25
   

Potty-Mouthed Princesses Drop F-Bombs for Feminism by FCKH8.com

 
 
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Fri 24 Oct, 2014 01:58 am
@chai2,
Quote:
It's the pathetic adult who would come away after watching that with strictly the notion that "they were making those sweet little girls say those words." and not be able to see the message behind it.


Oh ya, the ends justify the means argument.

No.
0 Replies
 
Pearlylustre
 
  2  
Reply Fri 24 Oct, 2014 06:07 am
@hingehead,
I love this ad. Kids are so much smarter and tougher than they're given credit for. It's a performance - not what they say when they're having lunch with their grandma. When my 19yo daughter was that age I would definitely have preferred her to appear in something like this than some tacky, over-sexualised beauty pageant. Happily so far she hasn't needed a t-shirt to tell her how to live her life anyway.

Pearly (proud mum of a maths and chemistry whiz and surgeon-to-be because thankfully no one's ever told her that's not what girls do)
Lordyaswas
 
  5  
Reply Fri 24 Oct, 2014 06:33 am
@Pearlylustre,
So, taking my grandma analogy one step further, would you (or she) have been happy to agree to her wearing just provocative underwear at that age, poledancing and twerking to a song which protested against the patronising sexual objectification of women?

I just think that the message is excellent, but the vehicle a bit dodgy for the participating kids in both their present and future lives, possibly.

I bet those weirdo guys out there also love it, but for all the wrong reasons.



izzythepush
 
  5  
Reply Fri 24 Oct, 2014 07:30 am
@Lordyaswas,
My daughter has issues with the site the video came from, it's transgender phobic and cuts and pastes other people's work from the net without crediting them.
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Oct, 2014 01:50 pm
Pearly and chai2 - I found the video through a Facebook friend, who is an amazing woman for reasons I can't tell you because they would identify her (not that she'd mind, but I don't haver her permission), she loved it too . You're both in good company.
0 Replies
 
Germlat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Oct, 2014 01:57 pm
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:

My daughter has issues with the site the video came from, it's transgender phobic and cuts and pastes other people's work from the net without crediting them.

The guy that was a single parent has the vote...male or female. ...go figure..maybe it's because he's seen both sides of the fence.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  4  
Reply Fri 24 Oct, 2014 02:22 pm
Max obsessionally fears feminism. He thinks they're out to accuse him of rape. He also seems to think that rape and other forms of sexual assault don't actually occur so much as the women as a class use such accusations to willfully harm men.

Max is a nut case.

I enjoyed readig this thread, even Max's whack-a-loon comments.
One Eyed Mind
 
  0  
Reply Fri 24 Oct, 2014 02:54 pm
@Setanta,
Taking people's arguments out of context, like saying he's a nutcase, when he was calmly addressing the arguments as an individual, which contradicts your claims, while other people were being nutcases with gang mentality, is easy.

I can do it too. You're not special. You're not smart. Otherwise, you wouldn't have typed out this egregious post.

Here's a challenge: Instead of "saying" that about Max; "Prove" that about Max.
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Oct, 2014 03:12 pm
@Setanta,
lol
0 Replies
 
Pearlylustre
 
  2  
Reply Fri 24 Oct, 2014 03:15 pm
@Lordyaswas,
Quote:
would you (or she) have been happy to agree to her wearing just provocative underwear at that age, poledancing and twerking to a song which protested against the patronising sexual objectification of women?

That is not the same thing. The girls in this video aren't sexualised and I think they've been very careful about making them 'pretty', not sexy. The weirdo guys can easily find much more enticing images than this to get off on - try a google image search for 'girls' clothing'. In reality I might not have let my daughter do this video to protect her from the possible reaction of grandma et al to the language. The parents of these girls will have made their decision based on their own circumstances. Throughout my kids' school lives I saw parents make a lot more damaging decisions every day.
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  4  
Reply Fri 24 Oct, 2014 03:26 pm
The language itself in that video didn't bother me, and I actually thought it had a comic effect coming from little girls in princess dresses. And I do think there are far worse words than f--k, I think the N-word is one of them. But, at the end, when I realized this was nothing more than a pitch to sell T-shirts, I felt manipulated and angry.

What bothers me about the video is the exploitation of the children, and the women's issues content, for the sole purpose of selling T-shirts. This isn't about sincere support for a social message, coming from a group affiliated with that message, it's a commercial that employs shock value language from children as an attention grabber, that was made by a T-shirt manufacturer, in order to increase their own profits. It's just a sleazy way of this company peddling their wares, and apparently they've done this in the past with other issues, like racism and the events in Ferguson.
Quote:
The many, many problems with FCKH8′s ‘potty-mouthed princess’ video
By Caitlin Dewey
October 23

Most people would agree the gender wage-gap is bad. But is it more or less bad than profit-motivated adults instructing little girls to curse for a viral video?

That is, in a nutshell, the false equivalence at the heart of a new and wildly controversial video by the T-shirt brand FCKH8, which since Tuesday has racked up more than 100,000 views on YouTube alone. The video consists of girls, ages six to 13, dropping frequent F-bombs in a discussion of pay inequality, stereotypical gender roles and sexual violence — a concept far more dangerous to the six-year-old mind, some might argue, than any casual curse words could be...

Presumably, if you do find the girls’ language offensive, you’re not a very good feminist. And if you don’t find the girls’ language offensive, you are — to paraphrase one breathlessly horrified conservative blogger — an Occupy Wall Streeter, an atheist, or a “sexually confused and anti-American angry woman.”

So regardless of your feelings on f-bombs, feminism, and the viral-industrial complex more generally, nobody wins here. Except FCKH8, of course, which is kind of the whole idea.

FCKH8 is, after all, a for-profit company, owned entirely by Synergy Media — a corporate branding studio that specializes in (whaddya know!) marketing. Each T-shirt FCKH8 sells retails for between $15 and $37, five dollars of which the company promises to donate to charity. After FCKH8’s last campaign — in which the company had children from Ferguson, Mo. read statistics on racism to “white people” — that cut went to the Mike Brown Memorial Fund and the NAACP. Critics, of whom there are many, were not impressed.

“Everything, it seems, can distilled, packaged, bought and sold — including racism,” wrote Colorlines’ Aura Bogado, one of many to fault FCKH8 for making money off Ferguson’s tragedy.

This new campaign, with its new feel-good issue, doesn’t stray too far from that script: It’s still about provoking solely for provocation’s sake. There’s the age of the girls in question. The fact that they’re all dressed like “pretty princesses.” The casual deployment of phrases like “pay up, motherf***er,” which just rings gratuitous. (FCKH8 has, for its part, defended the video as a strong statement against sexism.)

Nevermind that the video would have made a far more credible point about rape and gender roles and the wage gap — not to mention, social and moral norms — if adults starred in it instead of little kids.

“What’s more offensive?” FCKH8 tries to ask. “A little girl saying f***, or the sexist way society treats girls and women?”

Whatever the answer, it’s clearly good business for FCKH8: The company has built a veritable empire by throwing the veil of social good over more capitalist ambitions. Power to you, guys. You’re clever businessmen. Just don’t expect us to laud your grand stand for feminism — been there, done that, will not buy the T-shirt.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-intersect/wp/2014/10/23/the-many-many-problems-with-fckh8s-potty-mouthed-princess-video/


This is some of the controversy that FCKH8 generated with their Ferguson related racism ads.
Quote:

By Gavia Baker-Whitelaw 
September 15, 2014

A clothing company's anti-racism T-shirt is getting some hate of its own.

FCKH8 is best known for selling T-shirts with slogans such as “Straight Against Hate” and “Some dudes marry dudes. Get over it.” But recently, the company branched out into what it describes as “anti-racism gear.”

This move is already causing some controversy, partly due to the T-shirt campaign’s link to the protests in Ferguson, Mo.

The new FCKH8 T-shirts, wristbands and bumper stickers are printed with the slogan, “Racism isn’t over. But I’m over racism.” Although FCKH8 is a for-profit company, $5 from each T-shirt, hoodie and tank top will be donated to anti-racism organizations such as the NAACP and the Mike Brown Memorial Fund. These products were launched with a viral video titled Hey White People, which features six kids from Ferguson quoting statistics about racism in the U.S.

You can view the video Hey White People here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KQfg52m0-4o&feature=player_detailpage

FCKH8’s Mike Kon said that the T-shirts “[give] people a way to turn their chests into little billboards to speak out against the evil of racism and start an important conversation our nation needs to have.”

However, this campaign has already run into some pushback from the very organizations that it was intending to promote. Race Forward, one of the charities originally listed on FCKH8’s anti-racism apparel page, quickly posted to Facebook, saying that they would not accept any donations from FCKH8. Colorlines, a news and commentary site published by Race Forward, then posted an article under the headline, “This is the company making money off of Ferguson,” criticizing FCKH8’s T-shirt campaign and viral video.

Colorlines described FCKH8’s video as showing children “reciting parts of a script that’s clearly been written by adults,” and went on to mention the for-profit nature of FCKH8, which is owned by corporate branding firm Synergy Media.

FCKH8 responded in a lengthy post on their website, saying that Colorlines and Race Forward were using “Click-baiting, Race-baiting, Homophobia, Minimizing Ferguson Residents, Trivializing Breast Cancer Awareness Efforts & Distorting Facts to Get Views & Donations.”

In answer to comments pointing out the potentially problematic nature of hiring a white director to cast African American children in an ad for anti-racism T-shirts, FCKH8 riffed on a quote from Martin Luther King. They wrote, “we’d prefer that the video and message from the participating Ferguson families and kids be judged on the content of its character and not the color of the skin of the director who pitched in to help make it.”

Popular vlogger and comedian Franchesca Ramsey (a.k.a. Chescaleigh, who is known for videos including **** White Girls Say To Black Girls), called FCKH8’s post “eye-roll inducing.”

“This is rich,” she wrote. “A FOR PROFIT COMPANY is accusing an anti-racism non-profit organization of race baiting for donations?! This from the company that has not once spoken about anti-racism until Ferguson (way genuine!), and their contribution is… T-shirts and a $5 donation.”

In an email to the Daily Dot, a representative from FCKH8 pointed out that their products had already raised $6,000 in one week, and that several other charities had contacted them for donations. They also emphasised that the organizations receiving donations from FCKH8 are not necessarily affiliated with FCKH8 itself.

“We specially made it a point in several places on the website to note that the organizations that we are choosing to donate to are not involved with our campaign. As understandably some of our vocal LGBT advocacy and youth-oriented name and attention-getting style are not how these great groups present themselves we wanted to be clear that is is just us supporting them good work and not the other way around.”

The issue of FCKH8’s “attention-getting style” has always been a source of conflict with the marginalized groups it attempts to represent. Both as a for-profit business and as a fundraising organization, FCKH8’s main goal is to promote itself and sell more products. Inevitably, this causes some friction with non-profit campaigners who demand a more nuanced discussion of race, gender and sexuality.
http://www.dailydot.com/business/fckh8-ferguson-t-shirt/

I'd rather send the cost of the T-shirt directly to whatever group I wanted to support--I don't need to turn my chest into "a little billboard" to help line FCKH8's pockets, or to support this kind of exploitive advertising.

chai2
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Oct, 2014 03:29 pm
@firefly,
Would you have felt better is they were selling T-shirts that said "I'm daddy's little Princess and get whatever I want"?

I fail to see what is wrong with a business making money, and giving 1/3 of the sale price to the cause.

People give shitloads (I said shitloads) of $$ to charities where a few cents on the dollar go to a cause.

http://www.marketplace.org/sites/default/files/charities-chart.jpg

33% of the sale price is pretty impressive, and God forbid a business make a profit.
chai2
 
  2  
Reply Fri 24 Oct, 2014 03:40 pm
@chai2,
Off subject, but my last post reminded me of when I was in my late 20's, and working as a recruiter for an employment agency. I had a really great candidate and was promoting him to a potential client. The potential client kept insisting I give the name and phone number to him, and I was more than ready to move on. He said before I rang off "So.....you won't give me the name of this person so I can call them, because you want me to pay you money for it."

Yes, that is correct.
0 Replies
 
One Eyed Mind
 
  -3  
Reply Fri 24 Oct, 2014 03:48 pm
@chai2,
You forgot the part where they are making a big deal out of something that doesn't exist on that exaggerated scale.

There is a problem with women abuse, but it's not even remotely close to what people are making out of it.

Every time the media is on your side, is when you need to turn the other cheek, or you will eventually get BOTH OF THEM SLAPPED BY REALITY REMINDING YOU OF YOUR GULLIBILITY AND FAILURE TO RECOGNIZE AGGRANDIZING AGENDAS.

When the people side with politics for false pretenses, it's the greatest evil imaginable.
Germlat
 
  2  
Reply Fri 24 Oct, 2014 06:50 pm
@One Eyed Mind,
What about the young girl's ability to process this complex situation. Does a girl of this age have the emotional maturity to even comprehend these issues.
Or able to discern this...or are they in need of a environment of security? Yes...over time one is able to discern these issues ...it's screwed up to expect young children to discern this, when as adults were still debating about it.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Fri 24 Oct, 2014 07:02 pm
@Germlat,
Quote:
Does a girl of this age have the emotional maturity to even comprehend these issues.

doesn't this remind you of how Bill Clinton would get up on stage and seek out advice from 7 year olds on how to end war,famine and general suffering? This is a particularly nasty side of our practice of fetishizing children.
One Eyed Mind
 
  0  
Reply Fri 24 Oct, 2014 07:08 pm
@Germlat,
There are problems out there,

but the media's idea of those problems,

Is ignoring the REAL PROBLEMS.

Hey, Germ.

Call me when the media stops focusing on a rich person's body, or what hairstyle they got, but sex rings, drug cartels and only the important stuff we SHOULD KNOW.

Until then, Go **** yourself for siding with these imbeciles who side with the devils of information.

So many years in your life, and you still cannot stop thinking for yourself. Pathetic. You are the reason why in every history book, the people come together FOR ALL THE WRONG REASONS. This is why tyrants and psychopaths always win - BECAUSE THE GOOD PEOPLE ALWAYS LOSE - BECAUSE THE IDIOTS ALWAYS WIN.

WARS. POLITICS. CONSPIRACY THEORISTS. HEADS OF RELIGIOUS PRACTICES. ALL SAMPLES OF PEOPLE'S FAILURE TO GET THE RIGHT PEOPLE IN POWER.

WHENCE COMETH PEOPLE FOLLOWING A GENIUS? N.E.V.E.R All geniuses, all those people that could have fixed EVERYTHING, you PUSHED AWAY FOR YOUR OWN SELFISH WORLD. Look in the mirror and be ashamed of yourself. Your ignorance/negligence is the belly of our despair. Have fun with that.
0 Replies
 
Germlat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Oct, 2014 07:10 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

Quote:
Does a girl of this age have the emotional maturity to even comprehend these issues.

doesn't this remind you of how Bill Clinton would get up on stage and seek out advice from 7 year olds on how to end war,famine and general suffering? This is a particularly nasty side of our practice of fetishizing children.
. If your talking political strategies , this has nothing to do with Clinton(not in my opinion anyway )...Feel free to share ....
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  7  
Reply Fri 24 Oct, 2014 07:33 pm
I think that video is appalling. You don't get a bunch of girls under the age of 10, have them use foul language and expect to be taken seriously about the message they babble along.
It's actually an insult to any woman!! We are a lot smarter than that and
we have legitimate arguments to fight our portion of equality.
One Eyed Mind
 
  0  
Reply Fri 24 Oct, 2014 07:39 pm
@CalamityJane,
I don't care if they use "foul" language, I like chickens.

I care about what they are saying - they are not saying anything.

If Einstein said "“Imagination is ******* more important than knowledge! Knowledge is damn limited. Imagination encircles the whole shitting world.”"

I wouldn't care.

If Einstein said "lyf sux dickz fuk lyf fuk ppl and fuk evry1".

I would care.
 

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