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Message for McTag-need help with scots language

 
 
lmur
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Oct, 2005 02:42 pm
hi mctag, this is my first time on this (or any) forum.
the irish-gaelic word for rock is carraig which is well-nigh identical to its scots equivilent.
every second irish place name has "carraig" in the title eg carraigban (whiterock); carraigdubh (blackrock). we've great imagination, us paddies!

can you translate the ancient gaelic word "tsaborobhski"? does it mean heart of stone?
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McTag
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Oct, 2005 03:24 pm
Welcome Imur.

No I can't, unfortunately.

There was a Scottish climbing club called the Creag Dubh.

Eireann go bragh! (is that right?)
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lmur
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Oct, 2005 07:27 am
Eireann go Bragh is right (although it's one of those meaningless phrases nobody really understands, like "up and at 'em" and "vote Conservative".

I'll look forward to delving further into this A2K facility - it seems like a friendly forum. What part of Scotland are you originally from?
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McTag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Oct, 2005 10:37 am
From west of Glasgow, in the county formerly known as Renfrewshire.

I hope you get to know and like A2K as you use it more: I find it a friendly and useful, and quite diverse, forum.
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JGoldman10
 
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Reply Fri 28 Oct, 2005 01:47 pm
What about the words:
roche, rocke, roke and rok for rock?

I found some Scots spellings of "rock":
roik
rolk
rouk
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McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Oct, 2005 04:18 pm
JGoldman10 wrote:
What about the words:
roche, rocke, roke and rok for rock?

I found some Scots spellings of "rock":
roik
rolk
rouk


With respect, I would drop this line of enquiry, as I believe it leads nowhere.
These spellings are not recognised by me, and are probably archaic.

Spellings from the Middle Ages (vide Shakespeare manuscripts etc) are notoriously wayward, and I'm not sure what relevance these variations might have.

I don't know why you are trying to find out about Scots "rock", but maybe if I did, it might help a little.
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JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Oct, 2005 03:20 pm
Because "rock", I was told in any language, can be used figuratively to mena someone strong physically and emotionally.
Doesn't sturdy mean someone phy. and emotionally strong?
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McTag
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Oct, 2005 04:33 pm
Well of course you're right, figuratively speaking.

I would rather be thought craggy than a wee, coorin', tim'rous beastie.

Just the same, someone else spoke of "you rocks, you stones, you worse than senseless things", did he not.

You pays your money and you takes your choice.
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McTag
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Oct, 2005 04:39 pm
Okay "blocks", (having looked it up) I was close.
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Dartagnan
 
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Reply Mon 31 Oct, 2005 04:42 pm
McTag wrote:


Just the same, someone else spoke of "you rocks, you stones, you worse than senseless things", did he not.



That would be Shakespeare, would it not? Julius Caesar, if memory serves...

(By the way, McTag, your patience in this thread is truly admirable...)
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McTag
 
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Reply Mon 31 Oct, 2005 04:51 pm
Thanks Darty, but it's not patience exactly, I only write on A2K for fun. Smile
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JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Nov, 2005 04:55 pm
I meant you can refer to someone as a "rock" or "stone".
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McTag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Nov, 2005 01:34 am
JGoldman10 wrote:
I meant you can refer to someone as a "rock" or "stone".


That particular metaphor is not familiar to me in the context of Scots dialect...any more than in English.
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JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Nov, 2005 06:42 pm
Does sturdy mean someone strong physically and emotionally?

What about a "birkie" or a "carle"?
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JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Nov, 2005 06:43 pm
Is there a Scottish slang term for tomboy?
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McTag
 
  1  
Reply Fri 4 Nov, 2005 01:02 am
JGoldman10 wrote:
Does sturdy mean someone strong physically and emotionally?

What about a "birkie" or a "carle"?


These are derogatory terms (at least the first one is) seen in Burns' poetry.

A glossary of Lallans Scots would be of more use to you there than I can be.
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McTag
 
  1  
Reply Fri 4 Nov, 2005 01:07 am
JGoldman10 wrote:
Is there a Scottish slang term for tomboy?


Not one I am aware of.
You may like to look here:

http://www.scotland360.com/scotland/glasgow-slang.html

Good luck.
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McTag
 
  1  
Reply Fri 4 Nov, 2005 01:10 am
JGoldman10 wrote:
Does sturdy mean someone strong physically and emotionally?

What about a "birkie" or a "carle"?


p. s.

"Sturdy" has the same meanings as in English, I would say.
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McTag
 
  1  
Reply Fri 4 Nov, 2005 04:24 am
McTag wrote:
JGoldman10 wrote:
Does sturdy mean someone strong physically and emotionally?

What about a "birkie" or a "carle"?


A :These are derogatory terms (at least the first one is) seen in Burns' poetry.

B: A glossary of Lallans Scots would be of more use to you there than I can be.


A: I may be wrong about that, and was basing my answer on a line from Burns' poem "A Man's a Man For a' That", which runs

"Ye see yon birkie ca'ed a Lord ..."

but an online source I found later gave "birkie" as "a lively, plucky little fellow"

B: So that is thereby confirmed as good advice, I fear

Of course, language which was current 200 years ago has little relevance in today's dialect usage.

The rank is but the guinea stamp
The man's the gowd, for a' that"
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Sat 5 Nov, 2005 02:06 pm
Does anyone here how to contact Heeven?
0 Replies
 
 

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