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Should marijuana be legal?

 
 
2tfx
 
Reply Thu 23 Jan, 2014 03:38 pm
Legalized marijuana would bring new revenue to the states and protect our public lands from illegal growers, There is no reason why weed can't be regulated like tobacco and alcohol
 
tsarstepan
 
  3  
Reply Thu 23 Jan, 2014 06:01 pm
@2tfx,
I wouldn't be surprised that marijuana would become nationally legalized far before gay marriage would. And I'm for legalizing both institutions.
0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Thu 23 Jan, 2014 06:14 pm
@2tfx,
2tfx wrote:

Legalized marijuana would bring new revenue to the states and protect our public lands from illegal growers, There is no reason why weed can't be regulated like tobacco and alcohol


Not only that but there is no rational good reason why cnabis should be illegal. It is far, far less addictive than tobacco and causes far fewer social problems than the use of alcohol. But, of course, the Cosa Nostra and other criminal syndicates that have any sway with law-makers will endeavor to fight legalization. It would dry up a cash cow.
0 Replies
 
MWal
 
  1  
Reply Fri 4 Jul, 2014 06:17 pm
The hemp can be used as a clean burning motor oil, clothing, and paper. If we grow marijuana we grow hemp too. It will be free Smile
0 Replies
 
bankruptcycenter
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Jul, 2014 12:35 am
i agree... moreover marijuana helps in treating a number of diseases as well.
0 Replies
 
Germlat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jul, 2014 03:11 pm
@2tfx,
I think it should be. Imagine the blow to organized crime. How completely idiotic to punish consumers..although, I think it causes many ailments...but not unlike tobacco or alcohol.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jul, 2014 03:16 pm
@Germlat,
A little late on the uptake; marijuana is already legal in many states.
Germlat
 
  2  
Reply Fri 25 Jul, 2014 03:52 pm
@cicerone imposter,
I do know that..but it's not the norm. Jails where I currently live are crowded with stupid kids simply experimenting....and getting to have it on their records for life. What a stupid waste of funds.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jul, 2014 03:57 pm
@Germlat,
That's another problem with marijuana; why jail these kids when the availability is rampant, and jails cost taxpayers money that doesn't need to be wasted.

The inconsistencies of the many states that legalize or make them illegal creates all kinds of mixed messages that's not necessary in today's world. Nothing has been learned from the prohibition years.

From Wiki.
Quote:
Prohibition in the United States was a nationwide Constitutional ban on the sale, production, importation, and transportation of alcoholic beverages that remained in place from 1920 to 1933. It was promoted by "dry" crusaders movement, led by rural Protestants and social Progressives in the Democratic and Republican parties, and was coordinated by the Anti-Saloon League. Prohibition was mandated under the Eighteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Enabling legislation, known as the Volstead Act, set down the rules for enforcing the ban and defined the types of alcoholic beverages that were prohibited. For example, religious uses of wine were allowed. Private ownership and consumption of alcohol was not made illegal under federal law; however, in many areas local laws were more strict, with some states banning possession outright. Nationwide Prohibition ended with the ratification of the Twenty-first Amendment, which repealed the Eighteenth Amendment, on December 5, 1933.


History only repeats itself.
Germlat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jul, 2014 04:09 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Yep...and by making it an illegal practice, we are supporting great carnage by the cartels. It also affects the politics of countries were the crops are raised and destabilizes those governments and the security/safety of the inhabitants. That's why the cartels keep moving. . I like you're analogy to prohibition. Same thing in a sense, but with stronger international consequences. I feel sorry for kids that live with charges on their records for life...limiting their avenues for progress. How idiotic!
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Fri 25 Jul, 2014 04:14 pm
@Germlat,
The idea that marijuana has the potential to ruin their lives because it becomes a 'criminal record' is outrageous on the face of it. There's no common sense or balance in these laws. It creates more problems than it solves.
Germlat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jul, 2014 04:21 pm
@cicerone imposter,
It criminalizes these kids for life...it can actually keep them from attaining professional licenses in the future?!!! Wow!
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jul, 2014 04:24 pm
I've read at length on this, never getting the illegality in the first place. I'm not all that interested for myself, pass me a good scotch (it's been years on that too, now I drink cheap stuff once in a while), but there are myriad complications with both illegality and legality.

The last place I lived in before sun flaming Albuqueque was Humboldt County. There are huge complications for forest care going on, major challenges from the sucking up of the already low creek waters to grow the greens.

I'm older now and I might like a plant in my house or backyard for brownie making respite if I get some nasty pain, but I've never yet read that mentioned as a concern to the article writers, re legality.

Add, if I do ever go there for one plant, I want the real thing. I know there are diverse choices.
Germlat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jul, 2014 04:31 pm
@ossobuco,
I've posted plenty on my concerns regarding the use of this drug. I'm not advocating it's use but it's criminalization.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jul, 2014 04:36 pm
@Germlat,
I missed that. Well, I saw one post on it, and that was one of the no's. There are also many positives, no link right this minute, but I might have saved it, a pros and cons article.



You're for its criminalization? Ok, I'll take your word for it.

Me, I think the illegality is killing our forests.
Germlat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jul, 2014 04:44 pm
@ossobuco,
No!! I'm not for it's criminalization. All you have to do is read the past two posts. I'm really not sure it's relevance to forest fires...I can't imagine it being more than cigarrettes are... Must read on that.
0 Replies
 
Debra Law
 
  2  
Reply Fri 25 Jul, 2014 06:57 pm
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:

History only repeats itself.


"The past is the key to the future."

"If we don't learn from our mistakes, we are doomed to repeat them."

Prohibition of alcohol did not work. It only spurred the creation of vast criminal syndicates that took advantage of the prohibition to make money by manufacturing and selling the prohibited substance. Prohibition led to murders, shoot-outs, turf wars, bribery, etc. The harm caused by prohibition was far worse than the alleged harm it sought to prevent (but did not prevent because people who wanted to drink alcohol still drank alcohol).

Today, our war on drugs is likewise causing far more problems than it seeks to prevent.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jul, 2014 07:28 pm
I'm not advocating it's use but it's criminalization.

Do you see why I am confused about your opinion?
Germlat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jul, 2014 07:35 pm
@ossobuco,
Well, can see how harmful it can be to users..but I can see that with alcohol abuse or abuse of other drugs and what it can result in...I still disagree with criminalization ...
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jul, 2014 09:57 pm
@Germlat,
So, we agree.
0 Replies
 
 

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