27
   

Why I left the Democratic Party

 
 
maporsche
 
  3  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2018 06:41 am
I’m really very interested in seeing this election result in Maine today. Maine went to ranked choice voting which I think would be a wonderful change for our country to make in every election.

This will be a great test and should let us know some pros and cons and what may need to be adjusted.


Ranked choice voting would allow 3rd parties to exist in our system and possibly be successful.
Lash
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2018 08:23 am
@maporsche,
Mahporsche and the elitists here and elsewhere pushed trump to the presidency. Bernie and progressives are working hard for policies that will jerk this country out of the hands of oligarchs and return us to some semblance of democracy.

Our country has been perverted. It will never get better for minorities or the middle class until we change leadership and direction.

If you aren't a progressive, you are part of the problem.

Vote progressive.
revelette1
 
  3  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2018 08:28 am
@maporsche,
I was interested in what you posted about Maine, I am always a little behind it seems, so I looked it up. Interesting. Why would democrats be for it and republicans against it? I like it because I could have voted for both Hillary and Bernie last primary, with Hillary being ranked first.

Maine set for groundbreaking voting experiment on Tuesday
revelette1
 
  2  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2018 08:29 am
@Lash,
Yawn
Lash
 
  -3  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2018 08:31 am
@revelette1,
Congratulations on not making any logical, historical, or spelling mistakes in that riveting post!

No biblical chapter and verse for that, Sister Armchair?
maporsche
 
  3  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2018 08:36 am
@revelette1,
I don’t want to presume why Republicans would be against it. I’m hoping o hear from a couple of them.

I’ve seen articles that say statistically conservatives are more resistant to change in general, so maybe it’s a bit of that.

Thanks for your article. I post from my phone most often now and it’s a bunch of extra steps to find links and such.
revelette1
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2018 08:38 am
@Lash,
And here I thought you was ignoring me. Shucks, now I can't talk behind your back.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2018 08:41 am
Woooohooooo!!!!
Be there or be square.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/bernie-sanders-face-donald-trump-185047787.html?soc_src=hl-viewer&soc_trk=fb

Excerpt:

Bernie Sanders will Face Donald Trump in 2020 Election, Democrats Say
Nicole Goodkind

NewsweekNovember 24, 2017
The 2020 presidential election is Senator Bernie Sanders’ race to lose, according to a new survey of more than a dozen top Democratic strategists.

The survey, conducted by The Hill, reveals a Democratic field crowded with old faces. At a time when the party could use some fresh blood, most contenders for commander-in-chief have been around for decades. Sanders, who will be 79 years old in 2020, currently leads the pack.

The 2020 presidential election is Senator Bernie Sanders’ race to lose, according to a new survey of more than a dozen top Democratic strategists.

The survey, conducted by The Hill, reveals a Democratic field crowded with old faces. At a time when the party could use some fresh blood, most contenders for commander-in-chief have been around for decades. Sanders, who will be 79 years old in 2020, currently leads the pack.
Olivier5
 
  6  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2018 10:07 am
@Lash,
I think that race would make a lot of political sense. But who are you going to support then? :-)
Lash
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2018 10:10 am
@Olivier5,
Decisions, decisions!!!
0 Replies
 
Real Music
 
  4  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2018 05:08 pm
@Lash,
Quote:
The 2020 presidential election is Senator Bernie Sanders’ race to lose, according to a new survey of more than a dozen top Democratic strategists.

Remember the experts said the same thing about Hillary, when Barack Obama won the nomination. We still don't know which candidates or what type of candidates will be running for the nomination. We have to wait and see and let the primary process play itself out. I too believe that Bernie presently is one the early favorites to win the nomination. If he does win the nomination that would be great. I still want to see who the other candidates are, before deciding who I prefer. I also want to wait to see how each candidate does in the primary before deciding who I prefer.
Real Music
 
  2  
Reply Tue 12 Jun, 2018 05:24 pm
@maporsche,
Quote:
maporsche wrote to edgarblythe

Maybe you’ll get a second chance to help Trump get elected by voting third party. Wouldn’t that be fun for all of us?

Preventing
that from happening should be the top priority of all democrats, all progressives, all liberals, all left of center, and all center left voters.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  0  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2018 03:56 am
@Real Music,
I’m on your side re people making that decision rather than having it rammed down their throats by s corrupt political party.

The article is saying at this point, the people prefer Bern, not that the anti-democratic superdelegates have already been bought by him.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2018 07:20 am
Hillary's winning strategy was,
1. Rig the primaries
2. Promote Trump's nomination
3. Run on no changes needed
4. Remind folks "It's my turn"
5. I'm not Trump
maporsche
 
  3  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2018 07:38 am
@maporsche,
So it looks like no one in Maine on the democratic side got 50% of the vote, so we get to see how ranked voting will play out.

The republican side the winner (Moody) got 56%, so no one's 2nd ranked votes will come into play.

https://www.vox.com/2018/6/12/17451174/live-results-maine-governor-and-house-primary-elections-2018-midterms
0 Replies
 
revelette1
 
  0  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2018 07:51 am
@maporsche,
Quote:
Nothing is officially over yet in Maine, but ranked-choice voting is probably here to stay. Question 1, a referendum to keep the new form of vote-counting, is currently passing by double digits. It doesn’t look like ranked-choice voting will even factor into the Republican primary for governor or Democratic primary for the 2nd Congressional District, in which Shawn Moody and Jared Golden, respectively, appear to have captured outright majorities. But we’ll get to see ranked-choice voting in action in the Democratic primary for governor next week, when the secretary of state counts and reallocates all the second-, third-, etc. place votes.


For more on the primary go here. This was as of last night but I like to read their take on elections and politics.
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  4  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2018 08:57 am
@maporsche,
maporsche wrote:

I don’t want to presume why Republicans would be against it. I’m hoping o hear from a couple of them.

In Maine, Republican candidates have repeatedly benefited from divisions on the center-left. In both 2006 and 2010, Republican Governors were elected with just 38% of the vote against a divided field, so first-past-the-post has worked very well for the GOP. Ranked choice voting is a threat, since it would allow centre-left voters to pool their vote. That's why Gov LePage has fought its introduction tooth and nail, and even threatened not to certify the results of these primaries.
0 Replies
 
revelette1
 
  2  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2018 09:02 am
Quote:
Wisconsin Democrats just picked up a Republican-held state legislature seats in a duo of special elections on Tuesday, serving yet another wake-up call to Republicans in the state.

Democrat Caleb Frostman, the former head of the Door County Economic Development Corp, won northeastern Wisconsin’s First Senate District, which voted for Donald Trump by a whopping 17 points in 2016. Frostman’s seat will be up for reelection again in November.

This is undoubtedly a victory for the state’s Democratic Party, in the third Wisconsin state election this year that has left Republicans sounding alarm bells. In January, Democrats flipped a rural Trump +17 state district with a comfortable 10-point margin of victory — a loss Wisconsin’s Republican Gov. Scott Walker, who is also up for reelection this year, called “a wake-up call for Republicans in Wisconsin.” Liberals also won a seat on the Wisconsin Supreme Court by a huge margin in April.

Tuesday’s victory will fill a seat that has been vacant since December, when Walker appointed then-sitting Republican Frank Lasee to his administration. Walker also appointed former state Rep. Keith Ripp, a seat that a Republican picked up Tuesday. At the time Walker refused to schedule the special elections, which many speculated was out of worry that Republicans might lose. But in March, the state courts mandated the contests be scheduled.

It appears as though Walker’s concerns were founded. In a state that was so crucial to Trump’s 2016 victory and where Democrats have a vulnerable senator up for reelection this fall, Tuesday’s special election is an indication that Democrats are enthusiastic to get out to the polls.

Democrats have outperformed in Trump-era elections — but they have some big contests coming up.

There’s a lot of debate about how much weight to put on state-level special elections. After all, they represent a very small group of voters and are by their very nature “special.” It’s hard to prognosticate any 2018 midterm election outcomes from those races alone.

But there’s no question that Democrats have outperformed in Trump-era elections across the country, even in races they’ve lost. They’ve claimed a Senate seat in the deeply red state of Alabama, won a Trump +18 House district in Pennsylvania, and even came close in a race in an Arizona Republican stronghold — there have already been a lot of signs of a possible “blue wave.” We’ve also seen this on the state level, as Vox’s Andrew Prokop summarized:

In the 74 special elections for both state legislatures and Congress across the country since Trump won that they tracked, Democrats performed, on average, 11 points better than they did in those areas in the 2016 presidential election.

While the average movement was in Democrats’ favor, there was a fair amount of variation. In 49 of those races, the Democratic candidate’s margin was better than Hillary Clinton’s in 2016. In 23 races, the Republican candidate did better than Trump. In the other two, it was about a tie.

Democrats aren’t just running up the score in already-blue areas. The party made many of its biggest improvements over the 2016 presidential in districts Trump won in the South and Midwest. This goes to show that the 2016 elections don’t at all seem to have heralded doom for Democrats in regions that tipped to Trump — in fact, it’s many Republican-held seats in those regions that suddenly seem to be flipping to Democrats for the first time in years.


More at: Vox
cicerone imposter
 
  3  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2018 10:38 am
@revelette1,
I'm happy to see more republican seats being taken over by democrats. I don't even understand why the GOP can win any seat when their goal is to take away social security and Medicare to give bigger tax cuts to the rich.
Real Music
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jun, 2018 10:51 am
@edgarblythe,
Quote:
Hillary's winning strategy was,
1. Rig the primaries
2. Promote Trump's nomination
3. Run on no changes needed

4. Remind folks "It's my turn"
5. I'm not Trump

I don't necessarily believe that 1,2, and 3 actually happened.
But, I do agree that 4 and 5 actually happened.
Because Hillary actually did do 4 and 5 may have weekend her candidacy with some of Bernie supporters.
I just hope Bernie doesn't make the same mistake of doing 4 and 5.
Bernie needs to go out and earn the nomination just like any other potential candidate. If he wins the nomination, it will be because he earned it in the primaries. None of the candidates should be running on the "it's my turn" strategy. I believe Bernie would have been a great president. I also believe that Hillary would have been a great president. In my personal opinion, I believe that Hillary had turned off many Bernie supporters because she ran her campaign on the "it's my turn" strategy. I hope Bernie doesn't make the same mistake Hillary made. It's not anyone's turn. It has to be earned.
 

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