18
   

THE GREAT WAR--A CENTURY AGO . . .

 
 
Setanta
 
Reply Fri 27 Jun, 2014 06:13 pm
The Archduke Franz Ferdinand was shot in Sarajevo one hundred years ago today (June 28, 1914--it is now June 28 in Europe), leading to the First World War. People did not, of course, call it the First World War, because they didn't know there would be a second. In the English-speaking world it was known as the Great War. At the time of the assassination of the Archduke, people feared that the Third Balkan War would begin--no one yet knew what the actual consequence would be.

Please use this thread to post your thoughts on this very important event, and that very tragic war.
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jun, 2014 07:16 pm
Thinking about that war, I have come to realize that most of what I know is in the form of impressions and movies, like Sergeant York. I know far fewer details than I imagined. The only person I knew who wore the uniform back then didn't actually go to Europe, until the shooting was over. An Okie in Paris. This thread may give me more to go on.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jun, 2014 07:47 pm
I've read some, of more or lesser interest, but interesting to me. My uncle Charlie, gassed in WWI, eventually died later, head of the then tech (I forget the words, tool and dye division) of Douglas just after their plane got made, late 44, I think. Long time not very well. A southwest explorer. I still have his rocks and his tool chest.

He is the man that taught me about ice cream. It was in Oklahoma on the back porch on the landing above the steps. I remember it as peach. I was four. I got to crank it once or twice. No, I don't equate him with ice cream, I remember him from slightly later as not there but leaving many books. Or, both of those.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jun, 2014 07:52 pm
Ah. I guess I was to speak about Ferdinand and all the bother.

It's Charlie I remember.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Jun, 2014 02:41 am
I've mentioned before that i was raised by my grandparents. My grandfather served in France. When i was a small boy, the veterans of that war formed the color guard in the Fourth of July parade, and the vets of W.W. II marched behind them. The war seemed very real to me than, less than 50 years after it had ended. Consider, if you will, that it has been less than 50 years since the war in Vietnam ended. Vietnam is still very real for a lot of people.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Jun, 2014 03:51 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
The war seemed very real to me than, less than 50 years after it had ended. Consider, if you will, that it has been less than 50 years since the war in Vietnam ended. Vietnam is still very real for a lot of people.

I remember the 50th anniversary of the battle of the Somme, when I was a kid. We did Wilfred Owen in English class that year. a 68 year old at that time could have taken part.


0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Jun, 2014 04:13 am
When i was very small, there was even a veteran of the Spanish War who would be driven in a convertible in the parade. The people who were then the age i am now were, many of them, veterans of the Great War. It's like the American Civil War. The centenary was a big deal when i was a child. It must seem ancient history to kids in school these days.
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Jun, 2014 04:22 am
The Great War and Modern Memory
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Sat 28 Jun, 2014 05:13 am
Cool, Boss . . . thanks . . .
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  2  
Reply Sat 28 Jun, 2014 05:15 am
@jespah,
Great book jes. As are all his books.
It was a war that produced great literature and Fussell takes advantage of this.

I read a book once, written in 1928 that mentioned the First World War. I wish I could remember what it was called.
saab
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Jun, 2014 05:33 am
As Scandinavia was not involved in The Great War as it kept neutral.
Denmark open up for war prisoners from the East front especially Russians German and Austrain/Hungarian war prisoners.
My Danish great aunt took a degree as Red Cross sister during the war to help with prisoners of war. I still have the small book from which the young women were taught and I also have her Danish-Russian language book. She spoke German fluently and also wanted to be able to say a few words to the Russians and read the envelopes correctly.
0 Replies
 
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Jun, 2014 10:37 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
.... In the English-speaking world it was known as the Great War.
Was it not also called the War to End All Wars? I consider it one of the most important events in human history, or at least in recorded history. To many, it appeared as if the entire fabric of society changed.

For one thing, the loss of large numbers of men provided opportunity for women to enter the workplace, perhaps giving impetus to the suffrage movement.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  3  
Reply Sat 28 Jun, 2014 11:48 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
It must seem ancient history to kids in school these days.

In the 1980s my little son thought the 'olden days' were when there was only black and white TV. However, British school parties regularly visit the Flanders battlefields and one hears of kids, big tough 16 year old rugby playing boys, weeping at the sight of the cemeteries and when they play the Last Post at 8 PM at the Menin Gate.
0 Replies
 
Romeo Fabulini
 
  -2  
Reply Sat 28 Jun, 2014 11:58 am
My grandmas brother Alf (below) was killed in WW1 many years before I was born.

http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g64/PoorOldSpike/alfT.png

Beats me why he and thousands of other Englishmen were called up and sent to France to help the French and Belgians fight the Germans.
Even America called up people and shipped them across the Atlantic to fight!
What the hell have the French and Belgians ever done for us?
If it was me, I'd have probably refused to go.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sat 28 Jun, 2014 12:05 pm
@Romeo Fabulini,
Romeo Fabulini wrote:

Beats me why he and thousands of other Englishmen were called up and sent to France to help the French and Belgians fight the Germans.
It had nothing to do with France (or the French) but with Belgium.
Seems, you were ill during that history lesson about Treaty of London.

http://i1334.photobucket.com/albums/w641/Walter_Hinteler/a_zps54edb67b.jpg
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  3  
Reply Sat 28 Jun, 2014 12:07 pm
@Romeo Fabulini,
Romeo Fabulini wrote:

What the hell have the French and Belgians ever done for us?

You utter, utter wanker. **** off.
Romeo Fabulini
 
  -2  
Reply Sat 28 Jun, 2014 12:11 pm
@contrex,
Hey mate I see in your profile that you're a Spaniard and have obviously still got sour grapes because we English trashed your Armada..Smile
Romeo Fabulini
 
  -3  
Reply Sat 28 Jun, 2014 12:14 pm
Quote:
Walter Hinteler said: it had nothing to do with France (or the French) but with Belgium.

So what?
I'd probably still have refused to go and kill Germans for the Belgians..Smile
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sat 28 Jun, 2014 12:21 pm
The main participants in the World War I mobilized over the course of about a week.

http://i1334.photobucket.com/albums/w641/Walter_Hinteler/b_zpsed61aa62.jpg
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Jun, 2014 12:23 pm
@Romeo Fabulini,
Romeo Fabulini wrote:

Hey mate I see in your profile that you're a Spaniard and have obviously still got sour grapes because we English trashed your Armada..Smile


I'm a Brit who works in France near Perpignan and lives over the border in Catalunya which is still part of Spain for the time being. Round here, when ladies have their period, they often call it "having the English to stay", because it's uncomfortable and you can't have any fun until it's over, apparently. You illustrate the aptness quite clearly.


0 Replies
 
 

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