10
   

Okie knows farming

 
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Dec, 2010 07:00 pm
@parados,
Quote:
I know June is in the middle of summer.


Actually, most of June is in the Spring.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Dec, 2010 07:08 pm
@okie,
Quote:
He is a good example of how liberals reason and think, ...


You are way way way off the mark here, Okie.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Dec, 2010 07:12 pm
@farmerman,
Does the banked portion have a stone/concrete foundation behind it, Farmer?
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Dec, 2010 07:15 pm
@JTT,
JTT -

Buried in this piece is why I find it funny. See if you can spot it.
http://www.hobbyfarms.com/crops-and-gardening/making-hay-14902.aspx


Of course anyone that has ever put up hay will find it humorous that someone would think hay isn't put up until after the rain is over for the season.
parados
 
  2  
Reply Sat 4 Dec, 2010 07:16 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:

Quote:
I know June is in the middle of summer.


Actually, most of June is in the Spring.

June may be spring for you, but it isn't for farmers.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Dec, 2010 07:55 pm
@parados,
Quote:
Of course anyone that has ever put up hay will find it humorous that someone would think hay isn't put up until after the rain is over for the season.


Okie didn't say "after the rain is over for the season".

He said, "after much of the rain". I've put up hay and that is precisely what happens in many areas, though certainly not all.

I found it.

Quote:
Your best source of advice is a friendly neighbor who knows farm equipment and can help you get started the right way. Most farmers are happy to show new folks the ropes.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Dec, 2010 07:57 pm
@parados,
Farmers aren't the ones who decide when the four seasons start and stop.
0 Replies
 
Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Dec, 2010 08:00 pm
@parados,
It is on the northern prairies. We had snow on May 29 this year, it was very cold and many farmers couldn't get out on the fields for the longest time.
0 Replies
 
okie
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Dec, 2010 09:32 pm
@parados,
parados wrote:
Of course anyone that has ever put up hay will find it humorous that someone would think hay isn't put up until after the rain is over for the season.
What kind of a dimwit are you, parados? Good grief! I did not say hay was put up after the rain is over for the season, okay? This is what I said: "Yeah, I think its about 35 inches per year, but maybe the hay is not put up until later in the summer, after much of the rain."

Now I run onto this post from JTT:
Quote:
Okie, if you haven't figured it out by now. Parados has been using his world famous niggling on you. He rarely says anything concrete himself and he niggles away at what you say without ever actually addressing it.
I had to look up the definition of "niggle," and yes, JTT, I think you have a point. I have found parados to be much like a defense lawyer that will use any angle to try to defend the most ridiculous of his chosen liberal political agenda, to the point of the ridiculous. If you will actually notice some of the stuff he posts, some of it is utterly unbelievable, such as he milked cows twice a day from the time he was 7 years old until he was 16. If you believe that one, I have some swampland in Florida I have for sale that I am sure you could buy cheap, JTT. I suppose it might be possible he did that, but I doubt it is even remotely likely.

To make a long story short, I have had to conclude that parados is not well connected to reality or even honesty. In fact, I wonder if he considers his arguments here as nothing more than a recreational novelty to badger the conservatives that he holds in contempt, by virtue of his political beliefs, so that reality or honesty mean little to him at all. Sorry, parados, but I have no other explanation for your commonly bizarre and nitpicky posts.

JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Dec, 2010 11:40 pm
@okie,
Quote:
such as he milked cows twice a day from the time he was 7 years old until he was 16. If you believe that one, I have some swampland in Florida I have for sale that I am sure you could buy cheap, JTT.


I can't see why that would be implausible, Okie. He might be stretching it a bit, but it's hardly out of the question.

Quote:
In fact, I wonder if he considers his arguments here as nothing more than a recreational novelty to badger the conservatives that he holds in contempt, by virtue of his political beliefs, so that reality or honesty mean little to him at all.


There's no doubt that he does that, but he does raise some good arguments and he does argue well some of the time. I haven't done a study to check the frequency.

But he does have a bad habit of niggling on the most inane parts of the discussion. This thread is one fine example of that.
parados
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Dec, 2010 02:44 pm
@JTT,
No, you didn't find it JTT. It's near the bottom and it might help you figure out when hay is put up.
parados
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Dec, 2010 02:52 pm
@okie,
Quote:
"Yeah, I think its about 35 inches per year, but maybe the hay is not put up until later in the summer, after much of the rain."

Ah.. you want to niggle about how much of the rain is over. OK..
It doesn't matter much okie. Your statement is still funny as is whether you want to niggle it is mostly over or all over. There isn't much hay put up late in the season when there is little to no rain. It would result in extremely poor quality hay if you waited that long.

Do you know what a "cutting" is? (Hint to JTT)
0 Replies
 
okie
 
  0  
Reply Sun 5 Dec, 2010 07:51 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:
Quote:
such as he milked cows twice a day from the time he was 7 years old until he was 16. If you believe that one, I have some swampland in Florida I have for sale that I am sure you could buy cheap, JTT.
I can't see why that would be implausible, Okie. He might be stretching it a bit, but it's hardly out of the question.
When parados first made the claim of milking cows twice a day from the age of 7, I questioned him on it. I am going from memory but I think he made some argument that he helped milk the cows or something, such as wash the strainer, etc. I found that to be rather humorous, as nobody on our farm would have called rinsing the equipment as the same as "milking cows," but anyway I have concluded the guy is hopeless.
Quote:
Quote:
In fact, I wonder if he considers his arguments here as nothing more than a recreational novelty to badger the conservatives that he holds in contempt, by virtue of his political beliefs, so that reality or honesty mean little to him at all.
There's no doubt that he does that, but he does raise some good arguments and he does argue well some of the time. I haven't done a study to check the frequency.
But he does have a bad habit of niggling on the most inane parts of the discussion. This thread is one fine example of that.
I will also give parados high marks in being able to argue well, but that does not at all measure his honesty or intelligence, JTT, not in my opinion anyway. Ever since I joined this forum and started dealing with parados, I've gotten the distinct impression that he argues like a lawyer, and he uses any point, no matter how miniscule or credible, to further his particular political persuasion. I also get the feeling that he knows his points are nonsensical sometimes, but he uses them anyway, as sort of a recreational pastime for him to needle conservatives here. JTT, I noticed that you agreed with my statement that perhaps parados considers it a "recreational novelty to badger the conservatives that he holds in contempt." That tells me that my hunches may not be far off about parados, if even one of parados's fellow liberals agrees with my assessment.
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Sun 5 Dec, 2010 10:22 pm
@okie,
Quote:
When parados first made the claim of milking cows twice a day from the age of 7,


It's not important, Okie. Forget about it. You know that Parados can be a niggling little gnat so it's simple; just don't let yourself get caught in that trap.
0 Replies
 
Mitzy
 
  2  
Reply Mon 6 Dec, 2010 12:59 am
@parados,
Farmers can be monsters! Look how Mr. McGregor nearly killed Peter Rabbit!
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  2  
Reply Mon 6 Dec, 2010 08:41 am
@okie,
Quote:
I am going from memory but I think he made some argument that he helped milk the cows or something, such as wash the strainer,

What do you say to others when they misrepresent what you said?

Oh.. that's right you call for an apology and call them names.

If you can find where I mentioned washing a strainer let me know. Until then, you are your usual lying sack of ****.


Quote:
I will also give parados high marks in being able to argue well, but that does not at all measure his honesty or intelligence,

It's funny that you should question the honesty of others in the same post you lie about what I said. Ironic, isn't it okie.
parados
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Dec, 2010 08:52 am
@parados,
okie wrote:
Yeah, I think its about 35 inches per year, but maybe the hay is not put up until later in the summer, after much of the rain.

But let's talk about why this statement is funny okie.
You claim to have spent time baling hay. In fact I would say you probably argued you spent several summers doing that.

Yet you don't know that hay is cut and baled several times per season? It doesn't say much about your time on a farm okie. In Oklahoma, they probably get 5 or 6 cuttings per year. In the upper midwest we get about 3 or 4. First cutting is usually about June and then every 3-4 weeks after that depending on rain. Rain is REQUIRED for the hay to grow unless you are irrigating. Late in the season when the rain is less often the hay doesn't grow as fast and not at all if there isn't rain. That is why I found your statement funny okie. You don't seem to know that hay is cut several times and you don't seem to understand the relationship between rain and how hay grows.

I doubt you know how to test cut alfalfa to see if it is about the right moisture to bale. Yet anyone that has ever baled hay should be able to do that. It's one of the most important things when baling hay. Too wet and it will mold. Too dry and the nutritional value is cut way back.
okie
 
  0  
Reply Mon 6 Dec, 2010 11:31 am
@parados,
It is you that is wrong again, parados. First of all, you cannot assume more than one cutting of hay. If you knew as much as you claim, you would know that it depends upon what kind of hay you are raising. Sure, if you raise alfalfa, and or grass, perhaps a mix, which is common in areas with irrigation, such as Rocky Mountain states, you can have 2, 3, maybe even 4 cuttings in a season. We did not raise alfalfa however, or grass hay. We grazed the grass, but we raised mostly sudan hay, which we typically only cut once per year where we lived, and rarely sometimes twice. We were dryland farmers, without irrigation, which influenced that as well. A few farmers around had some alfalfa, but not that many. Some also had what was called "prairie grass," which they cut for hay. Here is a quote from a website about sudan, sorghums, etc.
http://foragesoftexas.tamu.edu/pdf/FORAGESorghum.pdf
"Sorghums used for forage are typically grouped as a) forage sorghum, b) sudangrass, and c) sorghum-sudan hybrids. Each of these
types has different growth characteristics that influence how they should be used. Even within a type, considerable differences can exist between varieties. Typically, forage sorghums are used for silage production or for a one cutting hay crop.


So when you assert that "In Oklahoma, they probably get 5 or 6 cuttings per year. In the upper midwest we get about 3 or 4," that shows you don't know what you are talking about, parados. First of all, its plain stupid to assert that they get 5 or 6 cuttings in Oklahoma, because as I have pointed out to you, it depends upon what you are growing for hay, plus where you farm in Oklahoma, plus whether you have irrigation or not. I know of no farmer around where we lived that got 5 or 6 cuttings per year, from anything. And regarding test cutting alfalfa to see if it is about the right moisture to bale, we did not raise alfalfa, parados, do you have that straight now? I remember my Dad and the farmer boss I worked for, both walking the windrows and picking up some of it to get the look and feel for moisture, to see if it was time to bale yet. Often, we would turn the windrows with the rake at least once, maybe more if it rained after we cut the hay.

I think you made a mistake if you thought you could start this thread for the purpose of trying to trip me up on some kind of detail, parados. In my opinion, you are only digging a deeper hole for yourself, and creating further doubt about your own actual farming experience. I would advise you that honesty from the very start is always a better way to go.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Mon 6 Dec, 2010 01:54 pm
@parados,
Yes, I did find it, Parados, but you really missed it. It blew by you at the speed of light.

Quote:
Your best source of advice is a friendly neighbor who knows farm equipment and can help you get started the right way. Most farmers are happy to show new folks the ropes.


The vast majority of farmers that I've met aren't niggling little twerps.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Dec, 2010 06:37 pm
@parados,
The only folks I know who get 5 cuttings a season are the alfalfa growers in Nevada. They use center pivot irrigation and bale at the 700 lb bale level. Their hay is fantastic and expensive. WE get 4 cuttings of grass and alfalfa if we are lucky and the rain isnt too much. In several years since 2000 weve had too dry years (in which we only got 2 cuttings) and ver wet years (in which we got 3 cuttings and one of those was just ****. When raine don, alfalfa leaches protein and it looks like dried tobacco. Its good for heifers and sheep (even though sheep are touchy about hay that is too "Stemmy")
Weve taken to growing birdsfoot trefoil which works well in lowerv fields near daylight areas to streams.
My one neighbor has always follwoed up soy beans witha planting of SUDAX (sudan grass hybrid). ALthough, you have to watch ant SUdan grass vecause if the frost hits iot, the Nitrogen/C converts to CYANIDE and you can kill the cattle.

I usually stay away from clover (too hot) and SUdan in late season (Too much chance for cyanogen forming).

We get about 44" rain and we are in zone 6
 

Related Topics

Obama '08? - Discussion by sozobe
Let's get rid of the Electoral College - Discussion by Robert Gentel
McCain's VP: - Discussion by Cycloptichorn
Food Stamp Turkeys - Discussion by H2O MAN
The 2008 Democrat Convention - Discussion by Lash
McCain is blowing his election chances. - Discussion by McGentrix
Snowdon is a dummy - Discussion by cicerone imposter
GAFFNEY: Whose side is Obama on? - Discussion by gungasnake
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Okie knows farming
  3. » Page 4
Copyright © 2022 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 01/21/2022 at 05:21:16