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Message for McTag-need help with scots language

 
 
Reply Thu 6 Oct, 2005 01:22 pm
Hello, Mctag. I have a topic here called "scottish roughs" that I need help with, and I could use your input.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 7,232 • Replies: 150
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McTag
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Oct, 2005 01:24 pm
Ask, and it shall be given unto you. Seek, and ye shall find.
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JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Oct, 2005 02:07 pm
Thank you.
What are Scots dialect and slang words and synonyms for
roughs
tough guys
besides "keelie" and "ned"?
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JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Oct, 2005 03:36 pm
"Chav" and "chavvy" are two terms I found.
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JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Oct, 2005 04:48 pm
Also, what do you call someone in Scots dialect/slang that's strong both physically and emotoinally?
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McTag
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Oct, 2005 05:20 pm
These terms change with time.

"Keely" and "Ned" are both a little outmoded, I think.

I will consult, research, and report back.
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roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Oct, 2005 06:15 pm
Since you're here, McTag, what's the pronunciation of moggy. Is it a long O?
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McTag
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Oct, 2005 02:28 am
Moggy has a short "O", like foggy, but it's not a Scottish word.
Well you never said it was, of course.
I speak English too.
Smile
Someone has published this week (saw it on the TV) a book of new words being adopted into the language- third revision, I think.
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JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Oct, 2005 02:47 pm
What about a "braw"?
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roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Oct, 2005 06:07 pm
Thank you, both for the answer and the correction.
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McTag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Oct, 2005 09:45 am
Sorry, I've been away and offline.

But not idle; still on the case. I consulted my brother.

"Ned" is still current, "keely" is not. (= thug, low-life, corner-boy, petty criminal) Apparently a "senga" is a female ned.
See also "nyaff" (=cheeky urchin, scrawny runt, not necessarily criminal)

Words for courageous etc are not prominent in the dialect, and so ordinary English words would be used when that meaning is required.

"Braw" is simply an adjective meaning handsome, good-looking, fine.
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Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Oct, 2005 09:57 am
While I bow to McTag's serious authority here, I felt sure the Scottish slang for courage was "bottle"... Very Happy

Maybe that's just for north and west of Oban?
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JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Oct, 2005 03:30 pm
What about the word "battler"?
What about a word for an emotionally and physically strong person?
Are Hardcase and hard nut terms they use in Scotland.
What about "deliquent boy/youth"?
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goodfielder
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Oct, 2005 09:03 pm
Piffka wrote:
While I bow to McTag's serious authority here, I felt sure the Scottish slang for courage was "bottle"... Very Happy

Maybe that's just for north and west of Oban?


English, specifically London, slang. Its use is out of rhyming slang.

That is - "he lost his bottle". Meaning "he lost his bottle and glass".. Meaning he lost his "bottle and glass" (or "arse"), that is, he lost his "arse", he lost his courage. So to lose one's bottle means to display cowardice.

Or - I displayed plenty of bottle to mention that here.
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Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Oct, 2005 09:30 pm
And all along I thought the Scots were like the rest of us. A bottle of spirits provided liquid courage for certain occasions. If ye get my meanin'.
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goodfielder
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Oct, 2005 10:01 pm
Famous song:

Quote:
)
I belong to Glasgow, dear old Glasgow town
But something's the matter with Glasgow
For it's going round and round
I'm only a common old working chap as anyone here can see
But when I get a couple of drinks on a Saturday
Glasgow belongs to me

I've been wi' a few o' ma cronies, one or two pals o' ma ain
We went in a hotel, where we did very well
Then we came out once again
Then we went into another, that is the reason I'm fu'
We had six deoch an' doruises, then sang a chorus
Just listen, I'll sing it to you

There's nothing in being teetotal and saving a shilling or two
If your money you spend you've nothing to lend
Well, that's all the better for you
There's nae harm in taking a drappie, it ends all your trouble and strife
It gives you the feeling that when you get home
You don't care a hang for the wife


Apparently written by a Scottish gentleman named Will Fyffe.
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Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Oct, 2005 10:11 pm
I dunno, Goodfielder. I'm with Ceili on this. I understand the Cockney chants but I think of this as liquid courage and the use of "bottle" refers to whisky, as in "Piffka had the bottle to tell off her boss."


Where's McTag when ye need 'im?
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goodfielder
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Oct, 2005 10:22 pm
Piffka wrote:
I dunno, Goodfielder. I'm with Ceili on this. I understand the Cockney chants but I think of this as liquid courage and the use of "bottle" refers to whisky, as in "Piffka had the bottle to tell off her boss."


Where's McTag when ye need 'im?


No worries - but I think the Brits refer to "Dutch courage" when they talk about confidence from a bottle so I'l be interested to see how it pans out.

When I was a teenager I played soccer on a junior team and my best friend at the time was a Glaswegian (mad Partick Thistle supporter) and when he said "bottle" to someone on the field he usually meant that he was going to use one on them later Very Happy
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McTag
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Oct, 2005 10:42 am
goodfielder wrote:
Piffka wrote:
While I bow to McTag's serious authority here, I felt sure the Scottish slang for courage was "bottle"... Very Happy

Maybe that's just for north and west of Oban?


English, specifically London, slang. Its use is out of rhyming slang.

That is - "he lost his bottle". Meaning "he lost his bottle and glass".. Meaning he lost his "bottle and glass" (or "arse"), that is, he lost his "arse", he lost his courage. So to lose one's bottle means to display cowardice.

Or - I displayed plenty of bottle to mention that here.


"Bottle" is pan-British slang, true.

But I got another opinion about the actual meaning of the rhyming slang, at the weekend (from my brother in London)

But I can't remember it now and he's not answering the phone.
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Oct, 2005 10:44 am
Piffka wrote:
I dunno, Goodfielder. I'm with Ceili on this. I understand the Cockney chants but I think of this as liquid courage and the use of "bottle" refers to whisky, as in "Piffka had the bottle to tell off her boss."


Where's McTag when ye need 'im?


I was down in Devon, "dahn saff".
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