31
   

Is 'colored people' offensive?

 
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 01:36 pm
@layman,
Although maybe the positioning of words, adjective first noun second , sounds more like an insult.

You would say He's a stupid person, but wouldn't say He's a person of stupidity. However, both, He's an intelligent person, and He's a person of intelligence, are acceptable.

layman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 01:40 pm
@izzythepush,
Quote:
You would say He's a stupid person, but wouldn't say He's a person of stupidity. However, both, He's an intelligent person, and He's a person of intelligence, are acceptable.


Maybe that's the key, in some sense. "Intelligence" is deemed to be a positive attribute.

Those who object to the phrase "colored people," seem to be tacitly assuming that "color" is a negative, undesirable, attribute.

Then they take it a step further: Because "I" think it's a negative attribute, I have to assume that "you" also think that. Therefore I can only conclude that you intend to degrade someone if you say they are "colored."

The "thinking" here, whatever it is, is rather puzzling.
contrex
 
  4  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 01:46 pm
@layman,
layman wrote:
Those who object to the phrase "colored people," seem to be tacitly assuming that "color" is a negative, undesirable, attribute.

Those who object to the phrase are objecting to that assumption, held by those who use the phrase.

contrex
 
  2  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 01:47 pm
@layman,
layman wrote:
Then they take it a step further: Because "I" think it's a negative attribute, I have to assume that "you" also think that. Therefore I can only conclude that you intend to degrade someone if you say they are "colored."

That is bollocks.
layman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 01:49 pm
@contrex,
Quote:

That is bollocks.


Yes, of course it is.

I'm just speculating as to why the phrase "colored people" is (or should be) considered to be inherently offensive by some.
layman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 01:53 pm
@contrex,
Quote:

Those who object to the phrase are objecting to that assumption, held by those who use the phrase.


Yeah, that's what I said, contrex. They seem to impute beliefs, and therefore intentions, to others which are probably not even held by those they condemn.

Nice to have the ability to read minds, I'm sure.

But the question remains: Why would I impute such beliefs to you unless, at some level, I held such beliefs myself?

As far as I know, the phrase "colored people" was always considered to be a respectful way of referring to a class of people. I don't when, if ever, it was used as an intended insult.
layman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 02:24 pm
@layman,
Quote:
As far as I know, the phrase "colored people" was always considered to be a respectful way of referring to a class of people.


Considered as such by those using it, I mean, of course.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 02:30 pm
@layman,
layman wrote:
Yeah, that's what I said, contrex. They seem to impute beliefs, and therefore intentions, to others which are probably not even held by those they condemn.

Nice to have the ability to read minds, I'm sure.

But the question remains: Why would I impute such beliefs to you unless, at some level, I held such beliefs myself?

As far as I know, the phrase "colored people" was always considered to be a respectful way of referring to a class of people. I don't when, if ever, it was used as an intended insult.

The term was common parlance in the 1960s, but its origins are the problem. It comes from the ideology of racism, that white people are white, and everyone else is somehow other coloured. It fails to recognise that everyone has an ethnicity and is an inadequate "one-size-fits all" description.

Nor was it a term chosen by those it refers to, but instead imposed by the wider - and white - society. I wonder if you are you on the autistic spectrum because "the ability to read minds" is something that people on the AS often lack compared to neurotypicals, if by that expression you mean the ability to evaluate the feelings and attitudes of others.
layman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 02:38 pm
@contrex,
Quote:
It comes from the ideology of racism, that white people are white, and everyone else is somehow other coloured


"Ideology of racism?" Do tell. For some unknown reason, the leadership at the NAACP seems to think otherwise.

Perhaps it is just one way of making an obvious distinction which has an empirical basis.

Ever think of that? Or do you just think everyone is an ideologue, as you are starting to appear to be, contrex?
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  3  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 02:47 pm
@layman,
All of those terms would be found offensive, in fact very offensive, in Canada.

0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  3  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 02:48 pm
@layman,
layman wrote:

But the question remains: Why would I impute such beliefs to you unless, at some level, I held such beliefs myself?


bit of an instigator eh

0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 02:48 pm
@layman,
layman wrote:

I'm just speculating as to why the phrase "colored people" is (or should be) considered to be inherently offensive by some.


read some sociology and history texts
layman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 02:59 pm
@ehBeth,
Quote:
layman wrote:


" I'm just speculating as to why the phrase "colored people" is (or should be) considered to be inherently offensive by some."

read some sociology and history texts


What would I expect "sociology and history texts" to tell me about the inherent meaning of a word, ehBeth? Any particular tome(s) you would recommend?
ehBeth
 
  5  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 03:01 pm
@layman,
not falling for your attempts to instigate
0 Replies
 
layman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 03:11 pm
@ehBeth,
For what it's worth:

"In 2008 Carla Sims, communications director for the NAACP in Washington, D.C., said "the term 'colored' is not derogatory, [the NAACP] chose the word 'colored' because it was the most positive description commonly used [in 1909, when the association was founded]. It's outdated and antiquated but not offensive."
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 03:13 pm
@layman,
layman wrote:
What would I expect "sociology and history texts" to tell me about the inherent meaning of a word, ehBeth? Any particular tome(s) you would recommend?


I've always been very fond of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, call me old fashioned, but those leather bound volumes do have a certain quiet authority.

Although I'm not going to miss the stalls selling them at every school fete and county show.

Come to think of it, I'm glad they've gone online.
0 Replies
 
layman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 03:41 pm
@contrex,
If you take offense at something I say, then it surely follows, as a matter of fact, that I gave offense, right?

Well, maybe not. Not everything a person possesses was necessarily freely given by it's former possessor. Sometimes things are just stolen.
FOUND SOUL
 
  2  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 03:51 pm
@layman,
In layman terms, yes, it is offensive you don't need to study, look it up, find sources, rather answer with your own thoughts.
layman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 03:59 pm
@FOUND SOUL,
Quote:
...yes, it is offensive you don't need to study, look it up, find sources...


I'm not sure I understand what you're saying, Soul, but I think I do.

But who (or what) should I study that will show me that "colored people" is inherently offensive. Would I be compelled to ignore people like Carla Sims, for example:

"In 2008 Carla Sims, communications director for the NAACP in Washington, D.C., said "the term 'colored' is not derogatory, [the NAACP] chose the word 'colored' because it was the most positive description commonly used [in 1909, when the association was founded]. It's outdated and antiquated but not offensive."

According to some here, poor Ms. Sims is a primitive who has failed to "evolve." But what if I have a different opinion of her? Then what?
FOUND SOUL
 
  2  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 05:36 pm
@layman,
Quote:
But what if I have a different opinion of her? Then what?


People that think for themselves, have their own opinion. They read things take what they want from it, ditch what they don't.

My point was exactly that. We are our own person, make our own decisions, have our own thoughts.

It is offensive "in my opinion" just as it may be if someone told you that you were an ugly bald fat dude that made them want to puke...

There is no need for study of any description... It's a question that merely requires an answer of ones thoughts.
 

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