Baldimo
 
  0  
Wed 16 Sep, 2015 01:22 pm
@TheCobbler,
Firing a warning shot is illegal. Firing a shot into the air is also illegal as what goes up must come down. This is in direct line with dumb ass Biden's advise he gave on guns a few years ago.

That unarmed Trayvon was in the process of assaulting Zimmerman when he got shot. You and Bob constantly using misinformation about the Martin/Zimmerman shootings.
0 Replies
 
TheCobbler
 
  1  
Wed 16 Sep, 2015 03:07 pm
Lest We forget: The 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama was bombed on Sunday, September 15, 1963 as an act of white supremacist terrorism.

Case

In the early morning of Sunday, September 15, 1963, Bobby Frank Cherry, Thomas Blanton, Herman Frank Cash, and Robert Chambliss, members of United Klans of America, a Ku Klux Klan group, planted a box of dynamite with a time delay under the steps of the church, near the basement. At about 10:22 a.m., twenty-six children were walking into the basement assembly room to prepare for the sermon entitled “The Love That Forgives,” when the bomb exploded. Four little girls, Addie Mae Collins (age 14), Denise McNair (age 11), Carole Robertson (age 14), and Cynthia Wesley (age 14), were killed in the attack, and more than 20 additional people were injured, one of whom was Addie Mae Collins' younger sister, Sarah. The explosion blew a hole in the church's rear wall, destroyed the back steps and all but one stained-glass window, which showed Christ leading a group of little children.
Civil rights activists blamed George Wallace, the Governor of Alabama, for the killings. Birmingham was a violent city and was nicknamed “Bombingham”, because the city had experienced more than 50 bombings in Black institutions and homes since World War I. Only a week before the bombing Wallace had told The New York Times that to stop integration Alabama needed a "few first-class funerals."

A witness identified Robert Edward Chambliss, a member of the Ku Klux Klan, as the man who placed the bomb under the steps of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. He was arrested but only charged with possessing a box of 122 sticks of dynamite without a permit. On October 8, 1963, Chambliss received a hundred-dollar fine and a six-month jail sentence for having the dynamite. At the time, no federal charges were filed on Chambliss.
The case was unsolved until Bill Baxley was elected Attorney General of Alabama. He requested the original Federal Bureau of Investigation files on the case and discovered that the FBI had accumulated evidence against the named suspects that had not been revealed to the prosecutors by order of J. Edgar Hoover. The files were used to reopen the case in 1971.

In November 1977, the seemingly forgotten case of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing was brought to Court, where Chambliss, now aged 73, was tried once again and was found guilty and sentenced to life imprisonment. Chambliss died in Lloyd Noland Hospital and Health Center on October 29, 1985.

On May 18, 2000, the FBI announced that the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing had been carried out by the Ku Klux Klan splinter group the Cahaba Boys. It was claimed that four men, the afore-mentioned Robert Edward Chambliss, Herman Frank Cash, Thomas Edwin Blanton, Jr. and Bobby Frank Cherry had been responsible for the crime. Cash was dead but Blanton and Cherry were arrested, and both have since been tried and convicted.

Reactions and aftermath

The explosions increased anger and tension, which were already high in Birmingham. The Mayor of Birmingham, Albert Boutwell, said: “It is just sickening that a few individuals could commit such a horrible atrocity.” Two more Black children were shot to death approximately seven hours following the Sunday morning bombing, 16-year-old Johnny Robinson and 13-year-old Virgil Ware. Robinson was shot by police, reportedly after they caught him throwing rocks at cars and he ignored orders to halt as he fled down an alley. Ware was "shot from ambush" as he and his brother rode their bicycles in a residential suburb, 15 miles north of the city; UPI reported: "Two white youths seen riding a motorcycle in the area were sought by police."

In spite of everything, the newly integrated schools continued to meet. Schools had been integrated the previous Tuesday with black and white children in the same classrooms for the first time in that city.

As the news story about the four girls reached the national and international press, many felt that they had not taken the Civil Rights struggle seriously enough. A Milwaukee Sentinel editorial opined, “For the rest of the nation, the Birmingham church bombing should serve to goad the conscience. The deaths…in a sense are on the hands of each of us.”

The city of Birmingham initially offered a $52,000 reward for the arrest of the bombers. Governor George Wallace, an outspoken segregationalist, offered an additional $5,000. However, civil rights activist Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. wired Wallace that "the blood of four little children ... is on your hands. Your irresponsible and misguided actions have created in Birmingham and Alabama the atmosphere that has induced continued violence and now murder."

Following the tragic event, white strangers visited the grieving families to express their sorrow. At the funeral for three of the girls (one family preferred a separate, private funeral), Martin Luther King, Jr. spoke about life being "as hard as crucible steel." More than 8,000 mourners, including 800 clergymen of all races, attended the service. No city officials attended. The bombing continued to increase worldwide sympathy for the civil rights cause. On July 2, 1964, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, ensuring equal rights of African Americans before the law.

Later prosecutions

FBI investigations gathered evidence pointing to four suspects: Robert Chambliss, Thomas E. Blanton Jr, Herman Cash, and Bobby Frank Cherry. According to a later report from the Bureau, “By 1965, we had serious suspects—namely, Robert E. Chambliss, Bobby Frank Cherry, Herman Frank Cash, and Thomas E. Blanton, Jr., all KKK members—but witnesses were reluctant to talk and physical evidence was lacking. Also, at that time, information from our surveillances was not admissible in court. As a result, no federal charges were filed in the ’60s.” Although Chambliss was convicted on an explosives charge, no convictions were obtained in the 1960s for the killings.

Alabama Attorney General William Baxley reopened the investigation after he took office in 1971, requesting evidence from the FBI and building trust with key witnesses who had been reluctant to testify in the first trial. The prosecutor had been a student at the University of Alabama when he heard about the bombing in 1963. “I wanted to do something, but I didn’t know what.”
In 1977 former Ku Klux Klansman Robert "Dynamite Bob" Chambliss was indicted in the murder of all four girls, tried and convicted of the first-degree murder of Denise McNair, and sentenced to life in prison. He died eight years later in prison.

Thomas Edwin Blanton, Jr. was tried in 2001 and found guilty at age 62 of four counts of murder and sentenced to life in prison.

Herman Frank Cash died in 1994 without having been charged. Bobby Frank Cherry, also a former Klansman, was indicted in 2001 along with Blanton. Judge James Garrett of Jefferson County Circuit Court ruled "that Mr. Cherry's trial would be delayed indefinitely because a court-ordered psychiatric evaluation concluded that he was mentally incompetent.” He was later convicted in 2002, sentenced to life in prison, and died in 2004.

Source: Wikipedia

https://scontent-lga1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpf1/v/t1.0-9/10629603_10155987211895184_8351348541429812427_n.jpg?oh=0c58eac2975508a6a3fa3af8c166b00a&oe=566A67A3

https://scontent-lga1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xtp1/v/t1.0-9/11064722_10155987234095184_2218408910986318483_n.jpg?oh=9caa3974982fc091f5b611c327325441&oe=56A46A28

https://scontent-lga1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xfl1/v/t1.0-9/12002872_10155987236975184_7828848791065123318_n.jpg?oh=93dd6e2324ff4454302149f4de2f933e&oe=569E3AFF

https://scontent-lga1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpf1/t31.0-8/11952743_10155987238270184_826802741360626493_o.jpg

Consider, it is now republicans today attacking our public schools and black churches...
TheCobbler
 
  1  
Wed 16 Sep, 2015 04:07 pm
https://scontent-lga1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xfl1/v/t1.0-9/12038468_10206739963151846_8228502853179076344_n.jpg?oh=24c72694cd44e318f35f57c5bf0d1191&oe=56A78740

So will the prosecutions and incarcerations of racist cops, and you know what the prisons think of crooked cops! Your days are numbered...
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Wed 16 Sep, 2015 04:18 pm
@TheCobbler,
Quote:
Consider, it is now republicans today attacking our public schools and black churches...

I am so glad that we are so tied into the Klan to know that they are R's. I myself have never seen this claim from a reputable source.
0 Replies
 
snood
 
  3  
Thu 17 Sep, 2015 09:54 am
"He’s a f*cking kid": Video shows nine California cops arrest sobbing black teen "for jaywalking"

http://www.rawstory.com/2015/09/video-shows-nine-cops-arrest-crying-black-teen-for-jaywalking/comments/#disqus

...Eight other officers begin arriving at that point, and they lift the teen up and walk him several feet away from the wall before slamming the teen onto the sidewalk.

Four officers then pile on top of the teen and pin him to the ground before handcuffing him, as the other four officer stand guard and attempt to block the Avendaño’s camera angle.

The officers pull the handcuffed teen to his feet, and the teen sobs as he’s led to a patrol car as the bystander continues yelling at officers.

Under California law, jaywalking is an infraction, not a misdemeanor, carrying fines up to $191.
Baldimo
 
  1  
Thu 17 Sep, 2015 10:47 am
@TheCobbler,
Because you are not smart enough to understand that saying is, it goes:

"The beating will continue until moral improves."

I heard it used in the military while we were in basic training and then a few times while on deployment.

As I've said to Bob on more than one hating occasion. I sure hope you cop haters don't ever have to call the police. It will just destroy you to have to rely on the very people you hate...
snood
 
  3  
Thu 17 Sep, 2015 10:54 am
@Baldimo,
Baldimo wrote:

Because you are not smart enough to understand that saying is, it goes:

"The beating will continue until moral improves."

I heard it used in the military while we were in basic training and then a few times while on deployment.

As I've said to Bob on more than one hating occasion. I sure hope you cop haters don't ever have to call the police. It will just destroy you to have to rely on the very people you hate...



One is not a "cop hater" for hating when cops do the wrong thing. One would be an abysmal idiot or an automatron not to hate unjust brutality and murder - by anyone, including cops. And it won't "destroy" me to call them just like I rely on any municipal employee - garbagemen to pick up trash, metermaids to ticket overdue parked cars - cops to chase criminals.
BillRM
 
  0  
Thu 17 Sep, 2015 11:41 am
@snood,
Quote:
One is not a "cop hater" for hating when cops do the wrong thing. One would be an abysmal idiot or an automatron not to hate unjust brutality and murder - by anyone, including cops.


It is however being a cop hater to assumed that a cop did anything wrong before the facts are known when a cop shoot a black citizen such as in the case of Mr. Brown.

Lot of cops haters on this website.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Thu 17 Sep, 2015 11:44 am
@snood,
Cripes.

I'm getting more and more glad for bystanders with camera phones.
0 Replies
 
hingehead
 
  7  
Thu 17 Sep, 2015 07:02 pm
I thought this was cogent

Next time someone tells you "all lives matter," show them this cartoon
Updated by German Lopez on September 4, 2015, 8:21 a.m. ET @germanrlopez [email protected]
Source

https://cdn1.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/LqpCQyT9KPr8vVXBmCB2DZ-X_4U=/800x0/filters:no_upscale()/cdn0.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_asset/file/4027016/all%20lives%20matter%20cartoon.png

The point of Black Lives Matter isn't to suggest that black lives should be or are more important than all other lives, but instead that black people's lives are relatively undervalued in the US (and more likely to be ended by police), and the country needs to recognize that inequity to bring an end to it.

Reddit user GeekAesthete made this point in a thread explaining why the phrase "all lives matter" is offensive:

Quote:
Imagine that you're sitting down to dinner with your family, and while everyone else gets a serving of the meal, you don't get any. So you say "I should get my fair share." And as a direct response to this, your dad corrects you, saying, "everyone should get their fair share." Now, that's a wonderful sentiment -- indeed, everyone should, and that was kinda your point in the first place: that you should be a part of everyone, and you should get your fair share also. However, dad's smart-ass comment just dismissed you and didn't solve the problem that you still haven't gotten any!


Straub's cartoon echoes this point: If a house is burning down, you're obviously going to focus on putting out the fire instead of watering a house that's just fine. In this analogy, black lives are the burning house, and everyone else is living much more comfortably in the house that isn't burning down. Clearly, one is a bigger problem.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Thu 17 Sep, 2015 07:04 pm
@hingehead,
Emergencies dont last for hundreds of years. And blacks have plenty of opportunity, they just refuse to take advantage of it.

I am not moved by your cartoon.
hingehead
 
  3  
Thu 17 Sep, 2015 07:08 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
I am not moved by your cartoon.


I'm deeply shocked, you've always displayed so much empathy in the past zen master.

0 Replies
 
snood
 
  7  
Thu 17 Sep, 2015 07:09 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

Emergencies dont last for hundreds of years. And blacks have plenty of opportunity, they just refuse to take advantage of it.

I am not moved by your cartoon.

So basically if blacks just got their **** together they'd no longer have any problems from racism, you figure?
hawkeye10
 
  2  
Thu 17 Sep, 2015 07:21 pm
@snood,
I think we promise equal opportunity not equal outcomes and largely succeed, and that a huge part of the problems the BLM are complaining about blacks contribute to by choosing to be criminals, by not cooperating with the police and by glorifying gang culture.

So ya, my sympathy tank is running on low.
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  0  
Thu 17 Sep, 2015 07:22 pm
@snood,
snood wrote:


...So basically if blacks just got their **** together they'd no longer have any problems from racism, you figure?


Can you explain why the West Indian Blacks function economically and educationally at a different level than American Blacks in NYC?

My layman's opinion is that West Indian Blacks came to the U.S. with a level of self-esteem that was not damaged by the Jim Crow experience, plus the positive influence of being from a nation that the people in charge are all from their background racially. Sort of like why Israeli Jews do not have the image of timidity that American Jews have. Nothing like autonomy to allow a person to reach their maximum effectiveness, perhaps. Just my lay opinion.

But to give an opinion to your question above, I believe that West Indian Blacks have the self-esteem to ignore much of the white attitude that American Blacks might interpret as racism. And, I've heard that American Blacks might think that West Indians have a superiority complex. Based on the jobs that West Indians hold, a complex is not what causes the resentment. It just might be the higher level of goals and achievement.
hawkeye10
 
  2  
Thu 17 Sep, 2015 07:26 pm
@Foofie,
Can snood explain why Asians and Hispanics tend so say that blacks are lazy whiners, and that this is why they fail, not because whites suck?

The guilt trip for what my ancestors did does not work on me, show me what I am as a white person doing wrong, or what my peers are doing wrong. And be specific. I will look at the complaint and get back to you (the figurative you, whom ever is complaining)

"our lives suck" does not move after all the candy that has been handed out to people who are lucky enough to have dark skin over my lifetime. For any further candy handouts I want cause and effect laid out, backed up by evidence.
Foofie
 
  0  
Thu 17 Sep, 2015 08:01 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

Can snood explain why Asians and Hispanics tend so say that blacks are lazy whiners, and that this is why they fail, not because whites suck?

The guilt trip for what my ancestors did does not work on me, show me what I am as a white person doing wrong, or what my peers are doing wrong. And be specific. I will look at the complaint and get back to you (the figurative you, whom ever is complaining)

"our lives suck" does not move after all the candy that has been handed out to people who are lucky enough to have dark skin over my lifetime. For any further candy handouts I want cause and effect laid out, backed up by evidence.


In my opinion, the above style of management has gone out of style. It might have been used by the British Navy during their empire days.

Plus, resenting those that get handouts might just be the other side of the coin for those that resent the 1%. It seems that many people begrudge those that have, that haven't sweated enough? My approach is just to keep one's own house in order, and not be concerned who has an unearned slice of pie. Otherwise, we will just have a more divisive country, in my opinion.
0 Replies
 
TheCobbler
 
  1  
Thu 17 Sep, 2015 09:59 pm
@snood,
I think the problem lies with both but mostly whites today. There are black republicans, consider that for one moment. There are also black racists that would have, without hesitation, reversed slavery's past.

http://www.kyma.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Ben_Carson_by_Gage_Skidmore_2.jpg

This man is apparently no LESS abhorrent than his white racist counterparts...

We are all equally humans with the same burden of recognizing intrinsic equality.

The same "slavery" that happened in America happened in Egypt and Persia many years earlier. Yea, millions of "white" slaves built the ancient mosques in Persia...

Racial slavery is not the issue now, it is the slavery that is facilitated by the plutocracy that is now the greatest of concerns and considerations. Don't let petty racism detract us from the real money "masters"...

Britain nearly enslaved the entire world, including India.

ALL humans are capable of racism...

Race requires a strict balance through the ages... This is the very meaning of "civilization"...
TheCobbler
 
  2  
Thu 17 Sep, 2015 10:34 pm
It appears that Ben Carson is bought off by the Kochs, no less, than his white "racist" counterparts...
0 Replies
 
snood
 
  3  
Thu 17 Sep, 2015 10:53 pm
@TheCobbler,
TheCobbler wrote:

I think the problem lies with both but mostly whites today. There are black republicans, consider that for one moment. There are also black racists that would have, without hesitation, reversed slavery's past.

http://www.kyma.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Ben_Carson_by_Gage_Skidmore_2.jpg

This man is apparently no LESS abhorrent than his white racist counterparts...

We are all equally humans with the same burden of recognizing intrinsic equality.

The same "slavery" that happened in America happened in Egypt and Persia many years earlier. Yea, millions of "white" slaves built the ancient mosques in Persia...

Racial slavery is not the issue now, it is the slavery that is facilitated by the plutocracy that is now the greatest of concerns and considerations. Don't let petty racism detract us from the real money "masters"...

Britain nearly enslaved the entire world, including India.

ALL humans are capable of racism...

Race requires a strict balance through the ages... This is the very meaning of "civilization"...


I heard a quote from an older black man a while back. I think it was the father of J.C.Watts, a once prominent black republican. The quote was "A black man voting republican is about like a chicken voting for Colonel Sanders." I thought - that about says it.
 

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