14
   

Ding-dong! The Witch of Cuba is dead! Castro's dead at 90.

 
 
blatham
 
  4  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2016 08:19 am
The Guardian has a piece up now that is relevant;

Quote:
Castro's legacy and the envy of many nations: social care in Cuba
Cuba’s literacy rate is at 100% and life expectancy parallels first world nations, despite limited funding and supplies
http://bit.ly/2fEoiLM
Blickers
 
  2  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2016 09:27 am
@blatham,
Quote blatham:
Quote:
The Guardian has a piece up now that is relevant;

Quote:
Quote:

Castro's legacy and the envy of many nations: social care in Cuba
Cuba’s literacy rate is at 100% and life expectancy parallels first world nations,

Ahem. I just posted the same information from UN sources in a post earlier in this thread. No mention of it from you. But the Guardian comes out with the same information, suddenly you post it as relevant.

Is that the system around here?
Blickers posts it first = not relevant.
The Guardian says it = relevant.
Razz Razz Razz Razz Razz Razz Razz Razz Razz Razz

blatham
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2016 09:32 am
@Blickers,
No reason to feel badly. I saw and appreciated your earlier post on this. But when I post a link such as this one, I do so for reader information. I don't require any response to validate the content. Nothing to do with you at all.
georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2016 09:54 am
@blatham,
And the readers are grateful for this penetrating, illuminating information about the workers paradise in Cuba. To think that we all have missed the salient virtues of this failed state for so long !

I wonder how the Castro fiefdom prevents the overwhelming influx of immigrants, undoubtedly seeking freedom and relief from their suffering in adjacent countries. That the exact opposite is the case appears to be something that both the Guardian and the servile UN agencies overlooked.

"100% literacy and life expectancy "in parallel" with that of developed countries" . What the hell does that mean? How reliable is data from ther Cuban government anyway?

The fact is that a scan of national life expectancy tables reveals there are two groups in the world ( modern, developed nations and those that are not) , each with very small internal differences in their reported life expectancys and relatively large differences between them. In the case at hand Cuba is behind Portugual.

It appears there is no level to which some reporters of information will not stoop.
Blickers
 
  3  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2016 10:28 am
@georgeob1,
georgeob1:
Portugal is an advanced nation with a very high standard of living. Being two places down from Portugal in general living standards, (in a world of 200 nations) is no shame at all for a country in an area largely populated by countries far, far below Portugal and the rest of the very advanced nations. The fact that Cuba is up in the top tier was the big surprise for me.

Economically, the Castro regime seems to be a boon for Cubans' living standards, which are in the top rung of nations. Something I didn't know until now.
ehBeth
 
  3  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2016 10:33 am
@Blickers,
Blickers wrote:
The fact that Cuba is up in the top tier was the big surprise for me.


there's a good reason some American medical travel (aka medical tourism) is to Cuba.

some of the best-trained doctors and some of the best medical facilities in the world are there. my old room-mate considered it as a factor when she moved there in the early 90's. Cuban-trained docs and researchers who come to Canada seem to get work more easily than other groups of refugees/immigrants.


blatham
 
  3  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2016 10:49 am
@georgeob1,
George
I really think you and Allan West ought to go on pilgrimage to the Vatican. Some viewpoints should NOT stand
Quote:
Pope Francis issues UNHOLY response to Castro’s death
http://bit.ly/2gyM00w
georgeob1
 
  0  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2016 11:06 am
@ehBeth,
It really isn't much to brag about when one looks at the economic statistics of Cuba before the Castro takeover. Bad governance under Batista to be sure, but there were far better remedies than what the Castros imposed on the unfortunate Cuban people. Prerevolutionary Cuba was one of the most prosperous and literate countries in Latin America. Many thousands of refugees were created by the revolution which removed all political freedom from ther Cubam people saving only a few relics of a better ages such as the now socialist medical care which the government exports in a form of indentured servitude to get foreign exchange. (I wonder why these happy revolutionarty doctors go to Canada, and if their training really meets contemporary Canadian standards.)

That this singular and rather pathetic achievment is the only talking point that those who would rastionalize a revolution that has tyrranized the Cuban people for 57 years is a telling reminder of the emptiness of their claims.
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2016 11:09 am
@georgeob1,
georgeob1 wrote:
That this singular and rather pathetic achievment


excellent medical care is pathetic?

really?

0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2016 11:10 am
@georgeob1,
georgeob1 wrote:
I wonder if their training really meets contemporary Canadian standards.


why would you doubt it?
georgeob1
 
  0  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2016 11:11 am
@blatham,
blatham wrote:

George
I really think you and Allan West ought to go on pilgrimage to the Vatican. Some viewpoints should NOT stand


What the hell does that mean????

I'm not a frequenter of Allen West's material. Apparently you are. Part of your inexhaustable research?
0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  0  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2016 11:13 am
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:

you doubt it?


You didn't answer the question. Cuba is far behind the rest of the world in modern medical technology. That doesn't mean their doctors are without skilkls or ability, but it does have some relevance to the facts of contemporary medicine - even in Canada.

Why would you question that?
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2016 11:15 am
@georgeob1,
georgeob1 wrote:

It really isn't much to brag about


Bragging? American medical tourism to Cuba - it's just a thing that happens.

Just like American medical tourism to Canada, to Thailand, to India, to China, to Brazil etc etc. American dental tourism to just about everywhere.

People go where there is good, affordable, care. It's that simple.

In the case of travelling to Cuba, it means they have to travel to Canada first (unless they've signed up for one of those faux educational/religious tours) and they do it on a non-US issued credit card.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2016 11:16 am
@georgeob1,
georgeob1 wrote:
Cuba is far behind the rest of the world in modern medical technology.


that is simply not true
0 Replies
 
Blickers
 
  2  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2016 11:30 am
@georgeob1,
According to the World Health Organization statistics for life expectancy at birth, out of 183 ranked countries the US is 31st, (79.3 years), and Cuba is 32nd, (79.1 years). The assumption has to be that medical systems are roughly equal, otherwise you would not have people living the same amount of years.
georgeob1
 
  0  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2016 11:48 am
@Blickers,
Blickers wrote:

According to the World Health Organization statistics for life expectancy at birth, out of 183 ranked countries the US is 31st, (79.3 years), and Cuba is 32nd, (79.1 years). The assumption has to be that medical systems are roughly equal, otherwise you would not have people living the same amount of years.


But as you say, that's an assumption, not a fact. There are many lifestyle, dfietary and other issues that affect longevity, and that is not the only relevant statistical measure of the effectiveness of medical care. As I suggested earlier the differences in life expectancy among developed nations are small and generally statistically insignificant, while the dfifferences between developed and undeveloped countries are very large and of obvious significance.

Pre revolutionary Cuba was one of the richest (in terms of per capits gdp) countries in Latin America, despite social inequities and very bad governance uinder Batista. That the Cuban revolution has been able to maintain (or reinvent) quality medical care while at the same time wrecking agricultural and manufacturing productivity and destroying the political and freedoms it citizens once enjoyed, is indeed notable and praiseworthy. However it is no rationalization for the awful record of a "revolution" that has revealed itself to merely be a tyranny inder a family of thugs.
Ceili
 
  4  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2016 11:55 am
http://www.forbes.com/sites/billfrist/2015/06/08/cubas-most-valuable-export-its-healthcare-expertise/#f00c524325c9

Quote:
Cuba's Most Valuable Export: Its Healthcare Expertise

Bill Frist , CONTRIBUTOR
I cover global and domestic health care and health care reform.

When you think of Cuban exports, you might think of sugar, or perhaps its famously sought-after cigars. But one of the nation’s most profitable exports is actually its own healthcare professionals.

The Cuban government reportedly earns $8 billion a year in revenues from professional services carried out by its doctors and nurses, with some 37,000 Cuban nationals currently working in 77 countries. The socialist regime allows the government to collect a portion of the incomes earned by Cuban workers abroad.

For example, in 2013 Cuba inked a deal with the Brazilian Health Ministry to send 4,000 Cuban doctors to underserved regions of Brazil by the end of the year – worth as much as $270 million a year to the Castro government. By the end of 2014, Brazil’s Mais Medicos program, meaning “More Doctors,” had brought in 14,462 health professionals – 11,429 of which came from Cuba.

Over the past 50 years, Cuba consistently used the export of its doctors as a powerful and far-reaching tool of health diplomacy. The island nation has built good will and improved its global standing with emerging countries around the world during its years of isolation. It sent its first doctors overseas as far back as 1963, and to date has sent physicians to over 100 countries.

In my travels doing medical mission work to underserved regions in over a dozen African nations, the most common nonindigenous health personnel I run across are doctors and nurses from Cuba offering frontline primary and emergency care. They serve and cure, building trust in Cuba’s name globally.

Why is the medical expertise of this impoverished nation in demand? And why is it home to a population whose life expectancies rival those of much richer countries? Researchers have called this phenomenon the Cuban Health Paradox.
On two health-oriented trips to Cuba in the past year, what struck me was a systematically planned and organized primary care delivery system that captured the doctor-patient relationships of my father’s era of medical practice. Cuba treats healthcare as a human right, specifically stipulated in its constitution. Cuban nationals receive care for free, and have a neighborhood primary care physician who often knows them by name and sees them regularly.

The doctors are paid paltry amounts, many having second jobs. But in my conversations with them, they reflect love for their work and a palpable passion about caring for their patients. In turn, the patients trust and respect their conveniently-located and easy-to-reach doctor, go to them early in the course of an illness without financial barrier, and are likely to follow their recommendations.
0 Replies
 
McGentrix
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2016 01:26 pm
Why would anyone bother to say anything nice about Fidel Castro? I do not understand that a single bit. This thread started out so well with a celebration that an evil had past this world and then the bleeding hearts appeared... I just don't get you people sometimes. Fidel was an evil person. He should be celebrated as you would Hitler, or Pol Pot, or any of the other murdering dictators that have cursed this world.
georgeob1
 
  0  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2016 02:53 pm
@McGentrix,
Canadians seem to like him. I don't know why, though it could be a reflection of a latent dislike of us. That, however, is their problem.
0 Replies
 
Baldimo
 
  0  
Reply Mon 28 Nov, 2016 03:10 pm
@McGentrix,
They can't have someone who ran a political system they envied put to shame. Did you notice that it was the pro-Castro people who started in the pointless moral relativism between Castro and Batista? No one was even talking about Batista but the lefties couldn't help but try and save the memory of poor Castro.

I'm not surprised by Obama's comments on Castro, I'm ashamed to hear my President say them, but I'm not surprised. Obama has been kissing the ass of these type of people since he came into office. Just like when dealing with terrorists, he can't call a spade a spade.
0 Replies
 
 

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