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True version of Vlad Dracula, 15'th century

 
 
Reply Sat 23 May, 2015 03:20 pm
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EAzwR48IDKc

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Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 1,958 • Replies: 9
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oralloy
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 May, 2015 10:27 pm

An hour plus is a bit much to listen to, but Mr. Dracula certainly knew what to do when Muslims come invading your country, and he did it well.

We need leaders like him today.
gungasnake
 
  2  
Reply Sat 23 May, 2015 10:36 pm
@oralloy,
The guy caused major wreckage within a Turkish army which was many times what he could have fielded.
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Ionus
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 May, 2015 05:21 am
@gungasnake,
Its a bit long, I will have to watch some other time but his father was called Dracul because he was leader of a Sect of Christian Knights who called themselves "Dragons" or Dracul . Vlad was nicknamed Dracula, the diminutive of Dracul .

His most famous act was to impale 10,000 Muslim prisoners in front of an advancing Muslim Army . To impale someone a greased stake was inserted in the anus and if done correctly, it would only take out one lung and sit in your rib cage, taking days to die . He was imprisoned for some years by his leader and was a bit mental after that, enjoying eating in front of the dying, which some say totalled 100,000 in his lifetime .

Christians heard about him through Muslim Universities, strangely enough, as the devil himself . In his native country Romania he is celebrated to this day as a great hero and saviour of his people .

Bram Stoker probably got the idea from a Muslim and wrote his famous novel based on the true story .

Fact is stranger than fiction, and a neighbouring noble family were the Frankensteins , so Dracula versus Frankenstein has some truth to it as the families did clash, the German Frankensteins were trying to protect Saxon tradesmen in Transylvania, one of Draculas favourite spots for raiding .
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 May, 2015 05:53 am
@Ionus,
Being impaled was a candidate for worst way to die ever devised and that Turkish army must have marched for twenty or thirty miles seeing guys just like them impaled on stakes every ten or fifteen yards until they finally couldn't deal with it anymore and chickened out.
Ionus
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 May, 2015 09:42 am
@gungasnake,
Yeah, its a brilliant psychological tool . Invented by the Ancient Egyptians who had the idea that you wouldnt enter the afterlife because no one was allowed to touch such a body...it was strictly carrion . Dracula was no more violent than others of his time, he just had a lasting impact on the Muslims .
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oralloy
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 May, 2015 06:42 pm
@Ionus,
Ionus wrote:
His most famous act was to impale 10,000 Muslim prisoners in front of an advancing Muslim Army .

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Night_Attack

"The conflict initially started with Vlad's refusal to pay the jizya (tax on non-Muslims) to the Sultan and intensified when Vlad Ţepeş invaded Bulgaria and impaled over 23,000 Turks. Mehmed then raised a great army with the objective to conquer Wallachia and annex it to his empire. The two leaders fought a series of skirmishes, the most notable one being the Night Attack where Vlad Ţepeş attacked the Turkish camp in the night in an attempt to kill Mehmed.

The assassination attempt failed and Mehmed marched to the Wallachian capital of Târgovişte, where he discovered another 20,000 impaled Turks. Horrified, the Sultan and his troops retreated."
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Ionus
 
  0  
Reply Wed 27 May, 2015 02:33 am

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/dracula-goes-on-sale-in-london?cmpid=Social_FBPAGE_HISTORY_20150526_182451052&linkId=14468766

Quote:

26th May 1897

The first copies of the classic vampire novel Dracula, by Irish writer Bram Stoker, appear in London bookshops on this day in 1897.

A childhood invalid, Stoker grew up to become a football (soccer) star at Trinity College, Dublin. After graduation, he got a job in civil service at Dublin Castle, where he worked for the next 10 years while writing drama reviews for the Dublin Mail on the side. In this way, Stoker met the well-respected actor Sir Henry Irving, who hired him as his manager. Stoker stayed in the post for most of the next three decades, writing Irving’s voluminous correspondence for him and accompanying him on tours in the United States. Over the years, Stoker began writing a number of horror stories for magazines, and in 1890 he published his first novel, The Snake’s Pass.

Stoker would go on to publish 17 novels in all, but it was his 1897 novel Dracula that eventually earned him literary fame and became known as a masterpiece of Victorian-era Gothic literature. Written in the form of diaries and journals of its main characters, Dracula is the story of a vampire who makes his way from Transylvania–a region of Eastern Europe now in Romania–to Yorkshire, England, and preys on innocents there to get the blood he needs to live. Stoker had originally named the vampire “Count Wampyr.” He found the name Dracula in a book on Wallachia and Moldavia written by retired diplomat William Wilkinson, which he borrowed from a Yorkshire public library during his family’s vacations there.

Vampires–who left their burial places at night to drink the blood of humans–were popular figures in folk tales from ancient times, but Stoker’s novel catapulted them into the mainstream of 20th-century literature. Upon its release, Dracula enjoyed moderate success, though when Stoker died in 1912 none of his obituaries even mentioned Dracula by name. Sales began to take off in the 1920s, when the novel was adapted for Broadway. Dracula mania kicked into even higher gear with Universal’s blockbuster 1931 film, directed by Tod Browning and starring the Hungarian actor Bela Lugosi. Dozens of vampire-themed movies, television shows and literature followed, though Lugosi, with his exotic accent, remains the quintessential Count Dracula. Late 20th-century examples of the vampire craze include the bestselling novels of American writer Anne Rice and the cult hit TV series Buffy the Vampire Slayer.






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oralloy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 May, 2015 10:08 pm

So, I was looking at the tags and wondering who was ignorant enough to think that Vlad Dracula wasn't a real historical figure....

http://able2know.org/user/bobsal_u1553115/tags/history_on_beer_and_jd/
http://able2know.org/user/bobsal_u1553115/tags/psuedo_science_meeting/
Ionus
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 May, 2015 10:54 pm
@oralloy,
No surprises there, ignorance overwhelms some people . I added some better ones . Just add these to the top under My Tags and it should cancel out the stupid ones .

My Tags: [X] History, [X] Romania, [X] Dracula, [X] Vlad Tepes, [X] Ottomans
0 Replies
 
 

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