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Stonehenge - new theories and facts

 
 
bungie
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Jan, 2007 11:14 pm
Geez, what is it with people in authority and fences ? The stones are as old as the earth itself, so why can't people walk among them and touch them if they want ? I don't think they will wear them out or steal them .... We seem to suffer from the same mentality here, if people like something, fence it off and keep them out ...... it really bugs me ... there, now I've had my gripe, I feel better now. lol
0 Replies
 
anton bonnier
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Jan, 2007 11:47 pm
I was there 60 years ago... my old man had always wanted to see it since he was a little boy, I wasn't impressed... but left my mark on it... I peed on it.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Jan, 2007 12:36 am
My first visit to Stonehenge was very long ago when we were able to walk between the stones. The last several times I've visited, the area was "blocked" by rope or chain. One time, they even had a "show" of Romans parading around.
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  0  
Reply Mon 29 Jan, 2007 07:15 am
cicerone imposter wrote:
My first visit to Stonehenge was very long ago ... they even had a "show" of Romans parading around.
Take it easy CI you're into your third millennium now you know.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Jan, 2007 01:03 pm
Steve, I know!
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Jan, 2007 03:56 pm
Stonehenge builders' houses found

http://www.spiegel.de/img/0,1020,789990,00.jpg

http://www.spiegel.de/img/0,1020,790006,00.jpg
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Jan, 2007 06:58 pm
Fascinating stuff, Walter, thank you.

I was going to post about the new discovery of what is believed to be the village of the workers, but you've beat me to it.

Here is a link on the story from the New York Times.
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Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Jan, 2007 07:01 pm
Sounds like Stonehenge was more like a Bar-B-Q joint, a Neolithic Hooters.
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edgewaters
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Feb, 2007 11:59 pm
bungie wrote:
Geez, what is it with people in authority and fences ?


Goes back to a little thing called the Enclosures.
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plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Sun 11 Feb, 2007 03:07 pm
There is some speculation that it was a Neolithic cattle market as well as an observatory.
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 May, 2008 06:22 pm
Here's a news clip, but I'm not sure how much is current news now that I see this thread....

http://www.boston.com/news/science/articles/2008/05/29/study_for_centuries_stonehenge_was_a_burial_site/
0 Replies
 
bungie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Jun, 2008 12:17 am
Maybe the buildings were not worker's huts, perhaps they were gatekeepers to keep people out, or charge a fee for entry to walk among the stones.
Wouldn't surprise me.
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Jun, 2008 12:57 am
I missed this thread first time thru

Have just been to Orkney, artefacts there similar vintage & older.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Jun, 2008 01:25 am
McTag wrote:
Have just been to Orkney, artefacts there similar vintage & older.


http://img.timeinc.net/time/europe/wonder/images/500_stones.jpg

The Standing Stones o' Stenness
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Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Mon 22 Sep, 2008 01:10 am
The first accurate carbon dating of Stonehenge reveals the monument was built in 2300 BC, 300 years later than thought.

From the BBC: Dig pinpoints Stonehenge origins
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Sep, 2008 05:20 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Quote:
Some archaeologists believe the Archer is the key to understanding why Stonehenge was built.


This was news to me!
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Sep, 2008 05:30 am
@Steve 41oo,
Yeah, you get a lot out of someone when he's in prison Wink
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Mon 22 Sep, 2008 11:50 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
The new archaeological findings at Stonehege suggest it once may have been southern England's A&E unit, according to a report in today's Guardian

http://i37.tinypic.com/ndv48g.jpg
http://i37.tinypic.com/whdsmp.jpg
(Source. Guardian, 23.09.08, page 18)
Quote:
Archaeologists had believed that by the time the Romans arrived in Britain, Stonehenge was just a towering enigma, its ritual importance entirely forgotten.

The latest finds imply a much more complex story: they include a Roman coin among stone fragments, suggesting the Romans also believed in and sought out the healing magic. The later charcoal deposits suggest to Darvill and Wainwright annual gatherings, perhaps for feasting and ceremony at the winter solstice, continuing as late as the 17th century.

The modern-day druids and pagans who assemble bearing green boughs for the winter and summer solstices may not be so far off the mark after all.

The last excavation at Stonehenge was in 1964. Although in April Darvill and Wainwright only won permission from English Heritage for a trench the size of a large hearthrug - "a little piece of keyhole surgery" as Darvill described it - it was the first excavation at which the whole armoury of modern scientific archaeology could be fired. "This is very much work in progress," Wainwright said yesterday. "There are more surprises to come, I'm sure of that."

Next season they will be back in Preseli, looking for more evidence of ritual practice at the home of the bluestones.

"I'm sure we'll find the Welsh architect of Stonehenge yet," Wainwright said.

The excavation was funded by BBC Timewatch and Smithsonian Networks and a documentary on the findings will be screened on BBC2 at 8pm on Saturday.

And re the Archer, the above quoted report says:
Quote:
The Archer, whose grave was found in 2002 just three miles from Stonehenge, came like the much younger man buried near him - who may have been a son or nephew - from modern Switzerland. The skeleton suggests he spent years in agony from a shattered kneecap, and may eventually have died poisoned by an abscess which rotted a hole through his jaw.





Steve 41oo
 
  0  
Reply Tue 23 Sep, 2008 09:15 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

And re the Archer, the above quoted report says:
Quote:
The Archer, whose grave was found in 2002 just three miles from Stonehenge, came like the much younger man buried near him - who may have been a son or nephew - from modern Switzerland. The skeleton suggests he spent years in agony from a shattered kneecap, and may eventually have died poisoned by an abscess which rotted a hole through his jaw.

thanks, feel a lot better for that
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Wed 24 Sep, 2008 12:27 am
http://i38.tinypic.com/aynm10.jpg
(Source: Independent, 24.09.08, page 30)

The big question: What do new discoveries tell us about the meaning of Stonehenge?
Quote:
[...]
Will we ever be able to know the truth about Stonehenge?


Yes...
* Dating technology gets better all the time, giving more accurate estimates of when something happened.
* Tests, such as teeth analysis, are being refined and allow scientists to draw better conclusions.
* Much of the site has not been properly excavated, so there are many things still to be discovered.

No...
* The site took so long to construct that it will be virtually impossible to decipher its true purpose.
* Terrible damage over the past few centuries has made the site only a poor version of what it was once.
* Stonehenge will always be a mystery because it represents what was in the minds of people long dead.


 

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