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Do you understand what "Transition overground" means?

 
 
Reply Sun 19 Jun, 2016 03:11 am
Hello!

This question is for those who does not speak Russian. I would like to know whether the sign "Transition overground" of Russain railways is understood by non-Russians. The sign has the English words "Transition overground" and a pictograph of a man climbing stairs. What would this sign mean to you if you found yourself near a foreign railway? It would be interesting to get aswers from the native speakers of English and from those who uses it as a foreign language. I take part in an active discussion of this question in Russia but we have not asked non-Russians yet Smile

Thank you if you answer.
 
Miss L Toad
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Jun, 2016 03:15 am
@Alexander7,
Quote:
The sign has the English words "Transition overground" and a pictograph of a man climbing stairs. What would this sign mean to you if you found yourself near a foreign railway?


It means my train to Vladivostok is leaving from platform 2 in 10 seconds.

I would assume that the sign means "Stairs to Platform
два".

I would further assume that there is another sign showing a pictograph of the considerable carnage involved in crossing the tracks by jumping onto the lines with a big red circle and a line struck through the heart. But I'd still take the short cut.

https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTFBEfU5ddDZnhFhOP-GjoZ_0C26diQcD7QeiD8XDScHVbQ8WUarw
Alexander7
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Jun, 2016 03:38 am
@Miss L Toad,
Thank you very much! Your explanation shows that the sign is not quite clear but your "alamy stock photo" shows approximately what the Russian railways mean Smile
Miss L Toad
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Jun, 2016 03:39 am
Miss L Toad
 
  2  
Reply Sun 19 Jun, 2016 03:46 am
@Alexander7,
The pictograph is clear.

Your name reminds me of a question.

Can anyone tell me who invented the steam engine?
Alexander7
 
  2  
Reply Sun 19 Jun, 2016 04:05 am
@Miss L Toad,
There were many inventors but it seems that some guy from Alexandria was the first: http://www.livescience.com/44186-who-invented-the-steam-engine.html
0 Replies
 
Blickers
 
  3  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2016 10:18 am
@Alexander7,
I also think it means, "Go up the stairs to get to the crossover which takes you to the other side of the track", but I would have to think about it a minute. Maybe, "Upstairs to Track Crossover"?
0 Replies
 
Blickers
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2016 10:25 am
@Miss L Toad,
Miss L Toad:
Thanks for that Seekers gem. One of the more underrated groups of their era.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2016 10:27 am
@Alexander7,
We call that a Pedestrian Overpass in Canada.

http://cdn.xl.thumbs.canstockphoto.com/canstock28583605.jpg
Blickers
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2016 10:36 am
@ehBeth,
Seems to me that "Pedestrians Use Overpass" would be for the people walking on the sidewalk who want to cross over the train tracks. I think Alexander is talking about a sign telling people who are standing on an underground train platform how to cross over to the platform for the train going the other way.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2016 10:42 am
@Blickers,
that's our signage

<shrug>

Canadians seem to understand the meaning.

Blickers
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2016 12:19 pm
@ehBeth,
Not complaining about the signage, just wondering if they post that sign on underground train platforms, as well as on the sidewalks above ground.
0 Replies
 
Sage of Main Street
 
  2  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2016 01:00 pm
@Alexander7,
It's not the way we would say it in English and would confuse people. A transition is not a movement of a person's body, like walking. It's more of a social movement, such as Communism to Capitalism. "Overground" also sounds strange. Both words are literally true, but it's like saying "I elected a new hairstyle."
0 Replies
 
Alexander7
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Jul, 2016 12:50 pm
@Blickers,
Thank you for your answers. I think that the sign "Transition overground" is used at normal railway stations, not necessarily underground. As far as I understand, the sign is for people who are going to use a train very soon or have just got out of a train but the other people who stroll near or through the station can take the sign into account.
0 Replies
 
justoneplayer
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Sep, 2018 01:34 pm
@Miss L Toad,
It means..I think ...that there is a "pedestrian walking bridge" that is not underground....I think it is called "pirijot" in Russian language.
0 Replies
 
 

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