23
   

McCain shows his true character and leadership

 
 
nimh
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 09:36 am
@McGentrix,
Yes, I know you're not much of a fan of sarcastic, snarky and/or disparaging one-liners, McGentrix.

{ahem}
McGentrix
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 09:39 am
@nimh,
I am glad to see you realize that.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 09:44 am
McCain made a big deal ot of cancelling the debate until the economic bail-out fiasco blows over. Well, truth be told, he's been absent from Congress and he's not voted more than once in the last 6 months. What a phoney!

"Obama rebuffed his GOP rival on the debate proposal, saying the next president needs to "deal with more than one thing at once."
H2O MAN
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 09:49 am
Quote:
McCain shows his true character and leadership


America should be proud of McCain.
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 09:54 am
Even Bill O'Reilly sees McCain's decision as purely an electoral-strategical one, driven by bad polling.

Discussing McCain's move, O'Reilly doesnt even try on an argument about how it's good for the nation to suspend the campaign, or how McCain is showing leadership - he just explains how McCain's move is simply a bold attampt to counter bad polling. Just politicking, then.

Quote:
Talking Points
Thursday, September 25, 2008
By Bill O'Reilly

Reacting to polls showing Americans are furious about the economic meltdown, John McCain wants to postpone Friday's debate and is heading back to Washington to involve himself in the bailout process.

Now that's a smart move. By suspending his campaign for a few days, McCain is trying to make himself part of the solution, because right now many Americans see him as part of the problem.

Wednesday, the initial economic meltdown polls rolled in, and they're good news for Barack Obama. [..] A new FOX News/Opinion Dynamics poll says Obama now leads McCain by six points nationwide. Two weeks ago, McCain was ahead by three points. When asked who is better suited to handle the economy, Obama leads by 10 points.

The daily tracking polls by Gallup and Rasmussen are closer. But there's no question the chaos from Wall Street is helping Senator Obama at this point. So McCain is making a bold move. Whether it will work, of course, remains to be seen.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 09:59 am
@Ragman,
Ragman, I think I read someplace that McCain missed voting over 600 times. Now, it's urgent for him to be in Washington DC.

Without knowing him and his background, many conservatives are rationalizing his actions to now be in Washington DC. They can't see through McCain's motivation to win votes, not his ability to do anything about this crisis.
CoastalRat
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 10:06 am
@cicerone imposter,
Anything to win votes? Of course he will. Just as Obama will do and say anything that he thinks will help him win votes. That's what politicians mostly do.
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 10:09 am
@CoastalRat,
Ofcourse; but there's a huge difference between the Obama rhetoric and the McCain rhetoric. If you can't decipher between the two and determine for yourself who tells the truth more often, that's your problem.

McCain said just last week "our economy is sound." Your response?
CoastalRat
 
  3  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 10:23 am
@cicerone imposter,
I don't keep score to know which one lies more often. Or misspeaks more often. It is a totally useless waste of time to do so because it really doesn't matter what the score is on that account. If you don't think your man Obama lies at least nearly as much as McCain in order to win votes then my arguing that point with you would also be a waste of time, so pardon me for not being drawn into that one.

As far as his "believing" the economy is sound comment from last week, since I didn't hear it and do not know the context it was spoken in, I cannot honestly comment on it.
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 10:25 am
@CoastalRat,
That's what happens when one doesn't have any interest to understand where each candidate is coming from. Most voters are like you.
CoastalRat
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 10:25 am
@cicerone imposter,
If you say so.
Cycloptichorn
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 10:28 am
@CoastalRat,
CoastalRat wrote:

I don't keep score to know which one lies more often. Or misspeaks more often. It is a totally useless waste of time to do so because it really doesn't matter what the score is on that account. If you don't think your man Obama lies at least nearly as much as McCain in order to win votes then my arguing that point with you would also be a waste of time, so pardon me for not being drawn into that one.

As far as his "believing" the economy is sound comment from last week, since I didn't hear it and do not know the context it was spoken in, I cannot honestly comment on it.


How about if we hunt it down for ya? Would that allow you to comment on it? 'cause he said it, in a speech, Monday of last week, unprompted by any question or anything. Until he changed his mind a few days later, that is.

Cycloptichorn
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 10:29 am
@CoastalRat,
It's only my observation and opinion; it's only one, so you can take "comfort" in that.
candidone1
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 10:30 am
I'm not sure how anyone can discuss politics, or even vote, if they don't care who lies more.
That looks to me like your mind is made up based on party affiliation before any candidates are even put up.
Lying often isn't like having sex too much, or preferring a Shiraz over a Merlot....those things don't matter. But the frequency of lying really should be considered when analyzing a candidate.
CoastalRat
 
  3  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 10:42 am
@candidone1,
Don't jump to conclusions based on a comment that I don't care who lies more. I don't care. The fact that they (politicians) lie in order to grab votes is disgusting to me. An intelligent voter needs to sort through the rhetoric and lies and determine which candidate is best for the job.

If I were a betting man, I would bet that 95% of everyone on here will vote for the candidate of the party they are affiliated with regardless of who is running. That's why I happily stood up for those who complained to BPB about his stance of not voting for Obama. The talk seemed to be that he should vote for him simply because he was the democrat nominee. Well, sorry, I don't think that way. I have voted for democrats in the past. I have voted for republicans in the past. And I've chosen to vote for an independent in the past if I could not find something to like in neither party's candidate. So I guess you can say in this instance, you are wrong in your comment you aimed at me. Which is fine, since you don't know me well enough to know better.

As far as frequency of lying mattering, well, a liar is a liar. Once you have established the fact that you will lie to get what you want, frequency no longer really matters.
CoastalRat
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 10:50 am
@cicerone imposter,
A person's opinion about me really makes no difference to me. Especially an opinion from someone who has never met me and with whom I've never shared a drink or a story. So your observational opinion of my political acumen is of no concern to me and not worth trying to convince you otherwise. Thus my earlier comment.
0 Replies
 
old europe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 10:52 am
@CoastalRat,
CoastalRat wrote:
If I were a betting man, I would bet that 95% of everyone on here will vote for the candidate of the party they are affiliated with regardless of who is running. That's why I happily stood up for those who complained to BPB about his stance of not voting for Obama. The talk seemed to be that he should vote for him simply because he was the democrat nominee. Well, sorry, I don't think that way.


It didn't seem like that to me. It seemed the argument was mostly that Hillary's platform and Obama's platform were similar enough to support the other one if he/she happened the one to be nominated.

In fact, that seems to be a bit of a contradiction to what you're making it out to be. It wasn't like people argued that, hey, it doesn't matter whether Kucinich or Obama gets the nomination - it's a Democrat, so vote for him already. Not at all. It was rather the opposite: people pointing out the similarities in the respective platforms rather than arguing that platforms don't matter. And, unless you have a very specific reason not to vote for a candidate, it would actually make sense to support the other candidate.

Along the same lines, I could see why somebody could make a reasonable argument why he would support either McCain or Romney, but not Tancredo.

Doesn't necessarily have to do with blind partisanship and merely voting by party affiliation.
0 Replies
 
CoastalRat
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 10:56 am
@Cycloptichorn,
Well, at least someone comes back with something constructive rather than making an assumption of my political smarts.

I had heard of course that McCain had made this comment, but I have not taken the time to investigate it since I doubt it would make a difference on how I am going to vote. (Right now, honestly, I am undecided between McCain and Barr. I will not under any circumstance vote for Obama because there is too much I don't like about his politics.) Anyway, if you really would like my comment, then yeah, you're gonna have to get me the comment in context. So feel free to do so and I will get back to this topic and gladly comment on it.

Catch ya later Cy.

Cycloptichorn
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 10:59 am
@CoastalRat,
CoastalRat wrote:

Well, at least someone comes back with something constructive rather than making an assumption of my political smarts.

I had heard of course that McCain had made this comment, but I have not taken the time to investigate it since I doubt it would make a difference on how I am going to vote. (Right now, honestly, I am undecided between McCain and Barr. I will not under any circumstance vote for Obama because there is too much I don't like about his politics.) Anyway, if you really would like my comment, then yeah, you're gonna have to get me the comment in context. So feel free to do so and I will get back to this topic and gladly comment on it.

Catch ya later Cy.


Well, I've always thought you were a smart and independent guy - as much as anyone is.

I think it's fair to say that while all politicians are liars, the question of degree is a valid one Smile

Cycloptichorn
CoastalRat
 
  4  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 11:06 am
@Cycloptichorn,
Quote:
I think it's fair to say that while all politicians are liars, the question of degree is a valid one


To some people it may well be. And if so, that is fine. Everyone has their own set of criteria for deciding how to vote. It's just that to me, keeping score on who is lying more is disengenuous since it will not affect my decision since I believe they all lie on a regular basis.

I would ask this of anyone who says that lying matters to them. If you keep score and it turns out that Obama is found to be lying more than McCain, would you suddenly see the light and vote for McCain? I submit that none of you Obama supporters would. (Nor would the McCain supporters, by the way.) That being the case, counting lies is simply a fool's game.
 

Related Topics

Obama '08? - Discussion by sozobe
Let's get rid of the Electoral College - Discussion by Robert Gentel
McCain's VP: - Discussion by Cycloptichorn
McCain is blowing his election chances. - Discussion by McGentrix
Food Stamp Turkeys - Discussion by H2O MAN
The 2008 Democrat Convention - Discussion by Lash
Snowdon is a dummy - Discussion by cicerone imposter
GAFFNEY: Whose side is Obama on? - Discussion by gungasnake
 
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 09/22/2019 at 12:40:29