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Need Latin expert for quick translation

 
 
LionTamerX
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 Jun, 2014 07:46 pm
@George,
Thank you !
George
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Jun, 2014 05:50 am
@LionTamerX,
You're welcome, LionTamerX.
Where ya been?
LionTamerX
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 Jun, 2014 07:39 pm
@George,
Real life has been keeping me so busy, my online life has dwindled to nil. Well, nil and facebook.
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 Jun, 2014 07:43 pm
@LionTamerX,
Miss you..
0 Replies
 
ferid
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Jul, 2014 04:46 pm
@George,
hi.i want to tatoo vis mediatrix naturae.but its translation is the healing power of nature.can u fix it for me like the power of nature heals.
it will be like:
primum non nocere
(..vi mediatrix naturae..)
like it will be suitable.
sorry for poor english.thank a lot..)
George
 
  2  
Reply Fri 11 Jul, 2014 07:39 pm
@ferid,
If you want the translation of
"The power of nature heals"
it is
virtus natura medicatur
George
 
  2  
Reply Fri 11 Jul, 2014 07:41 pm
@George,
If that's not what you want, let me know.
I'll try again.
0 Replies
 
ferid
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Jul, 2014 03:45 pm
@George,
Primum non nocere
virtus natura mediacur.
good to me actually.what do you think.is it suitable?meaning?
i thought some type more rhymed.
whats your personal opinion...?
George
 
  2  
Reply Sat 12 Jul, 2014 08:25 pm
@ferid,
is it suitable?meaning?
Primum non nocere
First do no harm

Virtus natura medicatur.
The power of nature heals
0 Replies
 
George
 
  2  
Reply Sat 12 Jul, 2014 08:27 pm
@ferid,
i thought some type more rhymed.

Are you saying you want it to rhyme with Primum non nocere?
ferid
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Jul, 2014 02:41 am
@George,
yes.if it is posiibe.
and i want to know your oppinon .what do u think, do the translation and main idea of this sentences suit each other?
George
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Jul, 2014 06:24 am
@ferid,
It may be possible, but you will need to find a better translator than I am.
I would suggest hiring a professional.
ferid
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Jul, 2014 03:03 pm
@George,
thank u very much.i appreciate that.Smile
George
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Jul, 2014 05:44 am
@ferid,
You're welcome, ferid.
0 Replies
 
Moebius
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 01:37 pm
Hey everybody Smile
Newbie here; just registered.
I have a question about a couple of short Latin phrases.
Any help is greatly appreciated.

Is "I came, I saw, I loved" = "Veni, Vidi, Amavi"?
Is "I came, I loved, I conquered" = "Veni, Amavi, Vici"?

Is "Tamed by Caesar" = "Domito Caesar"?
My understanding is that the ablative ("from" case) also functions as the instrumental case in Latin. So I picked the ablative masculine singular of the perfect passive participle "Domitus". Is that correct?
Would it make more sense to say "Conquered by Caesar"? What would be the ablative masculine singular case of the perfect passive participle of the verb "Vinco" (to conquer).

Apologies if I'm butchering the Latin language Sad
George
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 Aug, 2014 06:40 pm
@Moebius,
> Is "I came, I saw, I loved" = "Veni, Vidi, Amavi"?
> Is "I came, I loved, I conquered" = "Veni, Amavi, Vici"?
Yes to both.

> Is "Tamed by Caesar" = "Domito Caesar"?
The case of domitus should be nominative, the
gender depends on who is tamed. Domitus if male, domita if female.
You're right about the ablative, but that is for Caesar, who is doing the taming.
So . . .
Domitus Caesare or Domita Caesare
Substituting "conquered" . . .
Victus Caesare or Victa Caesare
Moebius
 
  2  
Reply Sun 3 Aug, 2014 10:56 am
@George,
>The case of domitus should be nominative, the
gender depends on who is tamed. Domitus if male, domita if female.


The context is a nation, a kind of national motto "Tamed by Caesar" as in "This Land was Tamed by Caesar". Since the neuter is the same as masculine in Latin, I'll go with the masculine.

Nominative case. That makes perfect sense (sorry, gotta love those grammar puns).

Thanks for the assistance, George. Love the Jack avatar Smile
If you ever have any physics questions, I'm your geek!
George
 
  2  
Reply Sun 3 Aug, 2014 06:32 pm
@Moebius,
Moebius wrote:
. . . If you ever have any physics questions, I'm your geek!
Always good to have a go-to science guy.
0 Replies
 
WarrenGaebel
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Aug, 2014 10:04 am
@Rxcp93,
Hi, George. Do you know how hard it is to find someone who knows Latin well? Which is my way of thanking you for your replies in this forum. And now for the big ask.

I am trying to translate "Competence Inspires Confidence" into Latin, but since I don't know anything about Latin, it's not easy. So far I've come up with "Competentia Inspirat Fiduciam", which the online tools translate correctly. However, I don't trust the online tools and am hoping to get your two cents worth. Is this correct?

P.S. - I like using Fiduciam instead of the other alternatives because I run a bookkeeping business and fiduciary responsibility is one of the requirements of this kind of endeavour. It's like dropping a hint.
George
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Aug, 2014 11:09 am
@WarrenGaebel,
It is correct. The only change I would suggest is the word order.
Putting the verb last would be the more common Latin order, so
Competentia Fiduciam Inspirat.
 

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