0
   

Message for McTag-need help with scots language

 
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 23 Nov, 2005 12:29 am
If you are asking McTag directly: he's until mid-December in India.
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Nov, 2005 01:47 am
JGoldman10 wrote:
Are you sure I can't use the term "wee tam"?
Are there and dictionaries or glossaries of Scottish terms/slang assoicated with the two comic strips "Oor Wullie" and "The Broons"?


From a cyber-caff in downtown Bangalore....

"Wee Tam" refers to a person (=little Tom)

A wee tim, however, is a small chap of the Catholic religion/faith, and the term is used in a derogatory sense only.

Thompson Newspapers, the publishers, might help you with questions about Oor Wullie or The Broons, but I will help if I can. Ask away.
I don't personally know of any glossary about those.
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Nov, 2005 03:10 pm
Do you know any Scots synonyms for "wicht" or "Stodge"?
A tomboy or hoyden is a giddy girl, so can I use the terms "jad, jillet, jinker and clip"?

What is Scottish slang for tough kid, or brat or urchin, besides ned?
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2005 12:17 pm
"smatchet' is another term for 'pert girl".
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Nov, 2005 08:57 am
These terms are very esoteric. And, some are not known to me, and may be outmoded or archaic.

A tough kid could be a "wee nyaff", but that's more of an annoying litte brat.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Nov, 2005 09:36 am
According to the Dictionary of the Scotch Language smatchet isn't focused on girls but generally "a small insignificant person or animal, freq. applied to a pert or mischievous child, a little rogue ".
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 Dec, 2005 05:51 pm
THis question is for everyone:

Is hard neck and fishgig terms used in Scotland?
Is strammel used in Scotland?

Is "hard lass" actually a slang term?
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Dec, 2005 04:16 pm
Hello Mctag. Are you back yet?
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Dec, 2005 04:19 pm
I was told that Strammel/Stammel, which is a large strapping wench, is a term used in Scotland. Have you heard this term before?

HAve you heard the terms hogbeast and horn beast used before?
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Dec, 2005 10:57 pm
JGoldman10 wrote:
I was told that Strammel/Stammel, which is a large strapping wench, is a term used in Scotland. Have you heard this term before?

HAve you heard the terms hogbeast and horn beast used before?


I am back, got back yesterday.

No to all four, I personally have never heard those words used.

Your researches certainly lead you down some strange paths.

Fascinating.

I am at present reading a book by Amos Oz, "In the Land of Israel", and am learning a few new words myself. Smile
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Dec, 2005 12:16 pm
Are Stag, Ramp and Hoity-Toity Scottish terms?
Do you know any synonyms for kittie/kittock?
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Dec, 2005 02:44 pm
JGoldman10 wrote:
Are Stag, Ramp and Hoity-Toity Scottish terms?
Do you know any synonyms for kittie/kittock?


The first three are not particularly Scottish and have no special meaning that I am aware of, outside of their dictionary meaning.

Also I know of no synonyms for kittie/kittock.

It seems to me you are finding words which are either obscure, or are archaic. I am not sure where you get them, or where this is leading. I'm sorry I cannot be more positive or more helpful.
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Dec, 2005 03:00 pm
Are hard neck and fishgig slang terms used in Scotland?

Is "hard lass" actually a slang term?
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Dec, 2005 03:02 pm
Is a Herry the Scots equivalent of a Dublin Jackeen or an 'Arriet?

Is Roaring girl a Scottish slang term?

I know Meg is Scots slang for a romping woman-What about meg darts, or meg-harry?
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Dec, 2005 03:04 pm
"Hard neck" is. Or "brass neck".

"Hard lass" could be a slang term, yes.
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Dec, 2005 03:05 pm
Ramp, stag and Hoity-TOity are slang terms. According to the OED, hoit is a Scots word.
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Dec, 2005 03:07 pm
JGoldman10 wrote:
Is a Herry the Scots equivalent of a Dublin Jackeen or an 'Arriet?

Is Roaring girl a Scottish slang term?

I know Meg is Scots slang for a romping woman-What about meg darts, or meg-harry?


"Hairy" pronounced "herry" is a derogatory term for a common working girl or woman.

No knowledge of the other terms you mention here.
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Dec, 2005 03:20 pm
What is Scottish slang for a "large imposing woman"?
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Dec, 2005 03:21 pm
A nizzart is a sharp-faced perosn. Does that mean someone wtih a pointy nose or someone that's alert?
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Dec, 2005 01:04 am
JGoldman10 wrote:
What is Scottish slang for a "large imposing woman"?


I find it extremely difficult to answer some of these questions because the words you are dredging up seem to come from different "registers", ranging between Broad Scots, 17th Century Lallans and modern slang.

In modern Glasgow urban slang, I think a "large imposing woman" would just be referred to as a "big wumman".
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

deutsch anyone?? - Discussion by tell me why
Languages and Thought - Discussion by rosborne979
How many languages do you know ? - Discussion by mikinsmith
english to latin phrase translation - Discussion by chelsea84
What other languages would you use a2k in? - Discussion by Craven de Kere
Translation of names into Hebrew - Discussion by Sandra Karl
 
Copyright © 2023 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.04 seconds on 01/31/2023 at 08:59:21