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Stonehenge - new theories and facts

 
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Feb, 2018 01:25 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
I remember being a little boy in the mid/late 60s and getting 'six pennath' of chips, 6d ( two and a half pence) and that came in a greaseproof paper bag with one layer of plain white paper and the rest wrapped up in newspaper, so the food didn't come into contact with newspaper back then. That's my earliest chip related memory.

Maybe it was served directly onto newspaper in more austere times, but I don't remember it.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Feb, 2018 01:52 pm
@izzythepush,
I had my first fish'n chips in Poole in 1963.

https://i.imgur.com/5aKqdq3.jpg
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Feb, 2018 01:57 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
I hadn't progressed onto solids back then.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Feb, 2018 03:29 pm
I don't know if folks will be able to access this article--they put up a subscription notice. According to this National Geographic article, the first stone henge (and earlier wood henges) were in what is now Scotland.

OK, I've found a link which you can use--although you'll have to tell them to piss off when their subscription notice appears (just X it out in the upper right hand corner): Stonehenge Precursor Found? Island Complex Predates Famous Site

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2014/08/neolithic-orkney/img/01-stennes-stone-circle-670.jpg
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Feb, 2018 03:39 pm
This is from Wilderness Scotland: https://www.wildernessscotland.com/blog/scotlands-stonehenge-standing-stones-callanish/
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Feb, 2018 04:48 pm
Avebury ring isn't far from Stonehenge and in its own way is just as impressive.

https://www.eyeflare.com/images/illustrations/1052-avebury-stone-circle.jpg


Quote:
The Great Stones Way is one of those ideas so obvious it seems amazing that no one has thought of it before: a 38-mile walking trail to link England's two greatest prehistoric sites, Avebury and Stonehenge, crossing a landscape covered with Neolithic monuments.

But like any project involving the English countryside, it's not as straightforward as it might seem. The steering group has had to secure permission from landowners and the MoD, who use much of Salisbury Plain for training. They hope to have the whole trail open within a year, but for now are trialling a 14-mile southern stretch, having secured agreement from the MoD and parish councils. The "Plain & Avon" section leads from the iron age hill fort of Casterley Camp on Salisbury Plain down the Avon valley to Stonehenge. Walkers are being encouraged to test the route, and detailed directions can be found on the Friends of the Ridgeway website.

It's an area all but the boldest have avoided: negotiating the MoD areas needed careful planning. Few walkers come here and not a single garage or shop along the Avon valley sells local maps. The Great Stones Way should change that.

What makes the prospect of the Great Stones Way so exciting is the sense that for more than a millennium, between around 3000 and 2000BC, the area it crosses was the scene of frenzied Neolithic building activity, with henges, burial barrows and processional avenues criss-crossing the route.



More at link.

https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2011/may/14/stonehenge-avebury-great-stones-way-walking-trail
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Feb, 2018 04:56 pm
@izzythepush,
Salisbury plain is a bit daunting. This unfamiliar roadsign is very familiar indeed.

http://l7.alamy.com/zooms/8dca3dc18c1e414f94181f07906a391c/tanks-crossing-and-sudden-gunfire-road-warning-sign-at-army-firing-be6y7a.jpg

The only other place I've seen it is by the tank museum in Dorset.
0 Replies
 
Josip312
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Apr, 2018 06:51 am
Could the prehistoric Stonehenge megaliths once have been the support for a wooden, two-storey roundhouse, a venue for feasting, speakers and musicians? That’s the theory of an English landscape architect who designed a small model of what she has in mind and is looking for money to build a 1:10 scale model of the structure.

Sarah Ewbank says the fact she is not an archaeologist has freed her from preconceived notions and allowed her to approach the matter in a fresh way.http://www.ancient-origins.net/sites/default/files/monument.jpg?itok=XJGxQAiF
Here is the link to know more about "new theory that Stonehenge was a two-storey, wooden feasting and performance hall:
Edit [Moderator]: Link removed
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Apr, 2018 01:39 pm
@Lord Ellpus,
If that event had occurred, it would have been international news. I have had the pleasure to have visited Stonehenge several times. I remember a time when we were able to walk amongst the stones.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Apr, 2018 02:25 pm
@cicerone imposter,
No it wouldn't. There are tanks all over Salisbury plain. It would have to be a very dull news day for one to lurch out in front of a car.

I've had them cross the road in front of me, it's that sort of place.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Jun, 2019 09:09 am
@izzythepush,
Scotland's crannogs are older than Stonehenge:
Archaeologists have discovered that some Scottish crannogs are thousands of years older than previously thought. It was thought they were first built in the Iron Age, a period that began around 800 BC.
But four Western Isles sites have been radiocarbon dated to about 3640-3360 BC in the Neolithic period - before the erection of Stonehenge's stone circle.

Neolithic crannogs: rethinking settlement, monumentality and deposition in the Outer Hebrides and beyond (Antiquity, Volume 93, Issue 369 June 2019 , pp. 664-684)
Quote:
Abstract
Artificial islets, or crannogs, are widespread across Scotland. Traditionally considered to date to no earlier than the Iron Age, recent research has now identified several Outer Hebridean Neolithic crannogs. Survey and excavation of these sites has demonstrated—for the first time—that crannogs were a widespread feature of the Neolithic and that they may have been special locations, as evidenced by the deposition of material culture into the surrounding water. These findings challenge current conceptualisations of Neolithic settlement, monumentality and depositional practice, while suggesting that other ‘undated’ crannogs across Scotland and Ireland could potentially have Neolithic origins.


cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Thu 13 Jun, 2019 10:38 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Photos of Scottish crannogs. https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search;_ylt=AwrUi6bmewJdv2wAkgAPxQt.;_ylu=X3oDMTByNWU4cGh1BGNvbG8DZ3ExBHBvcwMxBHZ0aWQDBHNlYwNzYw--?p=scottish+crannogs+scotland&fr=yhs-pty-pty_converter&hspart=pty&hsimp=yhs-pty_converter
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Jun, 2019 11:11 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Sunrise at Stonehenge will now be visible around the world
Quote:
Summer solstice is launch date for live feed from camera close to the stones

For thousands of years people have made the pilgrimage to Stonehenge to gaze in wonder at the interplay with the monument of the sun, moon and stars, but from Friday a virtual version of the looming sky above the circle will be available to people from around the world.

A live feed from a camera set up close to the stones is being set up – appropriately enough on the summer solstice – to allow people to tune in to the monument whenever they want.

After dark, the live feed is replaced by a computer-generated image of the night sky as it would be at the moment a viewer clicks on the link to the website.

English Heritage hopes that the feed will allow those who cannot make the trip in person to experience sunrise, sunset and the ever-changing night sky, and even make them feel closer to the ancient people who created the stone circle.

The Stonehenge Skyscape project may also be used as a method of worship for those who believe that the stone circle and landscape is a deeply spiritual place.

Susan Greaney, a senior historian at English Heritage, said: “Stonehenge was built to align with the sun, and to neolithic people the skies were arguably as important as the surrounding landscape.

“At solstice we remember the changing daylight hours, but the changing seasons, cycles of the moon and movements of the sun are likely to have underpinned many practical and spiritual aspects of neolithic life.

“Stonehenge’s connection with the skies is a crucial part of understanding the monument today and we are really excited to share this view online with people all over the world. If someone can’t travel to Stonehenge, they will still be able to witness what is happening there from wherever they are. People on the other side of the world will be able to see sunrise at Stonehenge.”

As part of the project, English Heritage has joined forces with the space scientist and science educator Dr Maggie Aderin-Pocock, who will host a star and moon-gazing event next month.

She said: “Imagine our neolithic ancestors sitting around a fire looking up at the heavens and telling stories inspired by the movement of the planets, the patterns of the stars and of course the sun and the moon.

“Stonehenge Skyscape offers a mesmerising insight into our ancestors’ lives and hopefully, beyond visiting the website, it will inspire people all over the world to go outside and look up.”

Aderin-Pocock said the project could help people who were were losing their connection with the night sky because of light pollution. “People who are aware of Stonehenge but not able to make the trip can see the sunrise, the sunset and the stars there. It gives global access to something really amazing. It could also help people who are stressed. There’s something very peaceful about gazing at the sky.”

Stonehenge Skyscape is a composite representation of the sky above the stones accurate to within a window of approximately five minutes. After dark it switches from a photographic depiction to a computer-generated one, which accurately displays the live location of the stars and visible planets.

Neptune, Uranus and Pluto are consciously not included because, being invisible to the naked eye, they were undiscovered until the 18th century or later.
0 Replies
 
 

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