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The Most Recent Movie You've Seen on Streaming, Broadcast TV, or Movie Theater?

 
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 28 Mar, 2018 04:17 pm
@farmerman,
The other day I watched The Incredible Shrinking man all the way through for the first time. It had always lost me when he fought and killed the spider with a straight pin. In a more realistic portrayal, the spider would have had him dangling in its web in a hurry, unless he employed a better strategy, the nature of which eludes my comprehension. I was surprised that the ending was pretty much the same as in the novel.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Wed 28 Mar, 2018 05:04 pm
Just watched Revolutionary Road w/ Leo DiCaprio, Kate Winslet & Kathy Bates.

I really enjoyed DiCaprio's acting in this one. Very different from his other roles.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 28 Mar, 2018 06:26 pm
https://plumvillage.org/walk-with-me/

Quote:

Through intimate interviews and observational filming, “Walk With Me – On The Road With Thich Nhat Hanh”, offers a rare insight into monastic life and the deeply personal reasons why Thich Nhat Hanh’s monks and nuns decided to leave their families and follow in his footsteps.

Emerging from this direct observation is an immersive film composed of a collection of poetic impressions, fragmented moments and images that unfold as the four seasons come and go. Like all random moments in life, these seemingly fragmented impressions all have some intrinsic commonality in that they touch the simple ordinary presence of being here, now.


definitely not my lifestyle and I wouldn't have selected this doc on my own but I'm glad I had tickets and went

absorbing and thought-provoking

0 Replies
 
Kolyo
 
  1  
Reply Wed 28 Mar, 2018 09:43 pm
I saw Ready Player One at the cinema tonight.

Steady barrage of cliches and overplayed pop music.
I don't know why I keep going to see Spielberg movies, but, hey, I guess he knows something I don't, and that's why he's a billionaire.

(Here's what he knows: platitudes and advertising.)

I liked Ben Mendelsohn in it, though. So much that I might have to see all of Bloodline after all, because he's so likable as the unlikable guy.
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Mar, 2018 06:49 am
@Kolyo,
Thanks for the heads up on this. I became a Mendelsohn fan via Bloodline, too.
0 Replies
 
maporsche
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Mar, 2018 11:50 am
@Kolyo,
Did you read the book or have any idea what to expect before going in?
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Mar, 2018 12:25 pm
@Kolyo,
Kolyo wrote:

I saw Ready Player One at the cinema tonight.

Steady barrage of cliches and overplayed pop music.
I don't know why I keep going to see Spielberg movies, but, hey, I guess he knows something I don't, and that's why he's a billionaire.

You probably have an issue with Ernst Cline more than Steven Spielberg here.

Quote:
(Here's what he knows: platitudes and advertising.)

Wow! That's simplistic, drastically dismissive, unnecessarily cynical and a bit off target for his recent work....
What were the platitudes of Bridge of Spies and what was it advertising?
Last year's The Post, though kind of inferior to Bridge of Spies, not perfect and held several cringy Oscar baity speeches that could have been edited better to avoid being so preachy in its delivery, did have some great ensemble acting, chemistry between characters, and many cinematic moments (score and cinematography).

Okay... you could argue that it was advertising the hell out of the legitimacy of the Washington Times (especially raising far above the New York Times given some historical revisionism/rearrangements of the historical timeline).

I haven't seen Ready Player One, and admittedly, I am a big fan of the book. I'd say that The BFG was his weakest recent film and it doesn't deserve the two criticisms you laid at the Oscar winning director's feet. Far from being a hyper commercial for pop culture and playing it safe (away from the sharp, critical mind of the Roald Dahl book it was based on)
and a tad too modest isn't the same as being full of platitudes.

Am I right to assume that you literally have not seen the above mentioned films, let alone hear about them?

If you were limiting these criticisms to his role as producer? That would be a legitimate argument against the legendary filmmaker.
0 Replies
 
Kolyo
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Mar, 2018 04:00 pm
@maporsche,
maporsche wrote:

Did you read the book or have any idea what to expect before going in?


I didn't read the book, and, what's more, I'm not a gamer. Perhaps that was my real problem. I hated the 80's hard rock music they played during battles, but, hey, if I were a gamer, maybe Joan Jet would be my normal soundtrack for medieval battle scenes. (Also, maybe "PG-13" should have warned me that the target audience wasn't the mature target audience of Saving Private Ryan or Schindler's List.)

But if Spielberg had made the movie for people who had read the book, he would not have grossed much. A blockbuster should stand on its own merits. And I had some expectations going in, which were based on the 10-15 times I saw the trailer.

There was supposed to be a slow progression by our hero through some kind of tournament in which millions were competing. There was supposed to be an organized rebellion against the corporate gaming establishment. Now they simply didn't do much with either of those story-lines. So really, I felt ripped off after seeing the thing.
maporsche
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Mar, 2018 12:57 am
@Kolyo,
That’s All fine man. I’ll afmit To not having reAd your entire post right now.

I loved the book. Loved it. The fact that you hadn’t read it only means that I should base my oppnion on. You based on that. That’s no problem.

Your critique would mean more to me if you HAD read the book and loved it and still hated the movie.



Now you’re opinion just means nothing, which is fine.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Mar, 2018 02:28 pm
We watched Darkest Hour re: Churchhill and his war cabinet trying to save the troops at Dunkirk and NOT negotiate a peace with Hitler.
The movie was really good but some problems in the history bothered me. It did NOT mention the German "Standown" from my 28-June4, which is when the UK was evacking the troops
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Apr, 2018 04:26 pm
Ready Player One 3D

I advise seeing the movie in 3D Laser IMAX if possible.

3D because the virtual reality scenes are really good in 3D.

Laser IMAX because they do 3D at 4K resolution. Other theaters can offer either 3D or 4K, but not both.

You might enjoy the movie more if you've seen The Shining before.

You know, I never found the Easter Egg in Adventure. I won it lots of times. Even won it while constraining myself to make it harder, like winning without killing any dragons. Or trapping the bat and all the dragons alive in one of the castles.

I could never figure out the Easter Egg though.
maporsche
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Apr, 2018 05:00 pm
@oralloy,
I’ve seen it twice now. I really enjoyed it.
oralloy
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Apr, 2018 05:27 pm
@maporsche,
Did you ever play Adventure?

If so, did you ever find the Easter Egg?

I haven't read the book (yet) but I've read a Wikipedia summary of the book. It's a shame they couldn't make the Dungeons and Dragons module fit into the movie. I remember that module as fondly as I remember playing Adventure.
maporsche
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Apr, 2018 05:58 pm
@oralloy,
oralloy wrote:

Did you ever play Adventure?

If so, did you ever find the Easter Egg?

I haven't read the book (yet) but I've read a Wikipedia summary of the book. It's a shame they couldn't make the Dungeons and Dragons module fit into the movie. I remember that module as fondly as I remember playing Adventure.


I may have, but I don't remember. That was a bit before my time (born in 1979).

I get why the D&D module was left out (and replaced with the movie piece); the movie needed broader cultural appeal. I thought they did good with it though.
0 Replies
 
Kolyo
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Apr, 2018 04:41 pm
Well, I was probably too hard on Spielberg in terms of his entire career.

I knew about Schindlers List and Saving Private Ryan, but a look at his Wikipedia page also revealed he directed Amistad and Lincoln. I also didn't see as much shallow fluff on his resume as I had thought I would.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Apr, 2018 06:31 am
@Kolyo,
And The Bridge of Spies, a Cold War spy thriller based on the Coen Brothers script; and The Post, based on the true story about the publishing of the Pentagon Papers by the New York Times and the Washington Post? They're two Oscar nominated films that are far from shallow fluff.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Fri 6 Apr, 2018 10:46 am
@Kolyo,
Spielberg can make a strong run at both poles.
"Raiders of the Lost ARk" and "Jurassic Park" were two of his best, while"Indiana Jones and the Crystal Skull and Jurassic World" were two of the worst movies ever made . Course he was only serving as a titular Executive Producer on "Jurassic WOrld"
maporsche
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Apr, 2018 10:55 am
@farmerman,
I thought Jurassic World was a fun movie.

I have wasted 2 hours in much worse ways.
0 Replies
 
Kolyo
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Apr, 2018 08:25 pm
@tsarstepan,
I haven't seen either of them.

I will tell you, though, that I've liked everything I've seen that was directed by him (at least 10 movies) apart from War of the Worlds and Ready Player One. (As farmerman said, he didn't direct Jurassic World).

I guess I got him with confused with his image. The actual movies I see in his filmography at Wikipedia are pretty great. I loved most of them without ever knowing who had directed them.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Apr, 2018 09:43 pm
Just back from seeing the most extraordinary documentary.

I'll be thinking about this for a while.

I'm volunteering at Hot Docs again this year. This doc was not on my list but I'm so glad I worked it tonight.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/film/article-documentary-reveals-the-man-behind-the-sos-letter-from-chinas/

Quote:
The SOS was hidden in a tombstone. It was a pretend grave marker, made of Styrofoam and purchased at a Kmart an ocean away from where the desperate message had been written. It sat in its box in a storage shed in Damascus, Ore., for about two years, until Julie Keith dug it out in the fall of 2012 for her daughter’s birthday party, which the then-almost-five-year-old requested be Halloween-themed. Out fell a note, handwritten in English and Chinese.

“Sir: If you occassionally (sic) buy this product, please kindly resend this letter to the World Human Right Organization,” began the letter, written from a Chinese forced-labour camp. “Thousands people here who are under the persicution (sic) of the Chinese Communist Party Government will thank and remember you forever.”

Keith didn’t have luck when she tried to connect with a human-rights organization, so she contacted The Oregonian newspaper. The note soon attracted worldwide media attention. Through international pressure, the story effected historic change in China, with the closing of labour camps such as the one where the novelty tombstone was made – the notorious Masanjia.

Now, for the first time, the full story is being told in English, in a documentary that reveals the letter writer’s true identity. In his new documentary, Peabody Award-winning Canadian filmmaker Leon Lee collaborated with the man who wrote the note – Sun Yi – and an anonymous filmmaking partner in China. Letter from Masanjia has its world premiere at Hot Docs this weekend in Toronto, before screening at DOXA in Vancouver next weekend.

Mr. Lee, who was born in China and now lives in Surrey, B.C., has an interest in telling stories about contemporary China that can’t be told from China; his documentary Human Harvest – about illegal organ harvesting – received the prestigious Peabody in 2014. After he saw news reports about the letter, he reached out to Ms. Keith and tried to find the person who had written it. Finally, in 2016, Mr. Lee tracked down Mr. Sun, with the help of dissident journalists who are members of the Chinese underground.

An encrypted Skype call was arranged. Mr. Sun had been working on a book about his story, but he felt a film would be more powerful. Mr. Sun, however, didn’t know how to make a film or even operate a camera. And it is not safe for Mr. Lee to return to China, given his previous films. “We two had to pair up to pull this off,” says Mr. Lee, 37.

Over Skype, Mr. Lee trained Mr. Sun in the art of filmmaking, told him what kind of equipment to buy and instructed him to find a trusted partner for the project. Mr. Sun sent compressed footage through an encrypted drop-box-type service, Mr. Lee checked the footage and offered feedback, and periodically the footage would be sent through underground networks on an encrypted hard drive. Once Mr. Lee received the hard drive, Mr. Sun sent him the password. “It was set up in a way that if I input the wrong password, then the hard drive would be permanently locked and all the footage would be gone,” Mr. Lee says.

In this way, Mr. Sun and his anonymous partner documented his story about joining the Falun Gong movement, which was later outlawed; the horrific torture Mr. Sun underwent at the labour camp; and his clandestine letter-writing campaign – about 20 SOS notes stuffed into Halloween decorations bound, he figured, for the West, given the English used in the packaging.

By the time one of those notes made headlines, Mr. Sun had been released. He eventually managed to escape China for Jakarta, where he claimed refugee status. Finally, Mr. Sun and Mr. Lee could meet in person.

“By that time I have been communicating with him frequently, it was more than a year, he was like an old friend. I knew him inside-out,” Mr. Lee says. “But meeting him, I kept wondering how such a gentle and quiet man possessed such strength.”

Ms. Keith also travelled to Jakarta and their meeting is documented in the film.

Sun Yi, left, eventually managed to escape China for Jakarta, where he claimed refugee status and was finally able to meet filmmaker Leon Lee in person.

Letter from Masanjia also includes interviews with two of Mr. Sun’s former labour-camp guards, who are not identified by name. While Mr. Lee expressed concerns for their safety if they appeared in the documentary, Mr. Sun advocated for their inclusion, telling Mr. Lee, ” ’This is not only going to help the film, but it’s going to help these guards,’ ” Mr. Lee recalls. “Because he knew how remorseful they were. Which turned out to be true; he told me after the interview they were very relieved. For the first time in their life, they had done something right.”

Mr. Lee, who has lived in Canada since 2006, says China’s economic power has made it difficult for his previous work to be distributed. “Many distributors and businesses in this industry rely on China now because it is such a large market, so many people have told me in private that they love the film, but can’t distribute it.”

Despite this obstacle, Mr. Lee hopes Letter from Masanjia is widely viewed and that its message provokes further action.

“Sun Yi wrote about 20 letters; this is the only one that came out. If Julie just gave up or didn’t really care, then nothing would happen. Tens of thousands of people … might still be locked up in labour camps all over China. I guess what I’m trying to [express] in the film is if an ordinary woman through her small action can do this, what if more people stand up and do something?” he says.

“Hopefully, after learning about Sun Yi’s incredible story, people will feel inspired and encouraged to do something about the injustice they see. Quite often people are thinking how [can I] make a difference? It’s such a complex problem, whatever it is, and being one person, what can I do? Now, from this story we know that everybody can do something and you never know what this might lead to.”

Letter from Masanjia screens at Hot Docs in Toronto April 27 and 29 and May 4 (hotdocs.ca), and at DOXA in Vancouver on May 5 (doxafestival.ca).



The woman from Oregon, and the director, were there for a Q&A following the world premiere tonight. Amazing.


 

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