10
   

Okie knows farming

 
 
parados
 
Reply Mon 15 Nov, 2010 10:00 pm
This is just to move the discussion of farming out of the Obama thread.
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Nov, 2010 10:20 pm
I like the idea that you included humor as a topic.
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Nov, 2010 11:04 pm
the farmer and the cowboy should be friends.
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Nov, 2010 08:03 am
@parados,
So okie.. what kind of tractors did you have on the farm that you drove from morning to night?


We had an International H which had a front end loader on it most of the time. But was also the tractor the corn picker fit on since it had narrow wheels.

We also had the John Deere 4020. It looked a lot like this one and was the work horse for doing most of the field work. Cabs were still luxuries for tractors back then.


edit - image too large.. I'll find another one

This one is better but the tractor was never this clean -
But you can just see the hydraulics peeking out behind the back wheels.
http://www.farmcollector.com/uploadedImages/FCM/articles/issues/2010-01-01/FC-JA10-firsthand-jd-restoration-02.jpg
okie
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Nov, 2010 10:49 am
@parados,
parados wrote:

So okie.. what kind of tractors did you have on the farm that you drove from morning to night?
We only had a Ford 8 or 9N when I was very young, so that is what I learned on. We had about 4 small acreage fields that we grew hay or wheat on, that I cut my teeth on with that tractor. Later, we had a Case 900, then a Case 930. The farmer I worked for always had Case as well, starting with an LA I think, which my brother drove most of the time. About the time I started working for him, he had a Case 930, then a later model of the 930, called a Comfort King.
Quote:
We had an International H which had a front end loader on it most of the time. But was also the tractor the corn picker fit on since it had narrow wheels.
We also had the John Deere 4020. It looked a lot like this one and was the work horse for doing most of the field work. Cabs were still luxuries for tractors back then.
The very first farmer I worked for away from home, only for a few days, he also had what I think was an International H, but not row crop type with narrow wheels. We did not have much if any row cropping in our area.
The brother of the farmer that I worked for that had Cases, he always had Deeres, one he had was a 4020 I believe as well.
parados
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Nov, 2010 10:58 am
@okie,
With no row crops, what were you doing running a cultivator?
0 Replies
 
H2O MAN
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 16 Nov, 2010 10:59 am
My favorite farm tractor was the old Massey Ferguson I spent many, many hours on when I lived in Indiana.
0 Replies
 
okie
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Nov, 2010 11:11 am
For those that are wondering what is going on here, parados created this thread, I believe to try to discredit me (okie), by somehow trying to build a case that he is now the expert on farming, and that as he puts it, I (okie) "spent a couple of weeks on the farm when I was a teenager," even though I grew up on a farm in Oklahoma.

parados now claims that he grew up on a farm in Eastern South Dakota, and that he milked cows twice a day from the age of 7 to the age of 16, and that nobody, thats "nobody," builds a cowbarn with a hayloft in it anymore. He also claims that by 12 years old in South Dakota, kids were driving on public roads with tractors and grain trucks, and by 14, every farm kid had drivers licenses to do it. He also claims that he and his brother were baling hay by the time they were 9 and 10 years old, one driving the tractor and the other stacking bales. He also claims his baler was an IH square baler. I wonder how heavy those bales were that either his brother or he were stacking at 9 or 10 years old? Do you remember, parados? He also claims that when I, along with all the other wheat farmers in Oklahoma, we were simply wasting gas when we were plowing, cultivating, and springtoothing the fields during the summer, so he implies I know nothing about farming. Apparently he thinks that work was unnecessary or something?



parados
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Nov, 2010 11:15 am
okie wrote:

parados wrote:
I wonder how hot it really got when you were plowing, drilling, springtoothing okie. You certainly wouldn't be doing that in the middle of summer. If you planted wheat and were driving from morning to night in the middle of June, you weren't doing much more than wasting gas okie.
That was in the middle of the summer. If you raised wheat, you would know that. You make many claims here, parados, about haylofts, milking cows from the age of 7, now this among other things.
You would also know, I hope, that farming methods have changed somewhat, with some farmers going to something called "no till."


I know June is in the middle of summer. You were talking about not having air conditioning on your tractor. That's June July and August for the hot months What time of the year did you plant wheat? It certainly wasn't any of those months.
okie
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Nov, 2010 11:23 am
@parados,
parados wrote:
I know June is in the middle of summer. You were talking about not having air conditioning on your tractor. That's June July and August for the hot months What time of the year did you plant wheat? It certainly wasn't any of those months.
We had no air conditioners on tractors. Yes, we did field work with tractors and implements when it was in the 90's, high 90's, or even past 100. We got used to it. Nor did our house have air conditioning. Our cars didn't either. We were not wealthy, parados.

We planted wheat toward fall, usually September. I don't remember for sure, it might have sometimes not gotten done until early October, but I think it was almost always done by the end of September. Of course, the weather would impact the schedule, depending upon the event of heavy rains, etc.
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Nov, 2010 11:30 am
@okie,
Quote:
He also claims that by 12 years old in South Dakota, kids were driving on public roads with tractors and grain trucks, and by 14, every farm kid had drivers licenses to do it.

The license age is still 14 in SD.
http://dps.sd.gov/licensing/driver_licensing/basic_licensing_info.aspx
Quote:
Who cannot get a South Dakota driver license?

* Persons under 14 years of age.
* Persons whose driver license or driving privileges are under suspension or revocation in South Dakota or any other state.



At 12 we weren't supposed to drive on roads but in driving from the field to storage it was often done for the 1/2 mile or so to get there.
okie
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Nov, 2010 12:07 pm
@parados,
I believe that is only for a beginners license or restricted Minor's permit, parados, which then converts to a full drivers license or "Operators Permit" at age 18. Restrictions for a Minors permit include a licensed driver's permission, plus their presence in the vehicle from 10 at night until 6 in the morning.
http://dps.sd.gov/licensing/driver_licensing/basic_licensing_info.aspx#types

I believe we were able to get a beginners license at age 15 or 15 1/2 in Oklahoma during the 60's. We may have used a permit to haul grain to the elevator, but given the increased legalities of today's world vs yesterday's, I would imagine one's insurance company might also have much to say about who should be driving and at what age as well.
parados
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Nov, 2010 12:25 pm
@okie,
Present day restrictions don't apply to 30 years ago okie. I would think you understood that since you just mentioned farming has changed over that time period. So have driving laws and insurance company requirements.
0 Replies
 
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Nov, 2010 12:28 pm
@okie,
just a suggestion Okie but if you ended every statement you make with "but I could be wrong" you might possibly increase your credibility.
H2O MAN
 
  -2  
Reply Tue 16 Nov, 2010 12:30 pm
@dyslexia,
Of course dyslexia could be wrong about that.
0 Replies
 
okie
 
  0  
Reply Tue 16 Nov, 2010 12:38 pm
@dyslexia,
dyslexia wrote:

just a suggestion Okie but if you ended every statement you make with "but I could be wrong" you might possibly increase your credibility.
Similarly, parados might increase his credibility if he ended many of his statements with "but I could be wrong." I would recommend he add that phrase to his claim that no cowbarns are now built with haylofts, that he milked cows twice a day from the age of 7 to 16, and that he and his brother were baling and stacking hay bales at the age of 9 and 10. I could be wrong, but I think that might make his claims more believable. What do you think, dys?
H2O MAN
 
  0  
Reply Tue 16 Nov, 2010 12:40 pm
http://www.mileanhour.com/files/2010/5/the-farmers-daughter-the-farmer-s-daughter-demotivational-poster-1274589090.jpg


I bet parakeet knows everything there is to know
about the tractor and what's attached to the PTO.
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Nov, 2010 02:00 pm
@okie,
Quote:
He also claims that he and his brother were baling hay by the time they were 9 and 10 years old, one driving the tractor and the other stacking bales. He also claims his baler was an IH square baler. I wonder how heavy those bales were that either his brother or he were stacking at 9 or 10 years old?

Hay bales weigh about 40-75 lbs depending on how tight they are and the moisture in the alfalfa. You can get 100 lb bales but if you do the hay is too wet and shouldn't be put up. At 9, we weren't throwing them over our heads but stacking them chest high wasn't that difficult. It's possible to stack hay and never actually lift a bale off the ground more than a few inches. Layer 1 you just drag into place. Layer 2, you just let the bale come out on end and then roll it end for end to get it on top of layer 1. Layer 3 is just a variation on layer 2. You just need one bale as a step to get to layer 3.

If 10 year olds can tackle each other on the football field, why do you think they can't lift hay bales lighter than them?
parados
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Nov, 2010 02:14 pm
@okie,
Quote:
I would recommend he add that phrase to his claim that no cowbarns are now built with haylofts,

When you find evidence of a cow barn built for a working farm in the last 20 years with a hay loft, let me know and I will admit I was wrong.

I tell you what okie. I'll even give you 10-1 odds and put up $500 that in the next month you can't provide evidence of such a barn.

1. It must be a farm that produces milk or beef for profit.
2. The barn must be used for cattle in the process of making that profit.
3. The barn must be built within the last 20 years.
4. The barn has to have an actual second story and not just some boards placed on the rafters to create storage.
okie
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Nov, 2010 04:37 pm
@parados,
parados wrote:

Quote:
He also claims that he and his brother were baling hay by the time they were 9 and 10 years old, one driving the tractor and the other stacking bales. He also claims his baler was an IH square baler. I wonder how heavy those bales were that either his brother or he were stacking at 9 or 10 years old?
Hay bales weigh about 40-75 lbs depending on how tight they are and the moisture in the alfalfa. You can get 100 lb bales but if you do the hay is too wet and shouldn't be put up.
We used to stack lots of 100 pound bales. In fact, a 40 lb. bale would be awfully light I think. Actually, we never weighed every bale, did you parados? How do you know? I merely took the word of adults as to how much they were likely weighing, and when they said they were 75 to 100 pound bales, they were probably not far off. Plus it depended upon if they were bound with wire or twine, as I think wire could bind a heavier bale?
Quote:
At 9, we weren't throwing them over our heads but stacking them chest high wasn't that difficult. It's possible to stack hay and never actually lift a bale off the ground more than a few inches. Layer 1 you just drag into place. Layer 2, you just let the bale come out on end and then roll it end for end to get it on top of layer 1. Layer 3 is just a variation on layer 2. You just need one bale as a step to get to layer 3.
If 10 year olds can tackle each other on the football field, why do you think they can't lift hay bales lighter than them?

I won't call you a liar, but suffice it to say I never saw any 8 or 9 year olds stacking hay, and in fact I doubt it would not be prudent for the parents to allow it. Face it, their bodies and bones would probably not be strong enough to do it without risk of injury I might have toyed around with a bale or two at 8 or 9, but I was about 12 or so before I did anything serious with it. More like 14 or 16 before I actually stacked much hay, I think. I think I was about the 8th grade, which would have made me about 14 when I started serious farm work. Prior to that, it was more like getting the cows in, feeding the chickens or cows, and fetching tools for my dad. My brother did much of the cow milking, which he started about the age of 12 or 13.

As I said, I am not accusing you of lying, but I am skeptical or dubious of your claims, and rightfully so I believe.
 

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