FBM
 
  2  
Reply Sun 4 May, 2014 12:02 am
Interesting science on why we believe such incredible stories:

neologist
 
  1  
Reply Sun 4 May, 2014 12:33 am
@FBM,
Will the video tell us the bible says when you're dead, you're dead?
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sun 4 May, 2014 12:38 am
@neologist,
No, and he didn't even mention this:

Matthew 5:17-20
"Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them. I tell you the truth, until heaven and earth disappear, not the smallest letter, not the least stroke of a pen, will by any means disappear from the Law until everything is accomplished. Anyone who breaks one of the least of these commandments and teaches others to do the same will be called least in the kingdom of heaven, but whoever practices and teaches these commands will be called great in the kingdom of heaven. For I tell you that unless your righteousness surpasses that of the Pharisees and the teachers of the law, you will certainly not enter the kingdom of heaven.
usmankhalid665
 
  1  
Reply Sun 4 May, 2014 12:57 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Do you think science is ultimate truth?
0 Replies
 
usmankhalid665
 
  1  
Reply Sun 4 May, 2014 12:59 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Dear Sir. Just read the Quran. Then post any comment about Quran.
usmankhalid665
 
  0  
Reply Sun 4 May, 2014 01:04 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Dear Sir, how is it possible 0+0+0+0....=1, i mean how this process of universe started from zero. What science says about it?
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sun 4 May, 2014 01:07 pm
@usmankhalid665,
No need to read the whole 'book.' Here's a good summary on Wiki.
Quote:
Quran
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Quran (English pronunciation: /kɔrˈɑːn/[n 1] kor-ahn , Arabic: القرآن‎ al-qur'ān, IPA: [qurˈʔaːn],[n 2] literally meaning "the recitation", also romanised Qur'an or Koran) is the central religious text of Islam, which Muslims believe to be a revelation from God (Arabic: الله‎, Allah).[1] It is widely regarded by Muslims as the finest piece of literature in the Arabic language.[2][3][4][5] Muslims consider the Quran to be the only book that has been protected by God from distortion or corruption.[6] However, some significant textual variations (employing different wordings) and deficiencies in the Arabic script mean the relationship between the text of today's Quran and an original text is unclear.[7] Quranic chapters are called suras and verses are called ayahs.

Muslims believe that the Quran was verbally revealed from God to Muhammad through the angel Gabriel (Jibril), gradually over a period of approximately 23 years, beginning on 22 December 609 CE,[8] when Muhammad was 40, and concluding in 632 CE, the year of his death.[1][9][10] Shortly after Muhammad's death, the Quran was collected by his companions using written Quranic materials and everything that had been memorized of the Quran.[11]

Muslims regard the Quran as the most important miracle of Muhammad, the proof of his prophethood[12] and the culmination of a series of divine messages that started with the messages revealed to Adam and ended with Muhammad. The Quran assumes familiarity with major narratives recounted in the Jewish and Christian scriptures. It summarizes some, dwells at length on others and, in some cases, presents alternative accounts and interpretations of events.[13][14][15] The Quran describes itself as a book of guidance. It sometimes offers detailed accounts of specific historical events, and it often emphasizes the moral significance of an event over its narrative sequence.[16][17] The Quran is used along with the hadith to interpret sharia law.[18] During prayers, the Quran is recited only in Arabic.[19]

Someone who has memorized the entire Quran is called a hafiz. Some Muslims read Quranic ayahs (verses) with elocution, which is often called tajwīd. During the month of Ramadan, Muslims typically complete the recitation of the whole Quran during tarawih prayers.


The similarities between the bible, torah, and Quaran have been proven.
Quote:
Qur'an Bible Torah Comparison
Qur'an / Bible / Torah Comparison
Taken together, the adherents of Judaism, Christianity and Islam comprise over half of humanity. The grim realities of contemporary politics aside, similarities between the three religions vastly outnumber the differences. These similarities include shared perspectives on God, creation, faith, prayer, history, ethics, and contemporary concerns such as war, terrorism, ecology, and so on. The following introduces the main scriptural sources of these three religions – the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and the Qur'an – and then explores what they say on some essential themes that concern them each.


What are you trying to say?
0 Replies
 
neologist
 
  2  
Reply Sun 4 May, 2014 01:27 pm
@FBM,
So why bother? Why not express your thoughts in your own words? External links are a drag.
neologist
 
  0  
Reply Sun 4 May, 2014 01:29 pm
@usmankhalid665,
usmankhalid665 wrote:
Dear Sir. Just read the Quran. Then post any comment about Quran.
I eould, except the Bible contains all we need.
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  2  
Reply Sun 4 May, 2014 03:59 pm
@neologist,
neologist wrote:

So why bother? Why not express your thoughts in your own words? External links are a drag.


*cough* Because referring to the works of experts is relevant and informative. Otherwise, we could all just make up wild stories and claim that they have credibility. Wink
cicerone imposter
 
  3  
Reply Sun 4 May, 2014 04:11 pm
@neologist,
External links, at least credible ones, provide the necessary support for one's opinions.
neologist
 
  0  
Reply Sun 4 May, 2014 04:55 pm
@cicerone imposter,
External links to augment one's opinion might make sense. But as a replacement of one's argument is for me to ignore.

Same with the images containing text. It's a drag trying to respond.
neologist
 
  0  
Reply Sun 4 May, 2014 04:58 pm
@FBM,
FBM wrote:
*cough* Because referring to the works of experts is relevant and informative. Otherwise, we could all just make up wild stories and claim that they have credibility. Wink
Cut and paste is one thing. But watching a video that starts with straw men, red herrings, and hypotheses contrary to fact makes counter argument a tedious chore.
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sun 4 May, 2014 05:10 pm
@neologist,
Please detail the fallacies you see and I'll give them a look. Otherwise, you're just making a baseless accusation.
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sun 4 May, 2014 05:12 pm
@neologist,
neologist wrote:

External links to augment one's opinion might make sense. But as a replacement of one's argument is for me to ignore.

Same with the images containing text. It's a drag trying to respond.


Why would you prefer the statements of an amateur over those of an expert? Because those of an amateur are easier to counter? Those on weak ground prefer to be challenged by a weaker enemy.
neologist
 
  0  
Reply Sun 4 May, 2014 11:15 pm
@FBM,
FBM wrote:
Please detail the fallacies you see and I'll give them a look. Otherwise, you're just making a baseless accusation.
If I ever decide to look at an external link. I'll let you know.
FBM wrote:
Why would you prefer the statements of an amateur over those of an expert? Because those of an amateur are easier to counter? Those on weak ground prefer to be challenged by a weaker enemy.
Just repeat the expert statements in writing. BTW, I'm not the enemy
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 May, 2014 01:09 am
@neologist,
As far as I know, I don't have any enemies. I'm wondering why you're against referencing scholarly sources. They only elevate the level of discourse. Otherwise, it's just people throwing biased speculations around.
neologist
 
  0  
Reply Mon 5 May, 2014 10:32 am
@FBM,
I have no objection to quotes from authoritative sources. Post a link to the source, if you like.

As I recall, the majority of your posts (and mine) are relatively short. We both seem to recognize the futility of long essays, having images of our fellow a2kers with eyes glazing over as they scroll down to the next post. We make our arguments in bits and pieces. When someone presents me with a litany of arguments, I generally take only one or two in response.

The same would apply to outside links. The problem is having to wade through a sometimes convoluted exegesis to find relevant points. For example, a recent post by one of our Islamic members read simply "Read the Quran". Need I say more?

0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 May, 2014 10:34 am
@FBM,
On religion, one just needs to see that humans are prone to create gods. Most cultures have their own gods, and its followers are all based on an accident of birth. They follow the religion of their parents and/or culture.

They believe in their god with their whole heart and soul. They pray to their god more than once a day to remind them that they are the slaves of their religion.

A buddhist believes in his/her god no more than a muslim, christian, or hindu.

That's the way of humans; they build beautiful buildings and monuments for their god(s). One god is no better than any other god; they are the creation of man.

We are the ancestors of primates. It's all part and parcel of human beliefs based on myths of the past.

No more, no less.

0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  0  
Reply Mon 5 May, 2014 10:59 am
@neologist,
neologist wrote:

RexRed wrote:
No one can deny sex is at the very essence of love.
I've known you to be a man of empathy, Rex. That is a quality of principled love. How can sex be the essence of the love you would show to a homeless amputee, for example?


For most of my life I have had my ideas of love and sex defined by religion.

The logical alternative is to define love and sex like the Greeks or perhaps Romans.

What if sex is actually defined best like the Hindus or some other "culture"? Once again we have Christians trying to tell the world that we obtained sexual morality in 2000 years... These are the same people who think the universe is 6000 years old. And we are going to listen to these same people on the origin of morality and what sexuality is?

I am just saying that maybe the "love" that two consenting adults share is a more sacred thing than the way religion portrays it. As I have said before that LGBT love it is a sacred rite.

American Indians had consideration for LGBT people in their ancient culture. I believe American Indians referred to LGBT people as "two spirits". See homosexuality existed before but European culture and religion was too puritanical. That is like saying there are no gays in Iran...

"Some" religions try and used demons to condemn same sex couples.

I think Neo you like to remind people of the "license to sin". I say the greatest sin is insulting the love of two consenting adults with bigotry, homophobia and intolerance. Holding this hate towards LGBT people for years deep inside one's being, what kind of demon is that? Is that love?

I see time and again religious people and over the years they do not seem to change, they just keep the same hate inside until it consumes them and all that they stand for. They will have to play out some sort of public display to fulfill their own abhorrent religious behavior.

Is this the license you speak of Neo?

What license has religion used to play out its own sin against LGBT people?
 

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