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Why I left the Democratic Party

 
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Jul, 2018 11:18 am
@maporsche,
It's horrible in California because of the high cost of living, most of which applies to housing cost. Our modest 3 bedroom home is valued around $2 million. Even people making six figures here in Silicon Valley have problems trying to buy a home here. Almost everything else cost more here in Silicon Valley. We're fortunate only because we moved here in the mid-1970's when home prices were reasonable. After the hi-tech boom, housing cost went crazy because supply did not keep up with demand. Here's one example from 2012. I do not believe much has changed.
Quote:
Dick Karp
Dick Karp, Computer nerd who became a manager and is now enjoying life, the universe, and everything.
Answered Jul 29, 2012
All included (social security, medicare, federal income tax, state income tax, disability insurance), about 30% of a 90k salary would go for tax if you rent, a bit less if you buy a house (but then you will have to pay property taxes). In addition there would be sales tax at about 8 1/2% on most non-grocery items you buy and gasoline tax of about 40 cents a gallon on auto fuel.
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https://spectrum.ieee.org/view-from-the-valley/at-work/tech-careers/what-silicon-valley-tech-jobs-pay-the-highest-salaries
maporsche
 
  2  
Reply Mon 30 Jul, 2018 11:58 am
@cicerone imposter,
There seem to be plenty of reasonably priced homes (for someone making six figures) in the Oakland Area (just 30-40 minutes away according to google maps). I live in Chicago and while it's not a crazy as San Francisco, there are plenty of places for people to live.

You're not going to see me have much sympathy for people making six figures CI (I'm in that group and I don't expect people to have much sympathy for me either).

It is not horrible living in California for the vast majority of people (rich and near poverty - people near poverty have it much worse in many other states). People are still moving there and the population is still growing.
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Mon 30 Jul, 2018 08:08 pm
@maporsche,
I've lived in Chicago and Naperville, so I know of what you speak. My favorite is still here in Silicon Valley, because of the safe environment, the moderate climate, and our ability to live here where many of our neighbors work in the hi tech industry, and we also have young families. We have our share of public parks and a couple of public libraries.
Quote:
Sunnyvale, CA - Parks
sunnyvale.ca.gov › Recreation and Community
Enjoy Sunnyvale's Parks. Sunnyvale's park system includes 772 acres of parks and open space located in neighborhoods throughout the City. Many of our parks include picnic areas, playgrounds and sports fields or facilities.
My wife and I go to the city parks to walk for our constitutional several times a week. https://smartasset.com/mortgage/safest-cities-in-america
We're planning on staying here for the duration.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Wed 8 Aug, 2018 08:30 am
https://www.seattletimes.com/nation-world/5-take-aways-from-tuesdays-election-results/

they're copied a piece from the NYT

Quote:

By ALEXANDER BURNS
The New York Times
1. Suburbanites are more fired up than rural voters: The most significant harbinger from the Ohio race may not be the narrow margin, but the turnout gap between the most and least heavily populated parts of a district that absorbs the close-in suburbs of Columbus and rural stretches of central Ohio.

In both Franklin County, which includes Columbus, and Delaware County, the fast-growing suburb just north of Ohio’s capital, 42 percent of voters turned out. But in the five more lightly populated counties that round out the district, turnout ranged from 27 to 32 percent.


This is an ominous sign for Republicans: The highest-income and best-educated elements of the electorate — those deeply uneasy with President Donald Trump — are showing the most interest in voting. Defending a few dozen districts that are either more heavily urban or feature a similar demographic mix as Ohio’s 12th District, Republicans will need to find a way to win back suburbanites or better galvanize rural voters. If they do not, their House majority will slip away.

2. The revolution was not televised: The activist wing of the Democratic Party mobilized for several of the night’s biggest races, trying to replicate the insurgent victory of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in New York earlier this summer — and for the most part falling short.

In Michigan, Abdul El-Sayed, a youthful candidate for governor backed by Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., lost a primary by about 20 percentage points to Gretchen Whitmer, a former Democratic leader in the state Legislature. And in Missouri, Rep. William Lacy Clay turned back a challenge from Cori Bush, who campaigned alongside Ocasio-Cortez and framed her candidacy in similar terms.

The left still displayed real political force: El-Sayed and Bush both won more than 30 percent of the primary vote as underdog candidates.

But the night was, on the whole, a display of strength by more conventional Democrats and a reminder that Democratic primary voters across the country are not necessarily motivated chiefly by liberal ideology.

3. Conor Lambs do not grow on trees: When Democrats captured a special House election in Pennsylvania earlier this year, they did so with a candidate who hailed from a well-known local political family, served as a Marine and did a stint as a federal prosecutor. Tall, clean-cut and proud to show off his skills with a rifle, Rep. Conor Lamb “looked the part,” as Trump likes to say.

Running in somewhat of a less forbidding district in Ohio on Tuesday, Danny O’Connor, a 31-year-old county official, was hailed by Democrats for mounting a strong campaign. But he was no Conor Lamb. O’Connor took a vacation out of the country after winning the primary this year, as some local Democrats noted.

Far more important, he just did not have the sort of compelling biography that Lamb wielded. That may have made only a small difference, but it could prove decisive in an election that may be decided by fewer than 1,000 votes after absentee and provisional ballots are counted. Even in a turbocharged environment such as this for Democrats, candidates still matter.

4. Women break through in governors’ races: Whitmer was not the only woman to claim a major-party nomination for governor Tuesday night. In Kansas, Democrats selected Laura Kelly, a state senator, to compete for the governorship in a red state where Republican strife may have created a political opening for Democrats.

Their victories bring to 11 the number of women nominated for governorships this year — a breakthrough in a political arena, executive offices, that has been especially unfriendly to women in the past.


In some places, like Georgia and Maine, female candidates nominated this year could be the first women ever elected to lead their states. But that would not be the case in Michigan and Kansas: In both states, women have served as governors in the past. And in Kansas, Kelly won her primary with the help of one such former governor, Kathleen Sebelius, who supported her candidacy forcefully.

5. It was a big night for labor: After years of successive defeats across the Midwest, labor unions asserted themselves convincingly Tuesday night.

In Michigan, powerful unions led by the United Automobile Workers helped secure the Democratic gubernatorial nomination for Whitmer. And in Missouri, voters struck down a law that barred private-sector unions from collecting mandatory dues from workers who decline to become union members. The Missouri vote was a lopsided win for labor, with about two in three voters opposing the right-to-work law.

If the results were encouraging for unions, their bigger test will come in November, when candidates like Whitmer give them a chance to reclaim some power in states like Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin, where Republicans have controlled government for the better part of a decade and repeatedly used it to curtail union power.


ALEXANDER BURNS


not sure about some of his conclusions as counts/recounts are going to be happening for a while in a couple of the races he covers but interesting none the less
Finn dAbuzz
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 15 Aug, 2018 11:06 am
@maporsche,
Here maporche, you need to factor in cost of living

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-jackson-california-poverty-20180114-story.html
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Thu 16 Aug, 2018 11:01 am
@Finn dAbuzz,
I'm sure California has our share of people living in poverty, but we're also the sixth largest economy in the world. I think any large city, state or country, there will always be a portion of the people living in poverty except for countries like Sweden. California's population is closing in on 40 million people with a diverse economy. Those who live in Silicon Valley, the cost of living is very high, but the hi tech industry pays some of the highest salaries in the country. Cost of living is a very important issue for many in our area. Many retired people are moving out of the area to places with more moderate cost of living. Our humble home has a market value around $2 million. We wouldn't be able to buy our own home.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  -3  
Reply Fri 17 Aug, 2018 11:11 am
@cicerone imposter,
You should try and recall this forgiving attitude when next your rant about red states.
Baldimo
 
  -2  
Reply Fri 17 Aug, 2018 02:29 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Don't forget to factor in the additional cost of having new solar panels added to every new home and building instruction high sales and property taxes. Nothing like making housing affordable for the masses...
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Fri 17 Aug, 2018 04:00 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
I don't rant about red states. I really don't care what other states or countries are doing. I'm content in retirement living in one of the safest cities in this country. https://www.cbsnews.com/media/the-9-safest-cities-in-america/10/
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Sat 18 Aug, 2018 12:20 pm
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:

I don't rant about red states.


Maybe you've taken The Pledge recently but I'm quite sure a mining of your past posts will prove otherwise.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 18 Aug, 2018 12:36 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Finn dAbuzz wrote:
but I'm quite sure a mining of your past posts will prove otherwise.


got anything to back this up?

I don't recall Tak ranting about other US states and we've all known him a long time. He's usually pretty enthusiastic about other states and cities. Obviously not as enthusiastic as about his home but still.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  3  
Reply Sat 18 Aug, 2018 01:39 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
FYI, I have visited many of the states in the US and also many countries (over 80 by my last count) including China and Russia. There isn't one place I have visited that I disliked. World travel has been a passion of mine. Why would I hate any US state?
Finn dAbuzz
 
  5  
Reply Sun 19 Aug, 2018 09:02 am
@cicerone imposter,
I don’t have evidence to substantiate my recollection and I’m not willing to comb through prior posts searching for it and so I should not have made the claim. I withdraw it and apologize to you.
cicerone imposter
 
  3  
Reply Sun 19 Aug, 2018 01:32 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
No need to apologize. We post our opinions, and most are not going to be agreeable to many and most people just don't bother.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Aug, 2018 11:46 am
@cicerone imposter,
Thanks
0 Replies
 
camlok
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2018 08:12 am
@cicerone imposter,
Quote:
I'm content in retirement living in one of the safest cities in this country.


Sounds like the words/feelings of a death camp guard.

"While my government daily slaughters others, steals their wealth, I am content and happy."
0 Replies
 
mysteryman841
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2018 09:34 am
@cicerone imposter,
Like you, I am living out my retirement in a town so safe we only have 1 cop, in a county so safe that there are only 6 deputies.
Union county is a very safe place to live, good climate, low cost of living, good people.
Even though I am a Ca native, I cant imagine living anywhere else but here.
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2018 09:43 am
@mysteryman841,
It's good that anyone can find a place to live and feel comfortable whether one is still working or retired.
camlok
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2018 10:35 am
@cicerone imposter,
Quote:
It's good that anyone can find a place to live and feel comfortable whether one is still working or retired.


Thinking people would believe that includes Iraqis, Afghans, Libyans, Syrians, Cambodians, Cubans, Laotians, Indonesians, Guatemalans, Nicaraguans, Haitians, Greeks, the people of the former Yugoslavia, ... .
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Aug, 2018 04:42 pm
@camlok,
You are troubled. Get help
 

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