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What are your pet peeves re English usage?

 
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Nov, 2005 08:22 pm
No, no, Setanta. JTT received a divine message from Steven Pinker hissownself. Have some respect for your betters (and mine, too, of course). May whoever is the patron saint of language preserve us from pedants who claim to eschew pedantry.
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Nov, 2005 08:25 pm
P.S. D'ye think JTT is really Bill Casselman?
0 Replies
 
goodfielder
 
  3  
Reply Tue 1 Nov, 2005 08:26 pm
Snuck. I hate that non-word. It's "sneaked". But even journalists here are using it now. It's right up there with "dove" - not the bird but the past tense of "to dive". It's "dived" not "dove".
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Nov, 2005 08:27 pm
Even Casselman showed a modicum of style . . . here, i'll google it, that's where all the answers are . . .
0 Replies
 
goodfielder
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Nov, 2005 08:28 pm
sorry about the duplicate that SNEAKED in here somehow.
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Nov, 2005 08:31 pm
Clever how you snuck that in, goodie. Smile
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Nov, 2005 06:26 pm
snuk dove

snove duk


whatever it is im absolutely snukkered and about to dove under duvet
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Nov, 2005 02:15 am
I quite like snuck. It's kind of comforting to use, like chomped.
0 Replies
 
goodfielder
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Nov, 2005 04:44 am
Chomped I quite like. I mean it's so onomatopaeic - I probably spelled that wrong and I'm too lazy to look it up. Anyway "chomp" no worries.

MA - I couldn't resist it Very Happy - but thanks for the wind-up blokes - just as well only a few words annoy the heck out of me Razz
0 Replies
 
Goldmund
 
  1  
Reply Sat 5 Nov, 2005 06:29 am
Dear friends,

I have heard «off of» often in England. It is my opinion that it is a common phrase. Smile

It is difficult for a foreigner to understand the offensiveness of this phrase to native speakers. It is perhaps possible for a native speaker to explain it?

Kind regards, Smile

Goldmund
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sat 5 Nov, 2005 07:16 am
Well, it's a redundancy.

e.g.

"Take it off of the table" means the same as "take it off the table".

So, it's unnecessary, and most would say it's wrong. I do.
0 Replies
 
Clary
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Nov, 2005 03:30 am
Hear, hear! (Or perhaps, Hear!)

Mick Jagger - Hey, hey, you get off of my cloud... started the rot. Can we blame the Yanks here?
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Nov, 2005 03:50 am
Sir Michael is a Yank?
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Nov, 2005 07:45 am
I repeat: "Off of" certainly sounds wrong (to me, too). But if you examine its meaning, there is nothing grammatically wrong with it. It's just a bit redundant, is all.
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Nov, 2005 08:57 am
Merry Andrew wrote:
I repeat: "Off of" certainly sounds wrong (to me, too). But if you examine its meaning, there is nothing grammatically wrong with it. It's just a bit redundant, is all.


which is what i said but now Mc Tag and Clary have convinced me is grammatically incorrect too.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Nov, 2005 12:15 pm
Politically incorrect, mebbe . . . grammatically incorrect? I don't think so . . . get offen yer hobby horse, there, Limeys . . .
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Nov, 2005 02:54 pm
hobby horses

what the **** that you colonial (but genial) dimwit










Smile
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Nov, 2005 04:35 pm
Sometimes, these New Town people can't hide their rough social background.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Nov, 2005 05:12 pm
Actually, i've always Steve pulls it off rather well--and in any event, it would be ill-bred of us to take notice of his lack of breeding . . . (for the dimwits in the crowd, the foregoing is not a sexual comment)
0 Replies
 
Nietzsche
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Nov, 2005 05:22 pm
The word "that."

In speaking, it doesn't bother me at all, but it can be removed in 75% of its occurences in writing.

"The fact that you write poorly is easily recognized."
The fact you write poorly is easily recognized.

"I understand that you're upset."
I understand you're upset.
0 Replies
 
 

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