18
   

Why I Support John McCain

 
 
Ramafuchs
 
  0  
Reply Thu 18 Sep, 2008 05:06 pm
@Ramafuchs,
Moreover
I beg you to spend some valuable hours to know about the next terrorist in White house ( I mean Obama and not the nasty one who is his counter part) here is the link.
http://sharp.sefora.org/people/presidential-candidates/barack-obama-presidential-candidate/
( I feel so sorry )
0 Replies
 
Ramafuchs
 
  0  
Reply Thu 18 Sep, 2008 05:42 pm
@cjhsa,
This is the last reaction to this post.
Kindly peruse the following quote( not written by Muslim nor Rama but an american) to get an apt, befitting response to your views about the religious attachment of your future president.
If you find time please peruse my god-forsaken thread in A2k to understand more about Muslims.
Thanks.
here is the quote( not directly relevant to your above observations but the reastion of a reader is pertient to make y<ou think.

"The Muslims we spoke to on our journey want better relations with the United States, but many are convinced they don't have a willing partner on the other side. Interestingly, many Americans seem to have the same perception, but in reverse. If this is the case, and each side has such negative views of the other and feels threatened by the other, how are we to improve relations?"
Now the reader's apt, prithy comment.

"S1m0n See Profile I'm a Fan of S1m0n permalink

Plenty of americans think american is at war with Islam, too, That's the subtext to every iteration of the Obama is a muslim lie.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/frankie-martin/journey-into-america_b_123705.html
0 Replies
 
Winter
 
  2  
Reply Thu 18 Sep, 2008 10:05 pm
@Parker Cross,
I support McCain because I don't support Obama. (I can't believe it's been this long since I've been on this site. I feel old.)
Ramafuchs
 
  0  
Reply Thu 18 Sep, 2008 10:50 pm
@Winter,
I respect your animosity/apathy against a person and i am not so impressed with your choice.
But still you are at liberty to make use of your fanchaise.
As a foreigner I wish to explore the mental faculty of American voters.
I live in germany.
Here is one quote from the other side of Atlantic ocean.
The public face of John McCain's campaign on the economy disappeared from public view yesterday after she queried whether he and his running-mate, Sarah Palin, were capable of leading a large US corporation.


Carly Fiorina, who climbed her way to the top of the corporate ladder as the chief executive officer at the technology giant Hewlett-Packard, made her remarks in a radio interview. Yesterday, her planned television appearances were abruptly cancelled. The gaffe was particularly embarrassing because they came from a businesswoman brought in to provide ballast to a candidate who admits that the economy is not his strong point.

Mr McCain has been racing to keep up with the turmoil in the US economy. The Republican candidate was wrong-footed by the $85bn (£47bn) government bailout of AIG, the world's biggest insurance company, as he was forced to declare his support for an action that only hours earlier he had opposed.

He abandoned his former stance to say the intervention was needed to protect the livelihoods of millions of Americans. The bailout was necessary because of "failed regulation, reckless management and a casino culture on Wall Street that has crippled one of the most important companies in America," he said. The crisis on Wall Street has helped his rival, Barack Obama, get back on the offensive as he sought to remind voters that Mr McCain was a supporter of the discredited Republican philosophy for financial deregulation.

Ms Fiorina's problems began after a sympathetic radio host heaped flattery on her business record " she rose from a secretarial position to run Hewlett-Packard, before being pushed out " before saying Senator McCain "thinks [Mrs Palin] has the experience to be president".

He then continued: "Do you think she has the experience to run a major company like Hewlett-Packard?" Ms Fiorina replied: "No, I don't. That's not what she is running for." Later, on television, Ms Fiorina was asked about her comment and said: "Well, I don't think John McCain could run a major corporation."

The one-time Fortune magazine "most powerful woman in business" added others to her list of people incapable of running Hewlett-Packard. First among them was Mr Obama, along with his Democratic running mate, Joseph Biden, but the damage was already done.

The former CEO has attracted frequent criticism on the campaign trail by offering positions on abortion and birth control at odds with the candidates'.

The row comes as Mr McCain's brief lead in the opinion polls after surprising everyone with his choice of Mrs Palin disappeared. Polls published yesterday showed the contest was tied. He won the Republican nomination by highlighting his national security credentials, at a time when the economy was not the dominant electoral issue.

The Obama campaign charged that: "If John McCain's top economic adviser doesn't think he can run a corporation, how on earth can he run the largest economy in the world in the midst of a financial crisis?"

Mr McCain has plenty of opportunities to get his message straight in the coming weeks and the give-and-take of one day's sparring is unlikely to make a difference. Far more troubling for his campaign has been the reluctance of conservative columnists to rally around his choice of running mate. The big guns of respected right-wing opinion, Charles Krauthammer, George Will and David Brooks, have all come out against her.

"Sarah Palin has many virtues," Mr Brooks wrote in The New York Times. "But the constructive act of governance is another matter. She has not been engaged in national issues, does not have a repertoire of historic patterns and, like President [George] Bush, she seems to compensate for her lack of experience with brashness and excessive decisiveness."

Krauthammer complained that instead of making the election a referendum on Mr Obama as the least experienced, least prepared presidential nominee in living memory, he had "fatally" undermined his entire line of attack. "The vice-president's only constitutional duty of any significance is to become president at a moment's notice. Palin is not ready. Nor is Obama. But with Palin, the case against Obama evaporates," he argued.
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/mccains-economic-adviser-out-of-limelight-after-gaffe-934251.html?%20ref=opinion
I wish and hope that the party which had made USA's economy in such an abysmal level should get elected and face the globe.
Ramafuchs
 
  0  
Reply Thu 18 Sep, 2008 10:56 pm
@Ramafuchs,
I have enough American sources to expose my IGNORANCE:
Here is one.

"As for Wall Street, Mr. McCain blamed the meltdown on “unbridled corruption and greed.” He called for a commission to find out what happened and propose solutions.
His diagnosis and his cure are misguided.
The crisis on Wall Street is fundamentally a failure to do the things that temper, detect and punish corruption and greed.
It was a failure to police the markets, to enforce rules, to heed and sound warnings and expose questionable products and practices.

The regulatory failure is rooted in a markets-are-good-government-is-bad ideology that has been ascendant as long as Mr. McCain has been in Washington and championed by his own party. If Mr. McCain adheres to some other belief system, we would like to hear about it.http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/17/opinion/17wed1.html?_r=1&oref=slogin
0 Replies
 
slkshock7
 
  4  
Reply Fri 19 Sep, 2008 05:41 pm
Completely different than the reason I support McCain, but might resonate with some of the more left-leaning folks that still have doubts about Obama.

source
Quote:
An economist explains why he thinks McCain's economic policies make more sense

by Steven Landsburg

But over the past few days, as McCain and Obama have ratcheted up their rhetoric over each others' "disastrous" economic policies, I decided to do a little research. Along the way, I had a few surprises about John McCain's voting record, some but not all of them pleasant. Now I don't think I'm undecided anymore.

Here are some of the things that made my decision easy, and some that made it hard:

1. Free trade and immigration are my top issues, and McCain wins on both.

These are my top issues for several reasons. First, trade is the engine of prosperity not just for the United States but also for the poorest of the world's poor. Nothing matters more than that. Second, the instinct to care about the national origin of your trading partner (or employer, or employee, or landlord, or tenant) is an ugly one, and the instinct to care about the national origin of other people's trading partners"and on that basis to interfere forcibly with other people's voluntary transactions"is even uglier.

Finally, protectionism, like creationism, requires an extraordinary level of willful ignorance. The consensus for free trade among economists is approximately as solid as the consensus for evolution among biologists, and it is a consensus supported by a solid body of both theory and observation. To ignore that consensus betrays a degree of anti-intellectualism that frightens me.

McCain is quite good on this issue, not just in terms of rhetoric (which I've known for a while) but in terms of voting record (which I've just recently researched). Obama, by contrast, promises to be our first explicitly protectionist president since Herbert Hoover. Some intervening presidents (Reagan, Bush I, and to a lesser extent Bush II) have been weak in their commitments to free trade, but none between Hoover and Obama has so explicitly rejected it.

2. McCain is not Bush. This came as a surprise to me. I'd been assuming, in my ill-read, uneducated way, that McCain had been complicit in most of the great travesties of the Bush administration and the execrable Republican Senate. I've learned that's largely untrue. He voted (to my great surprise!) against the prescription drug entitlement, against the Farm Security Bill, against milk subsidies, against Amtrak subsidies, and against highway subsidies.

Obama, by contrast, is in many ways a continuation of Bush. Like Bush (only far more so), Obama is fine with tariffs and subsidies. Like Bush, he wants to send jackbooted thugs into every meatpacking plant in America to rid the American workplace of anyone who happens to have been born on the wrong side of an imaginary line. Like Bush, he wants a more progressive tax code. (It is one of the great myths of 21st century that the Bush tax cuts made the tax code less progressive; the opposite is true. If you are in the bottom 38% of taxpayers, you now pay zero income tax"and therefore have an incentive to support any spending bill that comes down the pike.) Like Bush, he wants more regulation, not less.

3. But there's a lot about economics that McCain just doesn't get. This shows up most significantly in his energy policies. Every economist knows that the best way to discourage carbon emissions (or anything else for that matter) is to tax them. But McCain rejects a carbon tax in favor of one slightly inferior policy (cap and trade) and one grossly inferior policy (direct regulation, such as the CAFE standards for fuel efficiency).

<<<<Snipped to minimize size and get folks to look at the source vs. just this excerpt>>>>>>
4. McCain gets health care right. The reason poor Americans get too little health care is that rich Americans get too much. The reason rich Americans get too much is that they're overinsured, and therefore run to the doctor for minor problems. The reason they're overinsured is that employer-provided health benefits aren't taxed, so employers overprovide them.

It has been clear for decades that the single most effective way to control health care costs is to eliminate the tax break for employer-provided health care. According to one careful study by my colleague Charles Phelps (admittedly several years old, but I'm not sure anything relevant has changed), this single reform could reduce health care costs by 40% with essentially no effect on health care outcomes.

Essential as this reform may be, I'd always assumed it was a political non-starter. I was therefore astonished to learn that it's the essence of McCain's health care reform. (At the same time, he would give each individual $2500, and each family $5000, to use for health care.)

I am astonished that I hadn't heard about this, and particularly astonished that Barack Obama hasn't thrust it in my face with a negative spin. Possibly he has and I just wasn't paying attention. In any case, this is just what the doctor ordered, and I am delighted that McCain has put it on the table.

Obama, by contrast, wants poor people to get more medical care without addressing the problem of overuse by rich people. Where is that extra medical care going to come from? If the answer is "nowhere," then a primary effect of the Obama plan must be to raise prices, making doctors and hospitals the big beneficiaries.

<<Snipped>>>>

The bottom line is that I support John McCain. With trepidation.
engineer
 
  2  
Reply Fri 19 Sep, 2008 05:46 pm
@slkshock7,
slkshock7 wrote:

Completely different than the reason I support McCain, but might resonate with some of the more left-leaning folks that still have doubts about Obama.

If you look over the entire body of McCain's work, you would definitely come to this conclusion. Eight years ago, I would have enthusiastically supported him. Unfortunately, over the last two years, he has turned his back on all of his principled stands and embraced the Bush agenda, even as Bush is backing away from it. The McCain of 2008 is not the McCain of 2000 or even 2004. That's why I absolutely cannot vote for him.
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Sep, 2008 05:50 pm
@slkshock7,
Well, that's at odds with the article I just read in Newsweek, which shows that per-capita expenses on health care are essentially the same for poor and rich.

0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  3  
Reply Fri 19 Sep, 2008 05:51 pm
@slkshock7,
slkshock, I rarely, if ever, agree with most of your posts, but thanks for sharing that info on McCain's economic policies, because I'm also a "free-trader." I don't believe in tariffs, but we must also "punish" those who impose tariffs on our productsl; fair is fair.
spendius
 
  0  
Reply Fri 19 Sep, 2008 05:54 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Don't be so silly c.i. You a free-trader!! What a load of bollocks.
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Fri 19 Sep, 2008 06:00 pm
@spendius,
Show me where I said otherwise>?
spendius
 
  2  
Reply Fri 19 Sep, 2008 06:02 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Quote:
I'm also a "free-trader." I don't believe in tariffs.


cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Sep, 2008 06:04 pm
@spendius,
spendi, You are a simpleton; I asked where I said I wasn't a "free-trader."
0 Replies
 
slkshock7
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Sep, 2008 07:22 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Thanks, CI, you made my evening...now if McCain's position on trade causes you to support him in Nov, you'll make my month, at least.
0 Replies
 
slkshock7
 
  3  
Reply Fri 19 Sep, 2008 07:35 pm
@engineer,
Engineer,
I'm real concerned McCain's occasional liberal excursions as well, but still highly prefer McCain over Obama, who most certainly will take this nation on the wrong tack that would take us decades to roll back.

My take is that President McCain is smart enough to know where his bread is buttered and will recognize (or be physically jerked back) when he strays too far off the conservative plantation.

And on the issues I most care about, I'll accept the risk he represents rather than the certainty that Obama represents.
JTT
 
  2  
Reply Fri 19 Sep, 2008 07:48 pm
@slkshock7,
Quote:
I'm real concerned McCain's occasional liberal excursions as well, but still highly prefer McCain over Obama, who most certainly will take this nation on the wrong tack that would take us decades to roll back.

My take is that President McCain is smart enough to know where his bread is buttered and will recognize (or be physically jerked back) when he strays too far off the conservative plantation.

And on the issues I most care about, I'll accept the risk he represents rather than the certainty that Obama represents.


I'm always amazed at how right wingers can say/write crap like this with what seems to be a straight face. What planet have you been visiting for the last eight years?
slkshock7
 
  2  
Reply Fri 19 Sep, 2008 08:55 pm
@JTT,
JTT,
The last 8 years have not been that bad ...conservatives have maintained status quo....even improved our position on the Supreme Court. The nation hasn't had another terror attack on our soil for the past 7 years. Our taxes have gone down....Sure the economy's taken a down turn, but I think the Presidency has very little ability to influence the economy either up or down. The economy will recover in its own time, whether Obama wins...or McCain wins.

Can you really say...with a straight face....that we would be better off today coming off a Gore or Kerry presidency?
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Sep, 2008 09:06 pm
@slkshock7,
Quote:
I'm real concerned McCain's occasional liberal excursions as well, but still highly prefer McCain over Obama, who most certainly will take this nation on the wrong tack that would take us decades to roll back.

My take is that President McCain is smart enough to know where his bread is buttered and will recognize (or be physically jerked back) when he strays too far off the conservative plantation.

And on the issues I most care about, I'll accept the risk he represents rather than the certainty that Obama represents.

Yes;
I must agree
, SLkshock7





David
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  2  
Reply Fri 19 Sep, 2008 09:10 pm
@slkshock7,
Quote:
The last 8 years have not been that bad


I rest my case.

Quote:
Can you really say...with a straight face....that we would be better off today coming off a Gore or Kerry presidency?


Absofuckinglutely.

Why is it that so ******* concerned about how America has done, but you express no concern for a country you and yours have trashed, thousands of innocents killed. For christ sakes, where is your sense of morality?
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Fri 19 Sep, 2008 09:43 pm
I never liked the Bushes much.
I thought Reagan fell into error, in selecting Bush,
but no matter WHAT, the GOP is not as bad, not
as hostile to personal freedom, as the liberal Demos.

FREEDOM is everything





David
0 Replies
 
 

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