapons of Self Destruction tour (written 08/09), I did not find to be very good.

Williams was well known to have a lot of demons, he had over the years been pretty upfront about them, I am not surprised he decided to check out.

1982 An Evening with Robin Williams was genus.

Most memorable acting role for me was Good Will Hunting, but he had a lot of great movie performances. I think he along with Steve Martin are going to end up better known for acting than for comedy.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2014 10:14 pm

I did not see all of his work.
I liked him best in: "What Dreams May Come".
nononono
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2014 10:26 pm
@OmSigDAVID,


Popeye! We had that on VHS. I was a little kid, maybe 6 or 7. Watched it over and over.

Also, 'One Hour Photo' as an adult blew me away...
OmSigDAVID
 
  2  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2014 10:39 pm
@nononono,
That was terrific casting of Olive Oyl.

I thawt thay 'd have him consume some spinach
b4 dispatching his adversary.
nononono
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2014 10:50 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Quote:
That was terrific casting of Olive Oyl.


I completely agree! Shelley Duvall is the physical embodiment of Olive Oil. the guy who plays Popeye's dad looks perfect for the role too. It was just a great movie for kids.

Robert Altman directed it too!

izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Aug, 2014 01:58 am
Depression is inexplicable, it's not logical. Stephen Fry has spoken quite openly about it, he ran off to Belgium after one bad review for a West End play. At the time he felt it was the only thing he could do. It doesn't matter how well loved you are, and Stephen Fry, like Robin Williams, is incredibly well loved. Depression will always make you feel inadequate and worthless.

If anything positive can come from Robin William's death it might be that people start being more aware of depression.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Tue 12 Aug, 2014 02:08 am
@izzythepush,
Quote:
If anything positive can come from Robin William's death it might be that people start being more aware of depression.


Here is one more: depressed fucked up people make the best comedians.

Jesus, the man lived to be 63, he did more great work for the collective than 99+% of us here ever will in our lives even if we live to be 90, this was a win.

Stop moping. Cue up Youtube or Netflix and enjoy his work. Then do a line in his memory, Robin would have liked that.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Tue 12 Aug, 2014 02:25 am
I didn't see the Happy Days episode, because i no longer watched network sitcoms by then, and especially would not have watched one as feeble as that. I first saw him in the summer of 1978 (i believe it was) on a summer replacement show, a comedy special from San Francisco. He did a stand-up routine, while playing the part of a Russian stand-up comedian. (He sort of reprised that role in the movie Moscow on the Hudson, in which he played a Russian circus performer who defects.)

Although i no longer watched tee vee sitcoms, the weekly broadcast of Mork and Mindy became so popular that, among the young at least, the nation tuned in every Monday night. (I think it was on Monday, it's not important.) In bars, they'd tune in for the show. People would walk up to one another saying "Nan-nu, nan-nu." He was one of those rare performers who was a hit almost from the beginning of his career.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Tue 12 Aug, 2014 02:32 am
It may have been the summer of 1977--here's a vid of him doing his Russian stand-up comic routine in 1977 (not the show i saw). He's all of 25 or 26 at this time:

0 Replies
 
blatham
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Aug, 2014 04:22 am
@nononono,
Re Popeye film...

That was a film I awaited perhaps more than any other. As kids, we were Popeye addicts and then to hear the key artists involved - Altman directing, screenplay by Jules Feiffer, Williams and Duvall in the lead roles, music by Harry Nillson.

And the sets for the film were probably the most artistically creative I had ever seen.
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  2  
Reply Tue 12 Aug, 2014 04:31 am
@Butrflynet,
He was too good to be true. Now he's just a legend. Feels like it almost had to end this way. Still I'm glad we got to share the planet together for a while; an honor.
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  2  
Reply Tue 12 Aug, 2014 04:57 am

Quote:
A bench in Boston's Public Garden has become a memorial to Robin Williams. Some famous quotes are written below.


https://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpf1/v/t1.0-9/10306740_10152642181239445_1778508831976309929_n.jpg?oh=08f1280861d15e41b5192d807046cb70&oe=545C1636&__gda__=1417217097_4260c5031f44df58ba2d6cc6e76cb04e
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  2  
Reply Tue 12 Aug, 2014 07:50 am
The first time I ever saw Robin Williams was when Dick Cavett interviewed him. My dad was watching and yelled "You've got to come see this guy!"

He was a maniac, running around the stage, doing improv with the set decorations. Cavett had no idea how to rein him in.

My favorite movie of his will always be "The Fisher King".

0 Replies
 
 

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