22
   

I am injured. Dammit.

 
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Feb, 2013 06:56 am
@Joe Nation,
I'm a Bostonian so you know how I pronounce it (awnt). I'm pleading comedic license.

(BTW, thanks for acknowledging)
0 Replies
 
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Feb, 2013 06:58 am
@Cycloptichorn,
Very, very interesting, Cycloptichorn and I think Matt is on to something when he says that "soylent' is something parallel to what is used in feeding tubes.

(He's picked a very bad name for his stuff, IMO, one, there is the connection to the book/movie and two, every soy grower/producer/seller is going to protest his use of the three letters S, O, Y,...unless there is soy in it. ****, now I have to go look at the ingredients and make a guess. )

I am going in search of Ceylon Cinnamon. I love stuff that tastes good.

Regarding my improvement or lack thereof, here is this morning's SkyWriting.


http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-oVrkhJiVrRU/USymdzmljEI/AAAAAAAAYKc/I13e8jnTsm8/s320/Voice+2-26-2013+6-42-12+AM.JPG

Joe(It's a sign of recovery when you notice that you are really good at tying ice packs on your leg, right?)Nation
MattDavis
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Feb, 2013 01:47 pm
@Joe Nation,
Hey Joe,
Jasmin and I are glad you are still hanging in there.
We just wanted to (recommend/suggest) for you to not do too much stretching, until you are not hurting so acutely. It is more difficult for the fibers of (muscle/tendon/fascia) to actually heal if they are more (frequently/deeply) pulled apart. It is tempting to stretch during this time because "it hurts so good", to do it....
But it's actually not good.
Please forgive the inelegant paragraph.
I (Matt) obviously wrote it.
Cycloptichorn
 
  2  
Reply Tue 26 Feb, 2013 02:07 pm
@roger,
roger wrote:

As long as they can walk away unharmed, I guess I'll continue to use it as needed.


I agree; it's the most effective way to keep ants out, as they sense the danger but don't get poisoned or harmed in any way.

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Feb, 2013 02:55 pm
@MattDavis,
Hello, JasMatt,


(wait, that doesn't sound right.)
MmmJas
(no)
J&M
(sounds like a hardware store)
ahem.... Hello, Jasmine and Matt...

You are SO right about the stretching and pain. One of the things which used to drive my ex a little crazier than she was were those new yoga students who had learned the 'no pain, no gain' tradition. (Do those people still exist?)

What I'm doing is very slow Feldenkrais movements. Monitoring the differences between one leg and the other. Feeling what changes there are in my back and hips.
The minicus is still sore, but improving each day, as long as I don't attempt any long walks (the trip from the MDs to the subway was a mistake.)

I figure I'm a week from being well and two months from a five mile run.

Joe(We'll see.)Nation
MattDavis
 
  2  
Reply Tue 26 Feb, 2013 03:52 pm
@Joe Nation,
Actually Jazmatt is the preferred term.

Not to be confused with yoga mat (for asana practice), or jazz mat (for jazzercising?).

We're totes trying for a Brangelina sorta thing.
roger
 
  3  
Reply Tue 26 Feb, 2013 03:54 pm
@MattDavis,
If you say so. Sounds too much like HAZMAT to me, but whatever.
MattDavis
 
  2  
Reply Tue 26 Feb, 2013 03:59 pm
@roger,
Roger wrote:
Sounds too much like HAZMAT to me, but whatever.
Well we are opposed to danger and work at protecting public health.

Don't even get me started as to what we are going to have to change our last names to when we get married. Rolling Eyes

We're leaning toward Vardavis.
This is already Munkin's last name. Munkin Vardavis the first.
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  2  
Reply Tue 26 Feb, 2013 04:22 pm
@Joe Nation,
If you do happen to pick up some true cinammon, let me know what you think. If you can't find any for some reason (which you ought to be able to as it's not really all that rare), let me know via PM and I can send you some.

Cheers
Cycloptichorn
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Feb, 2013 05:17 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
Thank you for the offer.
There's a really grocery (gourmet, their own designation) named Frank's. I'll try there first then go downtown to the Village.

Joe(If you can't get it in the Village, it doesn't exist)Nation
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 26 Feb, 2013 05:35 pm
@Joe Nation,
There's an amazing chain of stores (Penzeys Spices) that sell gourmet spices both in retail, brick-and-mortar as well as mail order. They started in Milwaukee WI but are now in 29 states, spreading like wildifre over the last 20 yrs.

They've all kinds of tasty imported cinnamon ("classic Korintje, rich Vietnamese, sweet China and delicious Ceylon") as well as every spice known to mankind.

Their website also lists some mighty fine recipes too.
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Feb, 2013 07:51 pm
@Ragman,
Vietnamese Cinnamon? I didn't even know that existed! Off to the spice store...

Cheers
Cycloptichorn
Joe Nation
 
  2  
Reply Wed 27 Feb, 2013 06:38 am
@Ragman,
I've heard of Penzey's...they had a store in Grand Central Terminal Market up until a few years ago.
That market is really tough place to be in business, so I am told by some people who say they know, you essentially make all of your sales between 4:45 and 6:57PM. Commuters heading out to Long Island and up into Connecticut who are usually not in the mood to browse or schmooze, they just want those six lamb chops or the pound of shrimp ASAP so they can catch their train. Wonderful cheeses, breads and other goodies......just know what you want when you walk in.

I looked them up. http://www.penzeys.com/

Joe(but you can't get a sandwich, for that you have to go downstairs)Nation

ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Feb, 2013 08:27 am
@Joe Nation,
I used to get Penzey's catalog, still have some of the cut out recipes (this before I became an online recipe zombie besides being a cookbook zombie). Still use their small pepper grinder nearly every day.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Feb, 2013 09:02 am
@ossobuco,
I just d/l their catalogue on my HD. However, recently on a downtown jaunt my dear friend MassCass/Quinn and I walked into the local Penzeys. Smelling all those cumins, curry and cinnamons speices in person I thought I died and went to heaven.

Today, I bought some fresh farm-raised salmon and I'm preparing a meal. I wonder how currants, tamarind or cinnamon would be in a sauce with this?...Hmmm
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 27 Feb, 2013 09:09 am
@Cycloptichorn,
FWIW, here's Penzeys article on Cinnamons:

There are two main types of cinnamon.

Cassia cinnamon is native to Southeast Asia,
especially southern China and northern
Vietnam, and has the strong, spicy-sweet
flavor most Americans are familiar with.
Vietnamese and China cinnamon are the
sweetest and strongest varieties, with
Korintje cinnamon having a smooth flavor
with less bite. Our cinnamon sticks and
Korintje cinnamon both come from the
southwest coast of Sumatra in Indonesia. It
grows wild on the government-protected
slopes of Mount Kerinci, where the
cinnamon gets its name. We stock the top
Korintje A grade, although there are also the
lower B and C grades, which are the types
of cinnamon usually sold in supermarkets
in the U.S. Our very sweet and strong
Vietnamese cinnamon comes from the
remote north and west regions of Vietnam.

The strength of the flavor of spices depends
upon the essential oil content —
the higher the level, the stronger the flavor. When
orders for cinnamon come in, the large
sticks are cracked into slightly smaller pieces
and packed into burlap bags for shipment.

The second type of cinnamon, Ceylon,
or "true" cinnamon, has a much different
flavor. It is less sweet, with a more complex,
citrus flavor. The special flavor of English
and Mexican sweets comes from Ceylon
cinnamon. We like to recommend Ceylon
Cinnamon for baking with fruit—especially
in apple pie.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Feb, 2013 09:24 am
@Ragman,
Sounds like you could substitute cardamon for Ceylon cinnamon. Don't know if it repels ants, though.
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Feb, 2013 10:26 am
@roger,
Nope, cardamom doesn't taste the same at all.

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
MattDavis
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Feb, 2013 06:31 pm
@Ragman,
Have you ever noticed a great difficulty in using verbal language to describe taste?
I wonder if this is true in all human languages?
Does this betray a disparity between our more primitive emotional (taste/smell) mind, and our more dualistic (logical/analytical/creative) mind?
I'm no expert in linguistics/psychology/or taste, but this seems like an interesting question.
Ragman
 
  3  
Reply Wed 27 Feb, 2013 06:37 pm
@MattDavis,
It's all a matter of taste, Bud!
 

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