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Need Latin expert for quick translation

 
 
Moebius
 
  1  
Reply Sat 18 Oct, 2014 11:55 am
@George,
>Where can we find your stories?

I plan to try getting my first novel published next year. I've actually written five novels and numerous short fiction works over the last twenty years. But up until last year I always wrote for my own unwinding and a few friends. They've encouraged me to try publishing, so I created a novel concept specifically to test the waters, a surrealist spy novel set in Nazi Berlin. It's still in the outline and notes stage, thought the writing always goes quicker.

Depending on how that develops, I may try selling my idea for a multi-media novel - basically a PDF with scene illustrations and cued electronic compositions (another hobby of mine) or I may go the Kickstarter route a few writers have recently blazed. I can code, but I may have to hire an illustrator unless I can teach myself to draw.

I'm remembering the people who ask, so I'll let you know when I get something to market.

>You have some understanding of Latin, I see.

It's more that I have an interest in linguistics and Latin is at the root of so many of the world's most widely spoken languages. I did take some French in college, which, as you know, can be traced directly back to Latin. But that was many moons ago. There's also a lot of Latin in science, though less in physics than biology or chemistry. I think in a different life I might have opted to be a cognitive linguist.
0 Replies
 
George
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Oct, 2014 04:22 pm
Fascinating!
Hope to see you print.
0 Replies
 
JakeC
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Dec, 2014 05:47 am
@George
I'm looking to translate "Give to God" as I am getting a tattoo when I turn eighteen. Looking around I've found multiple different phrases, which another expert I asked said they are all incorrect. The expert herself refused to answer my question as she dislikes tattoos. Can you help?
George
 
  2  
Reply Fri 5 Dec, 2014 06:44 am
@JakeC,
Da Deo

Da -> Give
Deo -> to God
bdself
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Apr, 2015 02:25 pm
@George,
Hello,

Can you please tell me if SECOR DEUM is a correct/appropriate phrase for "Pursue God"

From what I can gather, SECOR has several meanings to include follow or pursue.

In addition, DEUM means God in the tense of (him).

Please clarify if SECOR DEUM would be or could be read as "Pursue God".

Thanks in advance,
George
 
  2  
Reply Fri 10 Apr, 2015 04:07 pm
@bdself,
I'm not familiar with "secor".
There is a Latin word sequor which means "I follow".
0 Replies
 
NancyG
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Aug, 2015 08:24 am
@George

Can you tell me the English translation for "Mira Mirari"? Also, would it have a different meaning if reversed "Mirari Mira"?
George
 
  2  
Reply Fri 14 Aug, 2015 07:30 am
@NancyG,
Mira Mirari
"To wonder (be astonished, marvel) at marvels (wonders)"

I have included alternate translations of those words in parentheses.

It would have the same meaning if reversed. Word order is less important
in Latin than in English.
0 Replies
 
RogueActual
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Aug, 2015 02:34 am
@George

You seem to be the go to man on this forum so I hope you don't mind my jumping straight to asking you this,

I am working on trying to figure out the best words to use and I have hit a wall. I am getting (big surprise) a few more tattoos soon and want it all the be right. The concept is simple, sine metv across my chest with a translation for "in war" on my right arm (already has tattoos from my time in combat), and "in love" on my left arm (tattoos for my wife). So all together it is simply without fear in love and in war. The prepositions are really messing me up. And the word choice for both war and love. Bello/bellvm etc. Any guidance would be greatly appreciated sir.
George
 
  2  
Reply Sat 15 Aug, 2015 07:19 am
@RogueActual,
without fear
sine metu (motto of the Jameson family -- it appears on every bottle of their whiskey)

in love
in amore (You probably already knew that)

in war
in bello
0 Replies
 
selectmytutor
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 9 Sep, 2015 06:02 am
@EGC,
Hi EGC,
"vox rationis"
0 Replies
 
selectmytutor
 
  0  
Reply Fri 25 Sep, 2015 06:52 am
@EGC,
vox ratio
0 Replies
 
milopilo
 
  1  
Reply Sun 11 Oct, 2015 09:33 am
Hi There!

Is it possible to translate the words 'keep your head up, keep your heart strong' In to Latin, I realise that the meaning of the phrase in English might not come across particularly well, but if anyone can help I would be very grateful !

Thank you!
George
 
  2  
Reply Mon 12 Oct, 2015 08:50 am
@milopilo,
tene caput erectum, tene cor forte
0 Replies
 
Moebius
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Jan, 2016 07:02 pm
So the writing continues. I've come to another point where I plan to use fictional Latin expressions. Specifically I have a character who reluctantly leads a group of monks dedicated to a life of contemplating philosophy and studying science into war against a despotic king who uses a perverted interpretation of a fictional religion to oppress his subjects.

The monks forge a sword and present it to their reluctant leader to remind him why he can't be neutral. On on side the sword says:

"No Blade Sharper Than The Truth"

I believe the phrase should begin "Nullum Ferrum Acrius (No Blade Sharper). And I know truth is "Veritas". My question is: Is the comparative of sharp (acer) is enough, or if there is some Latin conjection that should go between Acrius and Veritas?

The other side of the sword says:

"Ultima Ratio Contra Regum"

Some might recognize this as a variation on Ultima Ratio Regum (Last Argument of Kings) which Louis XIV had engraved on his cannons. Basically I'm turning it around to be "Last Argument Against Kings". My question here is: Would it make more sense to use Contra, per the above example, or is Adversus more suitable to the context?

Thanks in advance any suggestions!

Regards,
Moebius
George
 
  4  
Reply Mon 25 Jan, 2016 09:19 am
@Moebius,
Insert quam before veritas.

Contra is appropriate.
Change regum to reges because contra takes the accusative.
Moebius
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Jan, 2016 03:45 pm
@George,
Thanks! I thought the conjunction might be quam, but I wasn't sure if it was needed.
0 Replies
 
JamesJamesBoBames
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Aug, 2016 08:07 am
@George,
Hi George,

Would you be able to translate this Rudyard Kipling phrase into Latin, for my classroom wall?

"If you can meet with triumph and disaster and treat those two impostors just the same"

I would appreciate it so much!
George
 
  2  
Reply Wed 10 Aug, 2016 05:56 am
@JamesJamesBoBames,
Here's my take on it.

Si cum triumpho cladeque congredi
et duo impostores aeque tractare potes
0 Replies
 
eisla001
 
  1  
Reply Wed 1 Feb, 2017 02:32 pm
Hey George.

I was hoping you could help me out with a translation.

"Always put God first, stay humble and never forget where you came from"

I've googled it and received several different translations.

Thanks !
 

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