17
   

Mayor Bloomberg proposes super-sized soda ban

 
 
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Sep, 2012 09:49 am
@aidan,
Quote:
And in terms of breast-feeding, I'm sure the nurses aren't standing there admonishing the mothers as much as trying to make sure they understand (and have not just heard in a vague and passing way somewhere) about what exactly the benefits of breastfeeding vs. formula ARE. And a new mother DOES have to breastfeed in the first few hours after birth because once a baby takes a bottle, it's much harder to get them on the breast than it is if they only know the breast from the beginning.

I agree with you. I think this is an educational effort, just as a nurse informs a patient regarding their discharge instructions when they leave a hospital, makes sure they understand them, and has them sign to acknowledge they have received those instructions. You can't just assume a patient already knows something, and you must be sure that the information they have is correct, and you have to be able to answer any questions they might have. And giving a patient such information about breast-feeding vs formula feeding is not tantamount to pressuring or admonishing. It helps the mother to make an informed decision. The choice still remains with the mother.

And clearly, the hospitals are trying to counter-act the promotion of baby formula that the manufacturers have been doing with their patients--such as giving new mothers swag bags, or diaper bags, filled with free samples of their products as free gifts to take home--and part of this program involves the hospitals now refusing to accept these promotional items, which serve to encourage formula feeding.

Large City hospitals have an obligation to promote public heath, protect public health, and to educate the public regarding public health--that's what their function is. And, in the case of this breast-feeding program that's exactly what they are doing, by making sure that the public is being given adequate medical information regarding breast-feeding, and medical advice that no one is disputing is beneficial advice. These large hospitals serve incredibly diverse patient populations, who may differ considerably in their level of understanding of medical information, and it's more important that patients be given good medical information and advice than a promotional goodie bag of formula freebies encouraging them to do something that's contrary to that good medical advice.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Sep, 2012 10:12 am
@firefly,
Yes we need to protect adult women from their own poor judgment in this matter and stop the give away of free formula for example to the poor stupid and weak will women along with locking away the hospital formula so every time a mother need or wish to feed their babies using a bottle they will need to wait under the floor nurse can go and unlock the formula supply.

Wonder if they would give the mother a hard time if she would bring her own damn formula to the hospital as I bet it get old waiting for the floor nurse to bring the hospital formula around.

No one had any problem at all with giving full support to women who wish to try to breastfeed the problem is when they interfere with a woman free choice in the matter.

Doing such fun things as needing to list a medical reason for the lady not breastfeeding on their charts!!!!!!!!!!

Not giving aid to women who wish to breastfeed is wrong but pressuring women who had decided not to breastfeed is also just as wrong.
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Sep, 2012 11:57 am
@BillRM,
Quote:
Of course not my dishonest friend and that is why they are bragging that since they had locked up the formula the breastfeeding rate had double.

This program only went into effect on September 3rd. Could you provide a link to justify and corroborate that statement?

And this initiative is not something that New York City dreamed up.
Quote:
Latch On NYC isn’t the only program of its kind. Though it’s run independently by the city, it coincides with a nationwide movement to get hospitals to do a better job of promoting breastfeeding. The National Initiative for Children’s Healthcare Quality’s CDC-funded Best Fed Beginnings campaign is one of several campaigns sharing that aim. And, internationally, the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative is working toward the same goal.

And individual states, recognizing that the American Academy of Pediatrics and other authoritative sources maintain that breastfeeding is best for both baby and mother, have instituted or are in the process of instituting breastfeeding-friendly hospital policies.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-checkup/post/latch-on-nyc-breastfeeding-campaign-draws-attention-but-is-hardly-unique/2012/08/13/57700cf4-e591-11e1-9739-eef99c5fb285_blog.html
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  4  
Reply Tue 25 Sep, 2012 12:15 pm
@BillRM,
Quote:

Doing such fun things as needing to list a medical reason for the lady not breastfeeding on their charts!!!!!!!!!!

Now it's quite clear that your remarks are largely based on your ignorance and failure to understand what you read.

Part of this program requires that nurses do not give formula to the babies unless there is a medical reason for doing so, or unless the mother requests it. So, in instances where the nurse gives the baby the formula, the nurse must document one of those two reasons that she/he did so. That's to stop nurses, or other staff, from casually saying to the mother, things like, "Do you want me to give the baby a bottle, that will be easier on you right now." The mother must now request that the nurse give the baby the bottle--the idea of giving the bottle must now come from the mother, not the nurse. They don't want the nurses pushing formula feeding.

The mother is not required to give any reason to justify her request for a bottle of baby formula, or her decision to bottle feed--nor does any reason for her request have to be documented.

You just don't understand what you are talking about.
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Sep, 2012 01:26 pm
@BillRM,
Quote:
Yes we need to protect adult women from their own poor judgment in this matter...

You are seriously misconstruing and distorting the Latch On NYC initiative when you claim it is aimed at restricting a woman's choices--it does not interfere with any woman's choice of how to feed her baby. Nor does it imply that it is "poor judgment" to bottle feed a baby--it is aimed at promoting behavior that is the best choice, for both mother and baby, in terms of the health of both of them. But, not all woman may wish to make that choice, or be able to make that choice, and it would be both wrong, and inappropiate, to imply these women have "poor judgment"--which is what you are doing. The Latch On NYC initiative is not saying it's "poor judgement" to bottle feed, it's just clearly saying that breast-feeding is the better option, and it's explaining to new mothers why that it is the case.

And limiting access to the formula to only nurses, and not to aides, insures that the formula is only given when the mother requests it, and not just casually dispensed by other than nursing staff. That will also provide for the tracking and distribution of the infant formula, which will then allow this data to be used to determine the effectiveness of this initiative.

And you are completely overlooking the fact that maternity wards have two catagories of patients--mothers and newborns--and promoting the optimal health of those newborns is a valid concern for hospital staff. And one way to do that is to make sure that all new mothers have the best possible medical information regarding optimal health care of their baby when it comes to decisions about breast-feeding vs bottle feeding--and that's what this program attempts to provide.

This initiative is part of an educational public health program that is being conducted both inside and outside of New York City hospitals.
Quote:
NEW YORK CITY HEALTH DEPARTMENT LAUNCHES “LATCH ON NYC” INITIATIVE TO SUPPORT BREASTFEEDING MOTHERS

Infants exclusively breastfed reduce risk of serious infection

New subway and hospital poster campaign illustrates benefits of breastfeeding

http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/images/pr2012/pr013-12-image.gif
May 9, 2012 – New York City Health Commissioner Thomas Farley today launched “Latch On NYC,” a new citywide initiative to support mothers who breastfeed their infants by asking city maternity hospitals to voluntarily sign on to support a mother’s choice to breastfeed and limit the promotion of infant formula in their facilities which can interfere with that decision.

Twelve private New York City hospitals have already made the commitment and all 11 public hospitals run by the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation also joined “Latch On NYC,” going beyond the significant steps they previously took to support breastfeeding when they banned formula from gift bags and promotional materials in 2007. Additionally, a new Health Department subway and hospital poster campaign showing the benefits of breast milk, such as reducing the risk of ear infections, diarrhea, and pneumonia, will launch next week.

Commissioner Farley made the announcement at Harlem Hospital, the city’s first Baby Friendly Hospital, where he was joined by New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation president Alan D. Aviles and other executives representing more than half of all maternity hospitals in New York City.

“Human breast milk is best for babies and mothers,” said Commissioner Farley. “When babies receive supplementary formula in the hospital or mothers receive promotional baby formula on hospital discharge it can impede the establishment of an adequate milk supply and can undermine women’s confidence in breastfeeding. With this initiative the New York City health community is joining together to support mothers who choose to breastfeed.”

"HHC has been banning formula from gift bags and promotional materials from our labor and delivery units since 2007,” said HHC President Alan D. Aviles. “We are proud to have been a leader in supporting and educating mothers on the benefits of breastfeeding. We are committed to doing all we can to improve the health of the littlest New Yorkers and encourage the use of mother’s milk for the 22,000 babies born in our hospitals each year."

“Mothers who choose to breastfeed their baby are making a healthy choice for their child and themselves,” said State Health Commissioner Nirav R. Shah. “We commend Dr. Farley and the City Health Department for launching this new initiative and partnering with health care facilities to encourage breastfeeding, beginning when a new mother is still in the hospital. Medical evidence shows that breastfeeding leads to better health outcomes and is a great way to protect the health of your child from day one.”

“Greater New York Hospital Association strongly supports the efforts of its member hospitals to assist and encourage breastfeeding to improve the health and long term well-being of newborns,” said Greater New York Hospital Association president Kenneth E. Raske.

Ninety percent (90%) of NYC mothers start breastfeeding. However, by the time the baby reaches two months, only 31% of NYC mothers are still exclusively breastfeeding. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of a baby’s life. Breastfed babies are much less likely than formula-fed babies to get ear, respiratory and gastrointestinal infections, and are also less likely to develop asthma. Breastfeeding is also beneficial to mothers -- women who breastfeed have a reduced risk of ovarian and breast cancers.

The promotion and marketing of infant formula often interferes with breastfeeding. Breastfeeding mothers report that receiving free formula at hospital discharge can make them feel like their breast milk is not enough to satisfy their babies. In NYC, the most common reasons women stop breastfeeding are due to concerns about milk supply; 47% of women report they stopped breastfeeding because they thought they weren’t producing enough milk and 44% because they thought the infant wasn’t satisfied with breast milk alone. These concerns, although common, are largely unfounded because most mothers do produce enough milk to meet their babies needs if they exclusively breastfeed. These concerns can be addressed while the mother is still in the hospital. However, without the support and education these mothers need, many of them turn to formula.

Beginning to breastfeed from the start is also important for planning a baby’s diet for the first year of life. If the baby is not given anything but breast milk, especially in the first month after the baby is born, almost every mother will make enough milk for her baby. Using baby formula during this time can decrease the production of milk, and consequently make the mother reliant on formula.

By joining this voluntary initiative for NYC maternity hospitals to support mother’s decision to breastfeed participating hospitals have agreed to:

Enforce the NYS hospital regulation to not supplement breastfeeding infants with formula feeding unless medically indicated and documented on the infant’s medical chart;

Restrict access to infant formula by hospital staff, tracking infant formula distribution and sharing data on formula distribution with the Health Department;

Discontinue the distribution of promotional or free infant formula; and
Prohibit the display and distribution of infant formula promotional materials in any hospital location.

“Latch On NYC” has been formally endorsed by the New York State Department of Health, Greater New York Hospital Association, Academy of Family Physicians, New York County Chapter, American Academy of Pediatrics, District II, New York State and the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine, New York State Chapter.
http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/pr2012/pr013-12.shtml

There is adequate reason for instituting this initiative while the new mother is still in the hospital:
“When babies receive supplementary formula in the hospital or mothers receive promotional baby formula on hospital discharge it can impede the establishment of an adequate milk supply and can undermine women’s confidence in breastfeeding."

It is more than a little crazy to argue that health departments and hospitals shouldn't do everything possible to protect the health of their patients, including the health of the patients that are mothers and newborn babies, but that's what you are doing. It's crazy to argue that hospitals, and their medical/nursing staffs, shouldn't do everything possible to help new mothers make the most optimal health choices for their newborns, but that's what you're arguing. It's crazy to argue that hospital staff shouldn't be educating their patients and advising them about optimal health choices, but that's what you're doing. It's crazy to argue that hospitals shouldn't be trying to encourage and support breast-feeding, as much as possible, and trying to discourage the promotion of formula feeding, but that's what you're arguing.

This initiative isn't about limiting a woman's right to choose how to feed her baby--it's about educating all new mothers on the optimal health care of their babies, and themselves, and then letting them make their own decisions.


0 Replies
 
aidan
 
  3  
Reply Tue 25 Sep, 2012 01:28 pm
@BillRM,
Quote:
So you are under the impression that the mothers are living in a cave somewhere without cable and therefore the benefits of breast feeding is a new idea to them?

Oh - so is cable free now? I don't know, I'm asking. I haven't lived in the US in 8 years so I don't know, but I do know that when I last lived there it wasn't free and a lot of people I knew didn't have cable or internet because they couldn't afford it.
Also, what if they happened to miss that particular cable tv show that particular night?


Quote:
That their own doctors had not also cover the issue in details long before the birth for that matter?

Umm, there are also a lot of women who don't have insurance and so don't get adequate pre-natal care.

Oh, but yeah - in your world all people are socioeconomically equal and middle classed and get exactly the same pre-natal care and information...yeah...okay - maybe that's so - if it is, things have sure changed since I last lived there... HURRAY!


URL: http://able2know.org/reply/post-5116658
aidan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Sep, 2012 01:34 pm
@BillRM,
Quote:
So you need a sonogram to prove that a woman is pregnant that is a new concept however it is a test force on the woman and her doctors by the state in the hope that she will not be emotionally strong enough afterward to go on with the procedure not for some proof of being pregnant and the hell who care what emotional harms it might do to the woman who did not wish for the test in the first place


I think the reason they might ask for a sonogram is to make sure the dates are correct - I don't think it really has anything to do with making the woman feel guilty for doing what she's doing, unless this is an initiative being put forward by Focus on the Family or something like that.
I mean, is it?
Give me a ******* break!
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  2  
Reply Tue 25 Sep, 2012 01:59 pm
@aidan,
Quote:
Umm, there are also a lot of women who don't have insurance and so don't get adequate pre-natal care.

That's particularly true when you are talking about women who are patients in NYC municipal hospitals because that group will include the most indigent, and least highly educated, people who reside in the city.

BillRM is ridiculous in his assumption that all women are middle-class, well educated, have cable, read books, etc. That's certainly not the case, and it's definitely not the case for most of the women who are patients in NYC's municipal hospitals.

Can you imagine why someone would be so anti-medical education, so anti-public health information, as BillRM is? I can't. It just doesn't make sense to me.

aidan
 
  2  
Reply Tue 25 Sep, 2012 02:09 pm
He probably just can't picture anyone living a different life than he does.
I think a lot of people are like that.
I didn't know how some women and children lived until I worked at a homeless shelter for pregnant women and their children.
Maybe Bill should do some volunteer work and learn a thing or two about how the other half lives.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Sep, 2012 02:13 pm
A very bright woman writer for the Atlantic Magazine had made the same points I had been making on this thread in the article below with special note concerning treating grown adults women as children/infants.

Of course Firefly always had shown an unwillingness to regards grown women as full adults on this website and without the need of the government to act as parents to them.

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2012/07/a-womans-right-to-choose-not-to-breastfeed/260530/


A Woman's Right to Choose (Not to Breastfeed)
By Gayle Tzemach Lemmon
inShare.2Jul 31 2012, 11:52 AM ET 373



New York City's new pro-breast milk policy stigmatizes infant formula and limits access to it, effectively revoking women's freedom to feed their babies as they choose.


Already leading one of the most aggressive "pro-breast milk" campaigns in the country, New York City has announced that it will now track usage of infant formula. In the latest salvo in the push to turn breastfeeding from a healthy option to a public mandate, hospitals will keep formula locked away, treating it more like contraband than basic infant sustenance.

Women who have heard the advantages of breastfeeding and have decided -- for whatever personal reason -- to feed their newborns formula, will now have to justify their reasoning before they are given access to it.

When, exactly, exercising a personal right about what to do for your child (and with your own body) became a public statement, open to the city's files and others' judgment, is unclear.

Women opt not to breastfeed for myriad reasons. Some cannot breastfeed because they must take anti-depressants or other medications that prevent healthy breastfeeding. Several women I know simply could not make breastfeeding work because a battering of infections and their body's inability to produce sufficient milk made it both painful and unworkable. Others insisted on breastfeeding, only to find that they could not give their baby enough milk to help them put on weight and grow.

Giving birth to a baby does not make you an infant. But that is not the point. Nor is the central issue the positives of breastfeeding. Indeed, women should receive all the education available in the least judgmental environment possible. Who could possibly oppose that? But once the discussion is done, women who decide breastfeeding does not work for them should be able to make their decision in peace and without prying. The real reason the Gotham policy is so objectionable is it infantilizes women by telling them they are no longer adult enough to decide for themselves what is best for their families and themselves. It is strange. Somehow we have reached a point where people who speak angrily of the "war on women" when it comes to family planning do not hesitate to exercise suffocation of choice when it comes to breastfeeding. Breastfeeding has gone from being an ideal option for new mothers to a mandatory prerequisite for "good" parenthood.

Women who do not breast feed, for whatever reason, all of them personal, now must confess it in whispers, even though infant formula is regulated by the Food and Drug Administration and meets "the nutritional needs of infants." They don't dare admit their decision out loud for fear of risking the disapproval of their peers and colleagues. Why these same peers and colleagues feel entitled to ask about such a personal family choice is, of course, quite another question. And it has to do with making breastfeeding a public mandate, not a personal family choice.

Just after I had a baby, a little more than a year ago, complete strangers would ask me about how I was finding the art of nursing. I admit I was taken aback. Why did I need to answer that question? And when did private decisions become a public curiosity?

A friend told me in sheepish tones recently that she "knows breast feeding is good," but that she finds it nearly impossible to do, and is ashamed that she is considering choosing formula for her baby so that she keeps on the weight. Another new mother I know said the nurses at the hospital made her feel "fear and anxiety and guilt" after she was told she had to supplement breast milk with formula because the baby needed more food than she could provide.

As the Surgeon General has noted, "the decision to breastfeed is a personal one, and a mother should not be made to feel guilty if she cannot or chooses not to breastfeed." Does anyone think that treating Infamil like a narcotic will reduce new mothers' "anxiety" and "guilt?" Weighing in on other women's most intimate decisions is now the norm and then some, because it is cloaked in the language of public policy. It seems that even those who are "pro-choice" on nearly every issue imaginable find their tolerance ends when it comes to choices they don't support. Or, as it now appears, many open-minded people are open-minded only until new mothers make a family decision with which they don't agree.

In addition to keeping infant formula safely secured behind deadbolts, 27 New York City hospitals now say they will eliminate "maternity swag" (complimentary infant formula and accessories) even after women have been told the advantages of breast feeding and decided against it.

Why should government officials -- who can easily afford formula -- stop women who can't afford it from receiving a few free samples? To eliminate what little positive difference may have been making in a miserable economy? To revoke any sense of support for that mother's decision? Women should make informed choices, absolutely, but if they decide against breastfeeding for whatever reason, why should they not save $20 by taking home a tin of Similac? This is not about the formula industry. This is about women's right to choose what is right for their family and themselves.

Giving birth to a baby does not make you an infant. And turning grown-ups into children who no longer have personal rights to exercise once they have received the education is hardly the right way to encourage healthy habits.

BillRM
 
  0  
Reply Tue 25 Sep, 2012 02:25 pm
@firefly,
Quote:
That's particularly true when you are talking about women who are patients in NYC municipal hospitals because that group will include the most indigent, and least highly educated, people who reside in the city.

BillRM is ridiculous in his assumption that all women are middle-class, well educated, have cable, read books, etc. That's certainly not the case, and it's definitely not the case for most of the women who are patients in NYC's municipal hospitals.


Firefly no matter how must contempt you might feel toward these women that are not of the middle class or above they are adults with full adult rights to make such decisions concerning themselves and their children without the government strong arming them.

Strange is it not that you can look down with so must disrespect towards others women that happen not to share your background and support the idea that their independents should be taken away from them by the government on the theory it is for their own good.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  0  
Reply Tue 25 Sep, 2012 02:32 pm
@aidan,
Quote:
He probably just can't picture anyone living a different life than he does.
I think a lot of people are like that.


I view all adults unless a court had rule otherwise in regard to some individual to all be able to govern their own lives and their children lives by default.

I find it amazing how elitists you two women happen to be to say the least.
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  2  
Reply Tue 25 Sep, 2012 02:57 pm
@BillRM,
Quote:
Of course Firefly always had shown an unwillingness to regards grown women as full adults on this website and without the need of the government to act as parents to them.

Knock off such childish nonsense. I certainly do regard women as full fledged adults, and I also see them as entited to the protection of laws, just as men are.

And they are full fledged adults who can, and do, make their own decisions on how to feed their babies. And nothing about the Latch On NYC initiative is going to change that.

The woman who wrote that article is also making the same erroneous, and ignorant, assumption that you are about this program.
Quote:
Women who have heard the advantages of breastfeeding and have decided -- for whatever personal reason -- to feed their newborns formula, will now have to justify their reasoning before they are given access to it.

When, exactly, exercising a personal right about what to do for your child (and with your own body) became a public statement, open to the city's files and others' judgment, is unclear.

I can find absolutely nothing in the description of this initiative to justify or support that statement. Nowhere does it require that the woman must justify her reasoning before being given access to the formula. The nurses must justify and document their reasons, if they are the ones to give the baby the formula, but the mother isn't required to give a reason for requesting a bottle, nor are the mother's reasons for such a request being documented. That statement, and assumption, in the article is incorrect--it is wrong.
Quote:
In addition to keeping infant formula safely secured behind deadbolts, 27 New York City hospitals now say they will eliminate "maternity swag" (complimentary infant formula and accessories) even after women have been told the advantages of breast feeding and decided against it.

Why should government officials -- who can easily afford formula -- stop women who can't afford it from receiving a few free samples? To eliminate what little positive difference may have been making in a miserable economy? To revoke any sense of support for that mother's decision? Women should make informed choices, absolutely, but if they decide against breastfeeding for whatever reason, why should they not save $20 by taking home a tin of Similac? This is not about the formula industry...

The author doesn't seem to realize that NYC municipal hospitals stopped giving out those promotional swag bags years ago--with no public furor about it. It's private hospitals that are now making that same move on a voluntary basis.

It is about the formula industry, and their attempts to establish brand loyalty as fast as possible, and their use of hospitals to promote their product, and their obvious self-interest in promoting formula feeding. And, given the fact that breast-feeding is the better health option, for both mother and baby, there is no reason for those hospitals, which are trying to promote breast-feeding, to go along with practices that can undermine their own aims, by helping formula manufacturers to hawk their products.

So, the author you are citing, to support your views, doesn't have her information about this program straight, and consequently she's drawing erroneous conclusions because the factual information she's basing those conclusions on is wrong.

There are a lot of myths about this program, and both you and that author are getting caught up in those myths.

Try relying on primary sources, and not secondary scources, for your information, if you are interested in getting accurate and correct information.



BillRM
 
  0  
Reply Tue 25 Sep, 2012 03:14 pm
@firefly,
Quote:
The nurses must justify and document their reasons, if they are the ones to give the baby the formula, but the mother isn't required to give a reason for requesting a bottle, nor are the mother's reasons for such a request being documented. That statement, and assumption, in the article is incorrect--it is wrong.


Come on with this silliness the nurses must document their reasons for giving the formula to the women but not the women who had asked the nurses for it in the first place!!!!!!!!

We pressures the nurses to have as few mothers feeding their babies by formula as possible on their wards and they in turn will pressure the women

Give me a break...........................I can just see the Monday Morning staff meeting nurse X your ward for the second week in a row have no bottle feeding mother wonderful however nurse Y you have three mothers doing so that we can not justify to the board of health for medical reasons.

This is making the hospital and me look very bad so you are just going to need to work harder to reduce the numbers of mothers bottle feeding in your ward.

The sad part is that not one person in the world would have a problem with this program it they would cut out the pressure on the women.
firefly
 
  2  
Reply Tue 25 Sep, 2012 03:19 pm
@BillRM,
Quote:
Latch on NYC Initiative – Myths & Facts

Myth: The city is requiring hospitals to put formula under lock and key.
Fact: Hospitals are not being required to keep formula under lock and key under the City’s voluntary initiative. Formula will be fully available to any mother who chooses to feed her baby with formula. What the program does is encourage hospitals to end what had long been common practice: putting promotional formula in a mother’s room, or in a baby’s bassinet or in a go-bag – even for breastfeeding mothers who had not requested it.

Myth: Mothers who want formula will have to convince a nurse to sign it out by giving a medical reason.
Fact: Mothers can and always will be able to simply ask for formula and receive it free of charge in the hospital – no medical necessity required, no written consent required.

Myth: Mothers requesting formula will be subject to a lecture from the nurse.
Fact: The City’s new initiative does not set a requirement that mothers asking for formula receive a lecture or mandated talk. For the last three years, New York State Law under the Breastfeeding Bill of Rights, has required that mothers simply be provided accurate information on the benefits of breastfeeding. This requirement has not changed under the City’s new initiative.

Myth: Latch on NYC is taking away and/or jeopardizing a woman’s right to choose how to feed her baby.
Fact: The initiative is designed to support mothers who decide to breastfeed. For those women, the program asks hospital staff to respect the mother’s wishes and refrain from supplementing her baby with formula (unless it becomes medically necessary or the mother changes her mind). It does not restrict the mother’s nursing options in any way – nor does it restrict access to formula for those who want it.

Myth: Formula will be forbidden in some fashion.
Fact: If a mother decides she wants to use formula (or a combination of formula and breastmilk), she will be supported in her decision and her baby will be given formula during the hospital stay. If a breastfeeding mother changes her mind or requests formula at any time, her baby will be given formula.

Myth: Positive benefits from breastfeeding are being overblown or aren’t true.
Fact: There is overwhelming evidence, supported by national and international health organizations, showing that breastfeeding produces better health outcomes for babies and mothers than formula. For mothers, breastfeeding reduces the risk of breast and ovarian cancers. Babies that are breastfed have a lower risk of ear, respiratory and gastrointestinal infections, as well as childhood asthma, than babies who are formula fed.
The American Academy of Pediatrics just published new guidance to pediatricians in February 2012, reaffirming the evidence that the health benefits of breastfeeding over formula are clear: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/129/3/e827.full.pdf+html

http://www.nyc.gov/html/om/pdf/2012/latch_myth_fact.pdf

0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 25 Sep, 2012 03:23 pm
@firefly,
Quote:
It's private hospitals that are now making that same move on a voluntary basis.


VOLUNTARY...........?

I will sell you the Brooklyn bridge cheap and it have great tolls cash flow.
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  2  
Reply Tue 25 Sep, 2012 03:49 pm
@BillRM,
Quote:
Come on with this silliness the nurses must document their reasons for giving the formula to the women but not the women who had asked the nurses for it in the first place!!!!!!!!

You're a monument to ignorance.

In this case you are ignorant of basic hospital procedures.

The nurses, as members of the medical staff, must document all patient care that they are required to do--and that care includes when they are the person who feeds the infant. In addition, this initiative requires that the nurse feed the infant for only two reasons--#1. Because the formula feeding is medically indicated or necessary and/or #2. Because the mother has requested that the nurse provide the formula feeding. So, in chart notes of her/his patient care, the nurse must document the fact that she/he fed the infant, along with one of those two reasons for doing so.

The mother is not required to give any reasons for requesting the baby formula--and it will always be provided to her if she wants to give it to her infant. She's not the one being asked to follow the hospital regulations, the nurse is, which is why the nurses must document their own actions--to show they have adhered to hospital regulations.
Quote:
We pressures the nurses to have as few mothers feeding their babies by formula as possible on their wards and they in turn will pressure the women

Who says the nurses are being pressured in any way? Can you document that? Or is this just another fantasy on your part?
In fact, if the nurses did exert pressure, it would defeat the main purpose of the program, which is to show that an educational program, and better support for breast-feeding, and having less promotional formula floating around the unit, leads to fewer requests for formula.
And, if nurses in City hospitals were being pressured in the way that you think, you'd hear them screaming loud and clear--municipal employees in NYC are not at all bashful about complaining, and they are protected and backed up by a strong and powerful union.

This is just more ignorance on your part.

Someone who's as ignorant as you are definitely shouldn't be as anti-education as you seem to be. This Latch On NYC is primarily an educational initiative.

And yes, private hospitals are signing onto this program on a voluntary basis--the NYC Health and Hospitals Corp. has no authority over private hospitals. Some private hospitals have been doing this sort of thing for some time, others have signed on more recently. That you dispute the voluntary nature of such participation only serves to reveal still more ignorance on your part.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Sep, 2012 05:42 pm
Oh by the way Firefly you do seems to be trying once more to have it both ways once more in claiming that the New York City Government is not doing what it is clearly doing IE pressuring women to breastfeed and on the other hand stating that you need to pressure the lower class that are found in those hospitals as they can not be depended on to know what is best for them and their children.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Sep, 2012 06:20 pm
http://www.parenting.com/article/the-breastfeeding-police

The Breastfeeding Police
By Laura Stanley
comments (5) related tags: Feeding--Baby, Baby
.Andrea Gideon dreads shopping for infant formula. "Haven't you even tried breastfeeding?" cashiers have chided. And once while perusing the store, with formula in her basket and her son nestled cozily in a sling, she encountered another mother whose baby was also in a sling -- at the breast. The two made eye contact, but instead of returning Gideon's smile, the woman said, "Don't you know you're feeding your baby artificial crap? It's going to make him sick!" Gideon left in tears. Her heartbreak over her inability to nurse was, for her, an aching wound. And this complete stranger had just ripped it wide open.

In Gideon's neighborhood, in Rockville, MD, "It seems that everybody breastfeeds," she says. This kind of progressiveness is rare in the United States: Despite all the attention about the merits of breast milk, less than 65 percent of new mothers nurse and just 16 percent continue through the first year, the amount of time recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Yet across the country, moms who don't nurse report that they're being made to feel guilty about it. There are overzealous breastfeeding proponents who feel it's their duty to question and chastise mothers they see bottle-feeding their babies. In Sherman, TX, Melissa Taplin was dumbstruck when someone told her she should forgo her thyroid medication (often safe for breastfeeding, but not in this case) for at least a year, since her child's health mattered more: "I have to take this drug, but many people made me second-guess myself." Joan Wallace,* who lives in Hoboken, NJ, winces as she recalls how, when she brought out her daughter's bottle at a wedding, some people abandoned her table in protest.

Of course, the breastfeeding movement has hardly become a witchhunt. Yet such insensitivity is common. The fact is, although the vast majority of new mothers are able to breastfeed, about 2 percent of all women can't produce enough milk, regardless of their physical or emotional condition. Others may lactate poorly because they're exhausted, anxious, or depressed, or weakened by postpartum surgery. Milk supply can plummet when a working mother finds it difficult to pump on the job. A previous breast-reduction surgery or lumpectomy can inhibit lactation.

Of course, the efforts of breastfeeding advocates have had a tremendous positive impact. This is well-known. What's less well-known, or widely discussed, is the negative effect of breastfeeding activism¿ -- the persecution of those who don't nurse their babies. Sometimes it's overt, sometimes subtle. And sometimes it's self-inflicted, in the form of guilt, self-doubt, even grief. Says Karen Erika, of Bend, OR, whose infant developed a severe allergic reaction to proteins in her milk from the food she ate: "When I was pregnant, I surrounded myself with women who were breastfeeding, and then I found myself in a different position. Every time I thought I could let go and move on, guilt hit me straight in the face." Erika's now on a highly restricted diet, and her 8-month-old daughter is back at the breast.

"I was overwhelmed with guilt at times," adds Margaret Monroe.* Despite a good latch, frequent feedings, aggressive pumping, and a supportive lactation consultant, Monroe, from the San Francisco Bay area, produced little milk. "I was terrified that I was hurting my baby," she says.

In recent years, dozens of studies have suggested the superiority of human milk over formula: Breastfed babies are at lower risk for SIDS, they're less likely to become overweight, and they're less likely to develop allergies, asthma, diabetes, ear infections, and certain life-threatening illnesses.

What's not so thoroughly reported is that some of the research has serious limitations. "They're the type of studies that CNN loves to quote and doctors love to hate," says Tom Jaksic, M.D., a leading expert on neonatal nutrition at Harvard Medical School, referring to those linking breastfeeding and disease prevention. And like most research, while the breastfeeding studies are significant, he explains, they're largely "population-based," meaning that babies who are nursed may have parents who are well nourished, well educated, and able to afford quality medical care. "We try to correct for these things statistically, but we can't completely," says Nancy Butte, Ph.D., of the Children's Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine, in Houston. Butte has been studying the chemical components of breast milk and formula for more than 20 years. Both she and Dr. Jaksic believe that if they could eliminate statistical variables, they would find that breastfed babies, taken as a group, are only slightly more resistant to illness than formula-fed ones. "It's hard to distinguish between a well-cared-for bottle-fed infant and one who's breastfed," says Butte.

Many nutrition experts agree, but few are eager to discuss their opinions openly -- because for all the advances made in formula, it lacks antibodies and its nutrients are less available than those in breast milk. "And even if formula were identical to breast milk, it would still be best for a baby to nurse, just for the contact with his mother," says Dr. Jaksic. Yet he is adamant that mothers who must bottle-feed their babies, for whatever reason, deserve reassurance: "It's a fallacy that in the first six months of life you're going to make or break it for your kid. Formula is safe and adequate for growth, no question."

"It's time we de-demonized formula," says Monroe, who has stopped feeling guilty. "Without it, my son would have starved to death."

Sometimes, the expert a new mother turns to for breastfeeding support is the most judgmental and discouraging of all. Four years ago, when Wallace had her first child by c-section, her doctor accidentally cut her into bladder, leaving her incontinent. Two days after being discharged from the hospital, Wallace's incision opened up; she was bedridden, weak, and frantic. After finding a new doctor and scheduling corrective surgery, she turned her attention to nursing, which wasn't going well. Her milk supply was low and her 6-day-old daughter was ravenous. When she called a La Leche League leader, she got a tongue-lashing. "I told the representative I'd had to give the baby some formula, and she yelled at me. She said, 'You can't do both. It really boils down to how committed you are.' I got no support, no 'I hope you feel better.' " (La Leche League says its policy is to support a mother's decision, and it trains its leaders to be sensitive.)

"After my daughter, who's six months old now, was hospitalized for dehydration, I still kept hearing, 'Hang in there. Don't cave in and give her a bottle,' " says Tracy LeGrand, a mother of two in Camden, NC. "They made it seem like anyone who's willing to stick out the rough times can do it. That attitude made me feel like a failure."

Laura Best-Macia, a lactation consultant with Wellcare, Inc., in New York (where Wallace ultimately found help), says, "Try not to take it personally. I know that's a tall order in the early postpartum period, when you're feeling so vulnerable." While the strident stance that some breastfeeding enthusiasts take may come across as mean-spirited, she understands why they take this position: "What we're seeing is a backlash to an environment that's been very hostile to breastfeeding." Sadly, the backlash has engendered insensitivity, the last thing a panicked mother needs when her newborn is in trouble.

Of course, there are many lactation consultants and lay counselors who are prepared to listen, including those associated with La Leche League. Women who are seeking a level-headed, sympathetic breastfeeding adviser should simply hang up on anyone who's insulting or unkind. "Avoid people who use terms like 'always' or 'never' " advises Best-Macia, and ask for references. "Clients will tell me, 'Had you insisted I continue breastfeeding, I would have stopped. But you only wanted to support me in whatever I did, and that gave me the strength I needed to persist.' "

Judy Hopkinson, a lactation physiologist who trains lactation consultants at the Children's Nutrition Research Center, suggests, "Before you sign on with anyone, ask, 'What do you do if someone doesn't want to breastfeed?' A refusal to acknowledge this as a valid choice is a bad sign."

The politics of breastfeeding in this country is, after all, more about mothering than about milk. And mothers, for some reason, have always been the most meddled-with, second-guessed people on earth. Just a few decades ago, doctors in this country would push breastfeeding women to use formula if their babies weren't gaining weight at an acceptable rate, and mothers who nursed outside the home were considered lewd. Now, a mom who gives a hungry infant a little formula is led to believe by some people she's poisoning him. When will the world learn to trust mothers? When will concerned strangers give women they don't know the benefit of the doubt? These are matters that society may tackle someday. In the meantime, moms soldier on, doing what they must -- the very best they can.

*Name has been changed

Laura Stanley is a former senior editor of Travel Holiday
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Sep, 2012 07:07 pm
@firefly,
Oh please.

What is the purpose of this law if not to expand the practice of breast-feeding?

I doubt that you would be as sanguine about a law that required health care providers to give a lecture to a woman who wants an abortion.

Women feel enough internalized pressure to breast-feed without having to endure a lecture from a Nurse who doesn't want to give her formula for no other reason that it means paperwork demands in an already hectic shift.

If the hospital makes it more difficult to exercise a choice that is already difficult, it is coercion.

If you are really a promoter of a woman's right to make choices about her body, then please stop trying to defend a law that very clearly is trying to make a specific choice difficult.

The fact that experts consider breast-feeding superior to the use of formula is meaningless, in terms of the mother exercising her choice. There are experts who will argue that an abortion is psychologically damaging for the mother but my bet is that you discount their opinions entirely.

Try to be consistent in your views and not fall into step behind every Progressive program.

This is just like feminists who gave Slick Willy a pass on his atrocious behavior with women. It's all about the politics and not the principle.

 

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