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Need Latin expert for quick translation

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Aug, 2014 11:50 am
@George,
Hah, I guessed correctly (50 years since I studied latin) re Moebius' question.
Apparently all is not lost yet.

Welcome to a2k, Moebius and Warren Gaebel.
WarrenGaebel
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Aug, 2014 11:54 am
@George,
That's what I thought, too, but when I put that into translate.google.com, it says, "It inspires confidence, competence" if I enter it in lowercase, "Powers inspires confidence" if I capitalize each word, and "MEETING inspire confidence" if I enter it as all caps. I get the same results in stars21.com. I haven't found any translator that gives me "Competence Inspires Confidence," which is the reason for my post. I thought it was right, but all the online tools disagree with me.
0 Replies
 
kere88
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Aug, 2014 12:52 pm
I also need a Latin translation. Can someone translate "my father's house consumes me"? Father being God the father. Thanks!!
George
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Aug, 2014 01:35 pm
@kere88,
domus patris mei comedit me

There is also this (John 2:16)
zelus domus tuae comedit me
The zeal of thy house hath eaten me up
0 Replies
 
LionTamerX
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Aug, 2014 06:24 pm
I have another Latin query. Sir Christopher Wren's epitaph famously reads " Si Monumentum Requiris, Circumspice." Commonly translated "If you seek his monument, look around you."
I'd like to alter this slightly, to read "If you seek my temple, look around you."
Would it be something like "Si templum requiris, circumspice ?"
George
 
  2  
Reply Mon 25 Aug, 2014 07:03 pm
@LionTamerX,
Yes. You could say templum meum if you wanted to be explicit about "my"
temple.
LionTamerX
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Aug, 2014 07:46 pm
@George,
Splendid ! Thank you !
George
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Aug, 2014 05:53 am
@LionTamerX,
You're welcome.
0 Replies
 
maribocorny
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Aug, 2014 07:32 pm
Hey. Sorry to bother, but I'm trying to translate the phrase "the world is quiet here". It's both from a book, where it is a motto, and from a poem about Proserpine, Hades' wife and goddess of death.

The poem starts like this:
Here, where the world is quiet / here, where all trouble seems / dead winds' and spent waves' riot in doubtful dreams of dreams / I watch the green field growing / for reaping folk and sowing, / for harvest-time and mowing, / a sleepy world of streams.

And go on (here is all of it: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/174555).

I searched on line and talked to a few people about it, and I got "mundus quietem hic", and "ecce orbis tacet", but no one was sure.

Can you help me?
George
 
  2  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2014 06:52 am
@maribocorny,
The first translation is almost there. Unfortunately quietem, which must
agree in case with mundus, does not. Substitute quies.

mundus quies hic

mundus --> world
quies --> quiet
hic --> here
("is" is understood)


The second translation is less literal, but still conveys the meaning.

"Behold, the world is silent"

ecce --> behold
orbis --> the world
tacet --> is silent
maribocorny
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2014 08:55 am
@George,
Thank you so much, George. Smile And thanks also for being so quick. Smile Smile
George
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2014 12:08 pm
@maribocorny,
My pleasure, maribocorny.
hernan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 1 Oct, 2014 10:52 am
@George,
You seem to be an incredibly helpful man George. I had a bad time recently and want to mark it with my first tattoo in Latin but I have so many different translations of what I want to say and I would rather it be completely accurate in Latin rather than a direct translation that loses its meaning if you follow my reasoning.

The phrase is "remember to be better than before" or "remember to be better than this"

Any help would be much appreciated. Thank you.
George
 
  2  
Reply Wed 1 Oct, 2014 12:12 pm
@hernan,
"remember to be better than before"

memento esse melius quam ante

Please read this.
0 Replies
 
Moebius
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Oct, 2014 04:01 pm
@ossobuco,
>>>Welcome to a2k, Moebius and Warren Gaebel.

Thanks, ossobuco!
____________________
So I'm writing a short-fiction shameless rip-off of Arthur Conan Doyle style stories about a murder mystery set in one of the historical secretive Hellfire Clubs (don't judge me Embarrassed )

The story will contain two invented Latin phrases, one written and the other as dialogue.

I need a Latin inscription for the Club entrance. I'm thinking Pleasure forever imminent. My best guess is Voluptas imminere perpetua...with the verb in the infinitive.

I'm wondering how to say May pleasure be forever imminent but I can't seem to figure out how to say May x be y in Latin since I'm not sure what a blessing is grammatically. But I think that would make a better motto.

The other latin phrase is Follow the carrot to the stick as a joke on the old detective's adage to follow the money to the source. My best guess is Sequere (active present imperative) carota (nominative case) ad virga.

Any thoughts are mucho appreciated Very Happy
George
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Oct, 2014 06:52 am
@Moebius,
Here are my suggestions:

Pleasure forever imminent
Voluptas in perpetuum imminens

May pleasure be forever imminent
Voluptas in perpetuum immineat

Follow the carrot to the stick
Sequere carotam ad virgam
Moebius
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Oct, 2014 03:55 pm
@George,
Ah, blessings are subjunctive! That makes sense.

I totally forgot the accusative case marks the object of a verb.

Thanks, George. You've made another of my awful short stories possible. The writing might be horrendous, but the Latin grammar will be impeccable Smile
George
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Oct, 2014 03:58 pm
@Moebius,
Glad to help, Moebius.
Where can we find your stories?

You have some understanding of Latin, I see.
When did you study it?
Agguel
 
  1  
Reply Wed 15 Oct, 2014 11:29 am
Hi

Could you help me?


I wonder if I got the correct translation;

Emanuel of Skåne
=
Emmanuhel de Scaniae


Skåne is a Swedish name of the region in the south..

Is it correct?


Thanks!
George
 
  2  
Reply Wed 15 Oct, 2014 11:37 am
@Agguel,
I believe it should be de Scania, not de Scaniae, but otherwise OK.
0 Replies
 
 

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