0
   

Do Warner Bros. and Disney still dominate the TV toon market like they did in the late 20th century?

 
 
Rebelofnj
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jul, 2020 05:00 pm
@JGoldman10,
But how are you going to stand out for the many other creators and studios out there who have made their own animated shows?

How are you going people to watch your work?
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jul, 2020 05:01 pm
@Rebelofnj,
Goober and the ghostchasers would have ended up in court had it been made by anyone else.
JGoldman10
 
  0  
Reply Thu 30 Jul, 2020 05:03 pm
@JGoldman10,
JGoldman10 wrote:

Dozens of animated films, theatrical and/or direct-to-video, get produced every year.


I assume the same could be said of made-for-TV animated films, but I don't know if that's true or not. I know of a few made-for-TV animated films that have been made that were based on Cartoon Network shows and Disney cable/satellite TV cartoon shows from the last two decades.
Rebelofnj
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jul, 2020 05:12 pm
@JGoldman10,
Yes. It is true.

I recently watched Steven Universe: The Movie. It featured a villain who is heavily based on Silent Age cartoons, with the rubber hose movements.
One could make the argument that the film is centered around older style animation versus modern animation, but that is another discussion.

0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  0  
Reply Thu 30 Jul, 2020 05:15 pm
@izzythepush,
Sounds like a Ghostbusters knockoff.

Speaking of Ghostbusters, there were two cartoon shows that were produced by two different cartoon studios that were out at the same time that bore the same name. There was Filmation's Ghostbusters and Columbia Pictures' The Real Ghostbusters. I think this was the first and only time in animation history something like this ever happened.

The Filmation cartoon was nothing like the Columbia Pictures cartoon. The Filmation version was first and it is was based on a live-action series Filmation produced with the same name. Columbia's show was based on the live-action movie they produced. Columbia was allowed to keep the name of the series but they had to include "The Real" in the title to avoid confusion with Filmation's cartoon.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jul, 2020 05:54 pm
@JGoldman10,
No it wasn’t.

It was a Scooby Doo knock off by Hannah Barbera years before Ghostbusters came out.

It was a cartoon dog with teenagers one was very like shaggy and another like Velma. Goober was scared all the time like Scooby Doo but unlike Scooby, he could turn invisible. He also wore a hat and scarf.

If you want to talk about Ghostbusters go ahead, but don’t pretend to be remotely interested in what I just posted.
Rebelofnj
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Jul, 2020 09:19 am
@JGoldman10,
So why did you mostly ignore the changes in animation and most animated projects since 2000?

It seems that you were at least aware of the films and shows released in the 80s and 90s, and have seen a few of them, then you suddenly stopped paying attention after 2000.

Normally, it wouldn't be a big deal for most people to stop caring about certain media and hobbies (I have no interest in sports, for example), except you are trying to "produce some animated cartoons and comics that [you] can showcase online and monetize" and you haven't paid much attention to changes in animation and technology for the last 20 years.
JGoldman10
 
  0  
Reply Fri 31 Jul, 2020 09:46 am
@Rebelofnj,
Are there any major changes in how comics - comic books and comic strips - have been made since the year 2000 that I should be aware of?

I know web comics are produced with digital ink and paint. Most if not all.

I know comic book publishers are producing comic books using digital ink and paint. The original art work is still hand-drawn with pencil but the pencils are scanned into computers and then inked and colored in using 2-D software. I assume DC and Marvel have been producing their comics this way since 2000. Am I correct?
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  0  
Reply Fri 31 Jul, 2020 09:48 am
@izzythepush,
I think I have heard of that cartoon.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Jul, 2020 10:00 am
@JGoldman10,
You can google it.
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  0  
Reply Fri 31 Jul, 2020 10:12 am
@Rebelofnj,
Yes I've seen a bunch of cartoon shows and animated films from the '80s and '90s.
Rebelofnj
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Jul, 2020 10:20 am
@JGoldman10,
I know, that is what I said. It was very clear from countless discussions.

So why haven't you seen a bunch of animated shows and animated films from the 00s and 10s?

As I said, you just stopped paying attention after 2000.
JGoldman10
 
  0  
Reply Fri 31 Jul, 2020 02:12 pm
@Rebelofnj,
I've watched some animated shows from the last two decades. Some kids'/family cartoons and some adult ones. I said in another thread I used to watch Adult Swim but stopped for religious reasons.
Rebelofnj
 
  1  
Reply Mon 3 Aug, 2020 06:52 am
@JGoldman10,
However, you don't really talk aboout the newer shows as much. You talked more positively towards older cartoons like the Catillac Cats.

I'm guessing you don't like any, or at least don't care, about the newer shows.

Also: you never answered my questions.

Are you worried that someone may accidentally make a series that is similar to your ideas?

How are you going to stand out from the many other creators and studios out there who have made their own animated shows?

How are you going to get people to watch your work, with so many entertainment options available?
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 3 Aug, 2020 08:16 am
@Rebelofnj,
Rebelofnj wrote:


Are you worried that someone may accidentally make a series that is similar to your ideas?



No, because I can always get my stuff copyrighted with the Library of Congress.

Years ago, I got my characters Tuffy and Bull, the two main characters from the cartoon and/or comics series about street fighting cats and dogs that fight crime, which I originally planned on developing, copyrighted with the LOC. I created, illustrated and wrote a preliminary comic book story that featured them and a few related characters. So Tuffy and Bull, and the few related characters that were featured in the story, as far as I understand, are already copyrighted.

As I said in another thread I'm not an expert on copyright and trademark law.

I'd like to know how many ways I can get my OC's copyrighted with the LOC.

I'm wondering if I can simply submit stills of my OC's, which would include group pics of my OC's to the LOC for copyright.

As an artist I should know the technical term or terms cartoonists and animators use to refer specifically to the type of art I'm referring to but I don't what it's called off-hand. I'm going to look this up and ask about this.

I should know all the technical jargon cartoonists and animators use for their work in general anyway. I don't unfortunately so I need to do some research on this.

I know what model sheets and character studies are.

I should and need to know what fixed forms of cartoon work that show off your characters are acceptable to submit to the LOC for copyright.

It only costs $20 to get something copyrighted.

I'd like to get all my characters copyrighted with the LOC.

I remember reading and being told the easiest way to ensure no one steals your characters is to create art of your characters and mail the art to yourself, and if I remember right, don't open the envelope, or simply sign your name (you can just use your initials) to your work and put a circled "C" and the year next to your signature, but I don't know how legally-binding this is.
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 3 Aug, 2020 08:17 am
@Rebelofnj,
I will get back to you with answers to your other questions and about the comments you made about old and new cartoon shows another time.
0 Replies
 
Rebelofnj
 
  2  
Reply Mon 3 Aug, 2020 08:31 am
@JGoldman10,
I'm not talking about other people using your copyrighted characters. I mean, people creating a story that is similar to yours.

As I mentioned, Pixar cancelled their film Newt because it was too similar to a competitor's film. They could not continue work on it as people may claim Pixar is ripping off the film Rio.

What if someone does decide to produce a TV series about street fighting cats and dogs (I'm assuming you are still working on that premise) and it becomes popular? Would you still work on your own project?
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Mon 3 Aug, 2020 08:44 am
@Rebelofnj,
Rebelofnj wrote:


What if someone does decide to produce a TV series about street fighting cats and dogs (I'm assuming you are still working on that premise) and it becomes popular? Would you still work on your own project?

We're likely to get to the heat death of the universe before he reveals, let alone publishes, anything.
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Aug, 2020 09:58 pm
The Terrytoons cartoons are owned by Paramount. 20th Century Fox distributed the cartoons but never owned them. This article confirms that:

http://www.animationscoop.com/beyond-the-simpsons-what-animation-assets-disney-will-own-by-acquiring-fox/

What Golden Age Hollywood cartoons did 20th Century Fox originally create and produce? I'm trying to look this up out of curiosity.
Rebelofnj
 
  2  
Reply Wed 5 Aug, 2020 03:23 am
@JGoldman10,
You ignored my questions again.

How are you going to stand out from the many other creators and studios out there who have made their own animated shows?

How are you going to get people to watch your work, with so many entertainment options available?
 

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