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Stonehenge - new theories and facts

 
 
Reply Mon 27 Nov, 2006 01:10 am
Quote:
Early sketch of Stonehenge found

Maev Kennedy
Monday November 27, 2006
The Guardian

They got the date wrong by some 3,000 years, but the oldest detailed drawing of Stonehenge, apparently based on first hand observation, has turned up in a 15th century manuscript.
The little sketch is a bird's eye view of the stones, and shows the great trilithons, the biggest stones in the monument, each made of two pillars capped with a third stone lintel, which stand in a horseshoe in the centre of the circle. Only three are now standing, but the drawing, found in Douai, northern France, suggests that in the 15th century four of the original five survived.

In the Scala Mundi, the Chronicle of the World, Merlin is given credit for building Stonehenge between 480 and 486, when the Latin text says he "not by force, but by art, brought and erected the giant's ring from Ireland". Modern science suggests that the stones went up from 2,500 BC, with the bluestone outer circle somehow transported from west Wales, and the double decker bus-size sarsen stones dragged 30 miles across Salisbury plain.
The drawing, recently identified by the art historian Christian Heck, has never been exhibited, but according to the Art Newspaper it will be seen next year in an exhibition at the Royal Academy in London, marking the 300th anniversary of the Society of Antiquaries.

There are two earlier images of Stonehenge, one in the British Library and one in the Parker Library in Cambridge, but the Douai drawing is unique in attempting to show how the monument was built.

It correctly shows tenon joints piercing the lintel, a timber construction technique, although in fact the real Stonehenge tenons only go partly into the top stone.

Stonehenge is rare among prehistoric landscapes, because its sheer bulk meant it was never lost. An Anglo Saxon poet wondered about the origin of the stones and inspired some of the earliest photographs.

In the Scala Mundi, the Chronicle of the World, Merlin is given credit for building Stonehenge between 480 and 486, when the Latin text says he "not by force, but by art, brought and erected the giant's ring from Ireland". Modern science suggests that the stones went up from 2,500 BC, with the bluestone outer circle somehow transported from west Wales, and the double decker bus-size sarsen stones dragged 30 miles across Salisbury plain.
The drawing, recently identified by the art historian Christian Heck, has never been exhibited, but according to the Art Newspaper it will be seen next year in an exhibition at the Royal Academy in London, marking the 300th anniversary of the Society of Antiquaries.

There are two earlier images of Stonehenge, one in the British Library and one in the Parker Library in Cambridge, but the Douai drawing is unique in attempting to show how the monument was built.

It correctly shows tenon joints piercing the lintel, a timber construction technique, although in fact the real Stonehenge tenons only go partly into the top stone.

Stonehenge is rare among prehistoric landscapes, because its sheer bulk meant it was never lost. An Anglo Saxon poet wondered about the origin of the stones and inspired some of the earliest photographs.
Source

http://i11.tinypic.com/3ycc74y.jpg
source: The Guardian, 27.11.2006, page 15
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Nov, 2006 01:11 am
Quote:
Stonehenge was a site for sore eyes in 2300BC

Source

http://i12.tinypic.com/4cl2mag.jpg
Source: The Daily Telegraph, 27.11.2006, page 9
Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Nov, 2006 01:50 am
Fascinating stuff, Walter.

I always love the first sight of Stonehenge, when I'm driving on the A road that goes right past it. As you come over the brow of a hill, there it is, about two miles in the distance.

However, the last time I was nearing Stonehenge, a bloody great Army Tank was waiting in a slip road for a gap in the traffic, so that it could cross the road and head towards the military zone on Salisbury plain.

I was about a hundred yards away, going at about 60 mph, when the tank driver's foot must have slipped off the clutch, causing the tank to lurch out, right across my lane.
Luckily there was nothing coming the other way, so I managed to veer round him.

I was going to stick my finger up at him for causing such a panic, but then I had visions of an armour piercing shell being lobbed at me in reply, so I just put my head down and carried on.
Bohne
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Nov, 2006 03:31 am
[quote="Lord Ellpus"]I always love the first sight of Stonehenge, when I'm driving on the A road that goes right past it. As you come over the brow of a hill, there it is, about two miles in the distance.[/quote]

First time I went to visit, there was one fence keeping you from touching the boulders.
Last time I went (which was several years ago), I think there where three.

You probably get a better view from the road!
Discovered Avesbury two years ago!
Have you ever been there?
Not quite as impressive in size, but my new favourite!
0 Replies
 
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Nov, 2006 06:04 am
THis is one of the places I will go in my life time.

Maybe sooner then later..
0 Replies
 
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Nov, 2006 06:14 am
Enjoyed Avesbury a lot more than Stonehenge. It was a much more relaxing and organic experience.






Some hippies in Santa Cruz built a little hange -- these stones couldn't have been more then a couple hundred kilos a piece. Still and all, given the circumstances, probably as impressive and as unlikely as the original unstoned henge.
0 Replies
 
Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Nov, 2006 07:41 am
I totally agree with you, PD.

When I was a kid, I could walk in and out of the stones at Stonehenge, although we weren't allowed to touch them unless supervised.

Nowadays, with the massive explosion in global tourism, you're kept well away, and basically stand in a rain sodden field, looking at a bunch of distant boulders.
They've built a super duper (yeh, right) "tourist centre" there, but THAT'S not what people want to go and visit.

Much better off going to Avebury, or Silbury Hill, which is not far from Avebury.
Plus the fact, Avebury is near a town called Marlborough, which is quite lovely.

Or....in Shewolf's case, even Cerne Abbas. Much more up her street, methinks.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerne_Abbas_Giant
0 Replies
 
Tai Chi
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Nov, 2006 07:58 am
Saw Stonehenge about 17 years ago on our one-and-only trip to England. I won't say it was a disappointment but I was much more affected by a ring of standing stones (the seven sisters, I think?) discovered later on a quiet road. I suppose there's a fence around them, now...<<sigh>>

Cerne Abbas was impressive. And by the number of bus tours we met up with a lot of people think so Laughing
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Nov, 2006 12:44 pm
I've been first to Stonehenge more than 40 years ago - it wasn' really so eciting for someone, who lives close to the Externsteine. :wink:

(It's a lot different, I know - but the mystic about and around it is very similar.)
0 Replies
 
Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Nov, 2006 12:45 pm
Walter, I was there more than 40 years ago as well!

You weren't that little spotty German boy who stole my ice cream, were you?
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Nov, 2006 12:47 pm
A 99 Flake by any chance? Embarrassed
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Nov, 2006 12:50 pm
No, it can't have been me: I was neither little nor spotty nor a boy but a nearly adult and grown-up German youth of 14!
0 Replies
 
Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Nov, 2006 12:51 pm
It was you!!

That's 2d you owe me!
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  0  
Reply Mon 27 Nov, 2006 12:55 pm
Quote:
Stonehenge was the Lourdes of its day, to which diseased and injured ancient Britons flocked seeking cures for their ailments


now the huge monolithic fossilised NHS does the same. But more expensive.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Nov, 2006 01:37 pm
Lord Ellpus wrote:
It was you!!

That's 2d you owe me!


You got the world cup shortly afterwards - besides, I would have never stolen such a small cone as you got for 2d!
0 Replies
 
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Nov, 2006 02:53 pm
So, to visit the stones NOW, you can not actually get to them?

Well.. aint that dandy.. Confused
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  0  
Reply Mon 27 Nov, 2006 05:03 pm
shewolfnm wrote:
So, to visit the stones NOW, you can not actually get to them?

Well.. aint that dandy.. Confused
you can see them best from the A303, its not worth actually stopping.

I think Stonehenge is just about the most boring load of knocked down stones in Britain. Until you remember the whole area was one great maze of burial grounds, monoliths stone circle etc. Fascinating if you're into stones.
0 Replies
 
Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Nov, 2006 05:41 pm
Walter Hinteler wrote:


You got the world cup shortly afterwards - ............




What....THIS ONE??..........


http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b358/lordellpus/WORLDCUPANDME2.jpg
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Nov, 2006 11:05 pm
You know for sure what a meant ... you ... you .... cheaters!
0 Replies
 
Bohne
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Nov, 2006 02:45 am
[quote="Lord Ellpus"]Much better off going to Avebury, or Silbury Hill, which is not far from Avebury.
Plus the fact, Avebury is near a town called Marlborough, which is quite lovely.[/quote]

PLUS, there is a really cool Pub in Avebury, in the center of the circle!
England's most haunted Pub if I remember correctly!
0 Replies
 
 

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