73
   

english to latin phrase translation

 
 
Bishop2013
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Apr, 2012 03:50 pm
@George,
@George
Thank you so very much for you help.
0 Replies
 
Penguin90
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Apr, 2012 07:52 am
@George

If you could please Translate this for me... I tried translating it myself from what I've learned but I don't think I got it right...

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players:
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts,

This is how I've translated it...

Omnis mundi scaena,
Et omnes viri et mulieres tantum histriones:
Habent exitus et introitus;
Ludit et in pluribus partibus temporis,

I would really appreciate it... Thanks in advance... Smile
George
 
  2  
Reply Mon 30 Apr, 2012 08:12 pm
@Penguin90,
Penguin90 wrote:

@George

If you could please Translate this for me... I tried translating it myself from what I've learned but I don't think I got it right...

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players:
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts,

This is how I've translated it...

Omnis mundi scaena,
Et omnes viri et mulieres tantum histriones:
Habent exitus et introitus;
Ludit et in pluribus partibus temporis,

I would really appreciate it... Thanks in advance... Smile

Just some suggestions . . .

I think I'd go with Totus mundus rather than Omnes mundi, based on the
motto of the Globe"Totus mundus agit histrionem".

I've seen femina, more often than mulier, used in contrast to vir.

Exitus habent et introitus seems to scan better -- just my opinon.

For "One man in his time", I'd suggest "Homo in tempore".

I'd say partes plures agit for "plays many parts".

Again, these are just my suggestions.
Penguin90
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Apr, 2012 09:07 pm
@George,
@George

Thank you... :-) I kinda figured I messed it up a bit...
George
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 May, 2012 04:02 pm
@Penguin90,
No, you did well.
. . and you're welcome.
Benhomer91
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Jun, 2012 02:14 pm
@George,
@george

I've been looking for a translation everywhere for my tattoo but cannot find one that is the same on 3 different websites. How would you translate this?
"For those who are with us and for those who are not"

It's for my memorial tattoo and want it to be 100%rught.

Thanks!
George
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Jun, 2012 03:34 pm
@Benhomer91,
Since it has to be 100% accurate, I would advise getting a professional.
AlishaH
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Jun, 2012 08:41 am
@George,
Hello Wink

I was wondering if I could possibly have a few short things translated?

You are the one I choose -

My heart belongs to you -

We were meant to be -

My sun, and stars -

I am trying to decide on what to get engraved into a ring Wink

Thank you so much!

George
 
  2  
Reply Mon 11 Jun, 2012 10:00 am
@AlishaH,
You are the one I choose -
Tu es quem elegi -

My heart belongs to you -
Cor meum tibi est -

We were meant to be -
Nos esse fati sumus -

My sun, and stars -
Sol meus et stellae meae -

Please read this.
0 Replies
 
rdwarior
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jun, 2012 01:22 pm
Hoping you can translate this for me...

“You don’t know what you’re alive for, until you know what you’d die for.”

(Spoken by a male if it matters or helps)
Thanks in advance.
George
 
  2  
Reply Thu 14 Jun, 2012 05:02 pm
@rdwarior,
Pro quo vivis non scis dum pro quo moriaris scis.
0 Replies
 
Shazatron
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Jun, 2012 05:11 pm
@George,
hi @George are you PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE able to please translate this for me: its very very very important that it is correct. ive had sooooo many problems trying to get this translated.

"change what cannot be endured, endure what cannot be changed"

ive had heaps of answers but they all seem wrong, the following is what i have been given as "correct":

1. emenda quod pati non potes, pate quod emendare non potes
2. muta quod non tolerandum, tolera quod non mutandum

help would be much appreciated, and if you have time, explaining how your answer is correct would ease my mind Smile
George
 
  3  
Reply Wed 27 Jun, 2012 07:57 am
@Shazatron,
Shazatron wrote:

hi @George are you PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE able to please translate this
for me: its very very very important that it is correct. ive had sooooo
many problems trying to get this translated.

"change what cannot be endured, endure what cannot be changed"

ive had heaps of answers but they all seem wrong, the following is what
i have been given as "correct":

1. emenda quod pati non potes, pate quod emendare non potes
2. muta quod non tolerandum, tolera quod non mutandum

help would be much appreciated, and if you have time, explaining how
your answer is correct would ease my mind Smile


First let's look at the translations you have.

emenda quod pati non potes, pate quod emendare non potes
emenda --> Imperative of the verb emendo. This word means change
in the sense of fix, correct, emand.
quod --> what or which
pati --> infinitive of the verb patior. It means to endure, suffer or bear
with.
non --> not
potes --> "you are able" from the verb possum
The rest of the sentence uses the same words switching the places of
emendo and patior.
So lierally this would be:
Correct what you cannot endure; endure what you cannot correct.

Now for the second. In this translation the author does not use potes
"you are able" plus the infinive as the first author did. Instead,
this author uses something called the gerundive. The gerundive is
used to express necessity, obligation or propriety.
muta quod non tolerandum, tolera quod non mutandum
muta --> Imperative of the verb muto. This means change, but
without the implication of fixing or correcting.
tolerandum --> Gerundive of the verb tolero. This word means bear,
support, sustain or endure.
So literally this would be:
Change what should not be endured; endure what should not be changed.

So, from what I've written , does one of these fit your requirements?
0 Replies
 
patrickR
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Jul, 2012 09:17 pm
Could you translate these please:

Mine forever
(mea aeternum?)

My beloved.
Yours forever.
I will love you forever.
George
 
  2  
Reply Tue 17 Jul, 2012 08:42 am
@patrickR,
I'm assuming you are addressing a female with these.

Mine forever
(mea aeternum?)
Mea in aeternum

My beloved.
Dilecta mea (or Carissima mea)

Yours forever (assuming this refers to a male)
Tuus in aeternum

I will love you forever.
Te in aeternum amabo.
patrickR
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Jul, 2012 11:40 am
@George

Thank you very much.

Yes, they were addressing a female. The yours forever was a male speaking of himself to a female.
0 Replies
 
HelenW
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Jul, 2012 03:26 pm
@George,
Hi
Just curious as to what the mine forever would be when addressing a man as opposed to a woman?
Thanks
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Jul, 2012 04:32 pm
@HelenW,
HelenW wrote:

Hi
Just curious as to what the mine forever would be when addressing a man as opposed to a woman?
Thanks


tua instead of tuus for "your's".
HelenW
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Jul, 2012 04:44 am
@Lustig Andrei,
Thanks Smile so do i assume that 'mine forever' when referring to a man would be meus in aeternum (rather than mea in the feminine)?
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Jul, 2012 10:50 am
@HelenW,
That's my understanding, too.
 

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