31
   

Is 'colored people' offensive?

 
 
hawkeye10
 
  -3  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 03:08 am
@contrex,
Quote:
Incidentally when my British brother-in-law was over from the States with his American wife (a very annoying person), when they arrived at our house, she said she was worried if the rental car would be safe parked outside our house in Bristol. After some prodding she said it was because she had seen a black guy in a nearby street.
your blacks tend to be a lot more dark than ours, and people who are biased against blacks tend to subconscious equate darker with worst. So you can understand where that comment came from.
contrex
 
  4  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 03:51 am
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:
So you can understand where that comment came from.

I understood exactly where that comment came from.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 04:18 am
@Setanta,
It's not got the same impact over here, it's seen more as an outdated rather than an offensive term.

As always those who are quick to take offence have focused on the language used rather than the message, which is that there aren't enough jobs for non white actors.
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 04:20 am
@contrex,
contrex wrote:
Quote:
3. Does the term 'African-Americans' only refer to 'black people in the US?' Can those black people in U.K. also are called 'African-Americans'?


Only in the US! How could it be otherwise? (But what about tourists from e.g. Jamaica or South Africa?) It often amuses British black people when US visitors call them "African Americans".


What a stupid bloody question.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  3  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 04:21 am
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:
your blacks tend to be a lot more dark than ours,

Talk about generalising based on prejudice and ignorance.
hawkeye10
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 04:29 am
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:

hawkeye10 wrote:
your blacks tend to be a lot more dark than ours,

Talk about generalising based on prejudice and ignorance.

No, there is a study on the darkness of negroes over the globe, and yours are darker than ours. The opposite of prejudice and ingorance is truth, inconvenient or otherwise.
Setanta
 
  5  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 04:37 am
@hawkeye10,
Have you got a citations for this alleged "study," Mr. Evidence? Even if you did have it, it would not excuse the rank bigotry of someone who assumes that a person is more likely to be a criminal if their skin is darker. You really don't get these kinds of things because you're so bloody stupid.
contrex
 
  3  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 04:44 am
Hawkeye probably thinks that British black people can run faster after they have stolen something, and they consume more watermelons and fried chicken, because of a study he read on Stormfront.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 05:21 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

Have you got a citations for this alleged "study," Mr. Evidence?


Don't hold your breath.
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  5  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 09:24 am
@hawkeye10,
This is a joke, right?

Please tell me you were joking.

Nobody could be that much of a twat, could they?
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 10:58 am
@Lordyaswas,
Hawkeye's massive ego is in inverse proportion to his intelligence, which is why he can never see how much of a twat he is.
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 11:16 am
Shouldn't that be "are" colored people offensive? Some may be. But every one of these threads regarding what other people should feel about what a majority calls them, is offensive.
layman
 
  2  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 11:18 am
@izzythepush,
Quote:
As always those who are quick to take offence have focused on the language used rather than the message


Exactly, Izzy. It seems obvious that the guy intended no offense. And yet it is somehow "offensive."

Many act as though words can be inherently offensive, in themselves. For them the offense is in the word, not the intent of the one using it.

Hence they want , for example, to keep Huck Finn out of schools.

0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  5  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 11:22 am
@hawkeye10,
Could you even try to be more unintentionally offensive? Seriously, I cringed when I read that and I couldn't disagree with you more. I actually felt sorry for your ignorance. Then I remembered. You aren't ignorant. Your stupid. "More black than ...... what the hell is that supposed to mean other than the obvious?
korkamann
 
  4  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 11:53 am
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
your blacks tend to be a lot more dark than ours, and people who are biased against blacks tend to subconscious equate darker with worst. So you can understand where that comment came from.


Your verbosity is exceeded only by your total stupidity.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 11:57 am
@bobsal u1553115,
It's nonsense, the darkness of one's colour is dictated by how much sun you get. Once I was teaching Sujata Bhatt's poem Search for My Tongue to a bunch of lads from mixed backgrounds. The poem is very much about the experience of the second/third generation immigrant and about reconciling one's culture to new surroundings.

There were a lot of lads whose parents hailed from the Indian subcontinent who went back to visit relatives in the old country every 2 or 3 years or so. I thought this would be something they could relate to, the feeling of being alien in both cultures.

I asked them about their impressions of their overseas relatives. As one they all said that their relatives were black. That was the first thing they noticed. And they were darker because the Indian sun is so much stronger than its British counterpart.
0 Replies
 
argome321
 
  3  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 01:05 pm
". Does the term 'African-Americans' only refer to 'black people in the US?' Can those black people in U.K. also are called 'African-Americans'?
I'd like to know if 'African-Americans' only indicate those black people in the U.S. or that includes those in other countries as well."

How can anyone born in the UK be of any American descent if his parents aren't Americans, naturalized or born there?

second, reading about the civil rights movement of the 1960's in the U S A should clear things up. do a little research people.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  3  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 01:21 pm
@bobsal u1553115,
bobsal u1553115 wrote:
Shouldn't that be "are" colored people offensive?

No, because "colored people" is a phrase. In any case, I think this is about the fuss made when Benedict Cumberbatch used it, and, being British, he said "coloured people".

layman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 01:26 pm
@izzythepush,
From what I understand the phrase "colored people" is deemed (by some, or many) to be inherently offensive (perhaps "extremely offensive," I don't know).

But many (if not most) of those same people do not consider the phrase "people of color" to be offensive at all.

Go figure.
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2015 01:31 pm
@layman,
That's just one of many things I don't understand about America.
0 Replies
 
 

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