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Where did our notion of a 'scholar' come from?

 
 
Reply Wed 16 Jun, 2010 08:22 pm
I wonder where the notion of 'scholarship', and the 'scholar' come from. 10,000 years ago, everyone on the planet were hunters, and gathers. People at that time forage for food. Once in a while, you see an enemy group competing with your group for natural resources, so it makes sense to have a warrior classes hanging around. With the emergence of farming, it makes sense to have people defending your land, so soldiers were nice to have around. The notion of a 'scholar' is completely different. Scholars are suppose to be people that get pay to think, and write books, and articles. You don ` t need a scholar to run the government, fight enemy, or farming the land. Scholars can ` t paint, draw, make stuff, or fix stuff. So, where did the notion of 'scholarship' come from? Why is there a class of people that sits around all day, thinking, writing, and doing math( if they are mathematicians). My guess is that our notion of a 'scholar' comes from the church, and the function of 'priest'. In Jewish religion, there is a demand for scholars. The notion of a rabbi is in fact a telmudic scholar. The spread of Christianity demands the use of priest, and the need for people to learn to write and read stuff. This is in fact the case if you look at the original of the oldest universities we have in Europe. They all started up in popping priest out of these institution. This explain why literacy develop, but why is there people 'studying' for a living? I think it has to be Judaism! The whole notion of a class of people just studying comes from the Jews. It is part of Jewish law to study. Later, Christians developed a need to interpret the bible, so, they also need people to do this job.
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plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Jun, 2010 09:20 pm
@TuringEquivalent,
I'm sorry that you think scholars are not needed to "run the government, fight enemy, or farming the land."

What is your first language?
laughoutlood
 
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Reply Wed 16 Jun, 2010 10:15 pm
@TuringEquivalent,
You've really gone to school on this question haven't you.
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TuringEquivalent
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2010 12:16 am
@plainoldme,
plainoldme wrote:

I'm sorry that you think scholars are not needed to "run the government, fight enemy, or farming the land."

What is your first language?



why so sorry? what is your second language?
plainoldme
 
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Reply Fri 18 Jun, 2010 12:04 am
@TuringEquivalent,
It's just that you are obviously not a native speaker of English. It would be helpful to know where you are coming from.
TuringEquivalent
 
  0  
Reply Fri 18 Jun, 2010 12:23 am
@plainoldme,
plainoldme wrote:

It's just that you are obviously not a native speaker of English. It would be helpful to know where you are coming from.


Does it matter? This is a history forum. I want to think about history. If you don` t understand, fine. Don` t comment.
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Jun, 2010 09:37 pm
@TuringEquivalent,
Hey, I was being kind to you. You wrote in an illiterate fashion. I thought perhaps you were foreign born. Now I see that you are a small-minded idiot. Want a second opinion? You're rude.
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AugustineBrother
 
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Reply Mon 8 Aug, 2016 12:59 pm
@TuringEquivalent,
Turing was in many ways a wretched man, I hope he is not your view of a scholar.
As to your analysis I'm afraid it is just warmed-over Ayn Rand in its assumptions. The book that probably started my conversion was by her and I read it when I was taking a Statistics course years ago. It was called 'For the New Intellectual" and it still holds the record with me of the most unfair book ever written.

I do agree with your favorable view of Judaism however.
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Miller
 
  0  
Reply Fri 14 Oct, 2016 06:04 am
Quote:
The whole notion of a class of people just studying comes from the Jews. It is part of Jewish law to study.


If there's a specific "class" of people, who have been ordained to "study" for their living ( i.e. Torah scholars), why should others be discriminated against and prohibited from earning a living by studying night and day?

Why not allow everyone to study night and day? By the way, who's paying the bills, while the "scholars" are studying?

Moreover, why is this "studying" you're referring to, both a "gender-specific" activity and apparently a "class-specific" activity?

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