9
   

Is it emotionally devastating to accidentally spill coffee at work?

 
 
Reply Sat 14 Apr, 2018 07:22 pm
I accidentally knocked over a cup of coffee near the end of my shift. I had the extremely painful and devastated expression on my face. When a coworker asked me what was wrong, I burst into tears and told her I spilled coffee and that it’s emotionally painful. She and a few other coworkers said it’s no big deal and to clean it up. One other coworker just looked at me weird.

I just wish I could have sympathy from everyone, but I’m glad I was able to get sympathy from a few. That’s better than none. I’m just a little kid. I went on to call 2 of my coworkers mom and another one my nurse since she previously worked in health care. I whined and cried to those people after my coffee spilled and for a couple other catastrophes (such as sanitizer bottle falling apart).

I'm just weirded out by the male coworker who looked at me weird. Why would ANYONE look at me weird? I'm just a child (at least emotionally). If I don't be catered to, I get scared and terrified of everything.
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Question • Score: 9 • Views: 6,339 • Replies: 115

 
maxdancona
 
  4  
Reply Sat 14 Apr, 2018 08:01 pm
@darkangel1720,
I don't know anything about your office. If a co-worker spilled coffee, I wouldn't pay any attention. It would not be a big deal to me. If I spilled coffee, I would simply clean it up and go on with work. If someone noticed... I would probably make a joke about it ("I guess I needed that coffee") and then go back to doing my work.

I don't know if this helps or not. Generally people don't want any emotions at work. We just want to do our jobs... emotions are for friends and family.

If you are experiencing strong emotions at work, you might want to consider therapy (which is a good way to learn to manage emotions anywhere).



0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  6  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 12:37 am
@darkangel1720,
You can't have it both ways. On other threads you're complaining about being treated differently by line managers, and now you're insisting on being treated differently. This is attention seeking.

People go to work to earn a living, not put up with your peculiar idiosyncrasies and stalking. You carry on behaving like this and you'll be sacked again.
Ponderer
 
  -4  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 02:29 am
@izzythepush,
Back off
0 Replies
 
darkangel1720
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 04:56 am
@izzythepush,
I didn’t used to be this way until a few weeks ago. I used to be way more emotionally mature. But dealing with my fast food supervisor turning on me has taken its toll. You read my other thread so u know I’m a victim. My fast food supervisor got mad bc I looked up to her. She reacted positively to other ppl looking up to her. I endured it for the past 6 months since I was canned from that restaurant.

A few weeks ago was the start of my mental and emotional breakdown. I regressed to being a little kid emotionally and I’m helpless to stop it. I’m glad all my coworkers are older than me (like by a whole generation). There’s only a couple of them that’s younger.

I been at this job for over 5 years. The guy who looked at me weird been there for 4 years. The ladies who gave me sympathy are fairly new (less than a year). It’s funny how someone who been there so long wouldn’t understand. Then again, he’s a guy. Besides, no one ever seen me like this before.
izzythepush
 
  3  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 10:19 am
@darkangel1720,
Your supervisor didn't turn on you, she reacted to your stalking. If you're a victim it's down to your behaviour, it's something you need to change.
0 Replies
 
neptuneblue
 
  3  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 12:52 pm
@darkangel1720,
Victims are people who had bad things happen through no fault of their own. You are NOT a victim because you didn't listen to your supervisor and you got fired because of your blatant disregard of the instructions given to you.

You are not a little kid, either. You're old enough to hold a full time job. Most people can overlook certain behaviors such as spilling coffee. Some will volunteer to help clean up, others will tell you where to find the cleaning supplies and others will plain just ignore you.

Whining and crying is not an expected behavior in the work environment. Keeping your emotions under control is part of learning how to get along with others. You've shown you are having a hard time with that. You need to focus more on your work and less on your feelings.

Again, your over the top behavior has caused another incident that can potentially end your employment. Showing empathy for you is normal, but to "cater" to your every whim just isn't going to happen.
darkangel1720
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 02:21 pm
@neptuneblue,
I behaved appropriately at this job until my mental breakdown a few weeks ago. My fast food supervisor hurt me and I was acting out everywhere else. I need a safe place to cry at the drop of every hat.
PUNKEY
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 03:55 pm
@darkangel1720,
If YOU feel spilling coffee is devastating , then that’s what matters.

Can you describe why you have this level of feeling at this time?

What did you feel when your cat died?
Ponderer
 
  -4  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 04:32 pm
@PUNKEY,
One
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  0  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 05:09 pm
@PUNKEY,
PUNKEY wrote:


What did you feel when your cat died?


Cat?

For ya'll who are taking this OP seriously, go read his other threads.

This person claims he has a therapist, but I seriously doubt it.
Ponderer
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 05:18 pm
@chai2,
I thought the questions referred to the relative pain of a cat dying to the emotional impact of what was probably public humiliation of spilling coffee.
(enhanced by feelings of rejection)
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 08:58 pm
@Ponderer,
This makes no sense.

A cat has not been mentioned anywhere.

Punkey has a habit of not reading carefully, and talks about things that were not discussed.

The pain of a cat dying? Well, if a person hated cats, that would be no pain at all, wouldn't it?
What is this? Throw a noun in a sentence and wonder how someone would respond?

In any event....

1. Spilling a cup of coffee is not a public humiliation.
2. This person has serious problems, or is a troll. Read the thread via the link below.

https://able2know.org/topic/448964-1
Ponderer
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 09:37 pm
@chai2,
1.OK. Perceived feelings of public humiliation enhanced by feelings of rejection
2. This person wrote to able2know admitting emotional turmoil and seeking
compassion, understanding, and help, not criticism and ridicule.
Ponderer
 
  -4  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 09:40 pm
Next?
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  3  
Reply Mon 16 Apr, 2018 01:07 am
@darkangel1720,
darkangel1720 wrote:

I behaved appropriately at this job until my mental breakdown a few weeks ago.


This is the bit I find hard to understand. You behaved appropriately here yet continued your stalkerish behaviour elsewhere. If that's true, (which I doubt,) you can behave appropriately and need to keep doing so if you don't want to lose this one too.

There's a world of difference between asking for a bit of space because you feel overwhelmed by emotion and insisting everyone runs round after you when the tiniest thing happens to upset you.

The first is something everyone has had to do at some point, the second is attention seeking.
0 Replies
 
vikorr
 
  3  
Reply Mon 16 Apr, 2018 01:09 am
@darkangel1720,
Quote:
You read my other thread so u know I’m a victim.
No, you are not.
Quote:
I regressed to being a little kid emotionally and I’m helpless to stop it.
No, you are not.
----------------------------------------------------------------
It is fine being a little bit different. It's fine not relating to other people. It's fine missing social cues...until it negatively impacts the workplace (because the boss is paying you to be productive, not destructive). When this happens, if we have the ability to improve (ie we are not mentally impaired) it is incumbent on us as productive adults to improve ourselves by:
- learning what about our social behaviour is upsetting others
- stopping unacceptable social behaviour
- implementing acceptable social behaviour.

You refuse to do this.

Same with mental health. Our mind is somewhere between 85-95% habit. They are habits we develop, whether consciously or unconcsioulsy. We can all start putting in place healthier habits. Habits includes:
- beliefs and values
- coping mechanisms
- stories we tell ourselves
- emotional meanings that we place on things or events (eg. that's where @@@@ died, I don't like !!!! anymore, because I associate it with @@@@'s death)
- positivity (or negativitity).
- calmness and consideration
- etc

Every single one of those is able to be practised. You are not helpless with regards to your mental health.

The other thing people don't realise about their mental health is that whenever they break their values/beliefs, their sense of identity/self diminishes. When they stay true to their values/beliefs their sense of self increases.

The same is true for standing up for yourself/your values/your self esteem....if you don't your sense of self diminishes, while if you do your sense of self increases. As an example of how important this is, almost all people who were happy people - who became downtrodden in relationships (as in, low self esteem, low confidence, depression etc), haven't appropriately stood up for themselves enough. This part is as important as being true to yourself (and is part of being true to yourself)
----------------------------------------------

Long term, things will only start on a path of ongoing growth as an adult, if you take responsibility for who you are, and start working on improving yourself. Nor would choosing to do so single you out - every person alive is capable of growth. Some fortunate people choose to grow as a person for the rest of their life, and do so.

It is your choice.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  3  
Reply Mon 16 Apr, 2018 01:15 am
@Ponderer,
Either you're a much nicer person than everyone else or a sanctimonious arsehole quick to criticise those who don't live up to your exacting standards. In any event DarkAngel has found another gullible idiot to drain emotionally. (Make sure you give her your mobile number so she can phone you at 3am when she gets a hangnail.)
vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Apr, 2018 01:19 am
By the way, I would suggest you read 'Mans Search for Meaning' by Vicktor Frankl. Now there was a true victim...but he chose not to refer to himself as such.

He experienced a great deal more degridation, bullying, loss of health etc than you ever have...and he chose how he wanted to handle it.

He was a jew interned in the german death camps.

It's a short read, and it puts a new light on a lot of the 'problems' that we complain about, and how we go about handling them.
0 Replies
 
Ponderer
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 16 Apr, 2018 03:14 am
@izzythepush,
Well, thank you Izzy. I try. But honestly, I have met people that I considered to be much nicer than myself.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
  1. Forums
  2. » Is it emotionally devastating to accidentally spill coffee at work?
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.06 seconds on 05/05/2021 at 09:04:26