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Message for McTag-need help with scots language

 
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Dec, 2005 01:07 am
JGoldman10 wrote:
A nizzart is a sharp-faced perosn. Does that mean someone wtih a pointy nose or someone that's alert?


"Sharp-faced" has the connotation of a pinched, mean-looking face; thin, unpleasant.
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JGoldman10
 
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Reply Mon 19 Dec, 2005 04:42 pm
Hi. Are you sure you haven't heard Stag, Ramp and Hoity-Toity and Romp used as Scottish slang terms?

What is Scottish slang for a large strapping woman?
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JGoldman10
 
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Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2005 06:54 pm
I was told I could use the terms "flam" and "strammel".
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JGoldman10
 
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Reply Thu 29 Dec, 2005 05:19 pm
Hello Mctag. I hope you have a nice holiday.

An 'Arry, in the 19c-Early 20c, was the popular embodiment of the vulgar, rollicking, yet on the whole good natured rough of the great (British) metropolis. What is his Old Scottish slang counterpart?
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McTag
 
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Reply Fri 30 Dec, 2005 02:17 am
JGoldman10 wrote:
Hello Mctag. I hope you have a nice holiday.

An 'Arry, in the 19c-Early 20c, was the popular embodiment of the vulgar, rollicking, yet on the whole good natured rough of the great (British) metropolis. What is his Old Scottish slang counterpart?


I looked in Burns for an appropriate answer to this one

"And at his elbow, Souter Johnie,
His ancient, trusty, drougthy crony:
Tam lo'ed him like a very brither;
They had been fou for weeks thegither"

but was disappointed. It's kind of difficult to pin down- "chiel", "loon" (from loons and quinies- East Coast) to the modern "bear", none seems particularly satisfactory.
Chiel is the best I can come up with right now, and is an affectionate term, slightly patronising, but has no connotation of "rough".
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JGoldman10
 
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Reply Sat 31 Dec, 2005 02:12 pm
Thank you for your help, Mctag, and happy new year!
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JGoldman10
 
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Reply Sat 31 Dec, 2005 02:51 pm
Besides The Oxford English Dictionary second edition
Macleod's Scots Thesaurus
Slang and Its Analogues

What are the best dictionaries and thesaurues on Scots, and old and current Scottish slang?
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McTag
 
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Reply Sat 31 Dec, 2005 03:13 pm
I wish I knew why you want to know this stuff, my friend. It fair diz ma heid in, so it diz.

I never consult such sources myself, having enough trouble with English, but I am sure Glasgow University (try also Edinburgh, Aberdeen and St Andrews) publish studies and resource material on Scottish dialects from a historical perspective.
Indeed, there has been an attempt (I think by nationalist-inspired sources) to promote Lallans as a separate language, but I'm not so sure about the validity of that.
On current slang- I saw a website today, and I'll try to find it again now:
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McTag
 
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Reply Sat 31 Dec, 2005 03:29 pm
I can't find it, but I found this:

http://www.clyde-valley.com/glasgow/dialect.htm

not terribly serious.
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McTag
 
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Reply Sun 1 Jan, 2006 12:35 am
A Guid New Year to ane an' a'

A guid new year to ane an' a'
An' mony may ye see,
An' during a' the years to come,
O happy may ye be.
An' may ye ne'er hae cause to mourn,
To sigh or shed a tear;
To ane an' a' baith great an' sma'
A hearty guid New year.

Chorus
A guid New Year to ane an' a'
An' mony may ye see,
An' during a' the years to come,
O happy may ye be.


-A traditional song sung on Ist January
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JGoldman10
 
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Reply Tue 3 Jan, 2006 05:34 pm
Hello, Mctag. Have you ever heard the term

howdy

used for "costermonger" or "good-natured rough not neccessarily criminal"?

Are the terms Jock, Jockey and Jockette considered derogatory?
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McTag
 
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Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2006 02:57 am
"howdy"- no, I haven't. I'll ask others.

"Jock" is not considered derogatory. It can be both neutral, and slightly affectionate.

Jockey and Jockette would be only used in a humorous way, I think, in the intended sense of being patronising.
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Lord Ellpus
 
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Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2006 03:02 am
I have a Scots mate who calls an idiot a "ballhead", (pronounced "bore heed")....it always makes me laugh.
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McTag
 
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Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2006 03:08 am
Lord Ellpus wrote:
I have a Scots mate who calls an idiot a "ballhead", (pronounced "bore heed")....it always makes me laugh.


Yes, ba' heid, to be precise.

In the first person, you will make him smile if you address him as "heid the ba' "- used e.g. to get someone's attention
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Lord Ellpus
 
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Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2006 03:15 am
Another friend of mine, from Northern Ireland, curses someone by calling them a "blurt" (?).

"Ah, ya blurt, ye"

I have no idea what this actually means, but it sounds suitably scathing when spoken in the correct accent.
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McTag
 
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Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2006 04:03 pm
Call your Scottish friend a glaikit gommeral, then step back.
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JGoldman10
 
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Reply Wed 11 Jan, 2006 05:19 pm
McTag, do you have any friends from Ireland, England and Wales who post here regularly?
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McTag
 
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Reply Wed 11 Jan, 2006 05:32 pm
"Friends" is a very emotive word.

There are a few shady characters like Ellpus, but we don't talk about him.

I don't think I've ever seen a Welsh, but they are very elusive creatures, always out singing or playing rugby.

The Irish are here already.
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lmur
 
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Reply Fri 13 Jan, 2006 06:41 am
Have been offline for a couple of days, McTag - I understand that you may have paid a visit to the Panadolian Valley? Hope you've recovered alright.

Mr Goldman - I may only be able to assist you with exact words or phrases from the Irish language. I have little or no knowledge of slang / etymo-whatever. Feel free to ask anyway and i'll see what I can do.
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McTag
 
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Reply Sun 15 Jan, 2006 12:16 pm
Here's a Scottish slant on early American history, seen today:

http://heritage.scotsman.com/topics.cfm?tid=261&id=346502005

(ed: that link's not accurate enough, I meant the article (use link) on the bottom of the page, right side.)

McT
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