28
   

Republican Senate Nominee: "Legitimate" rape victims don't get pregnant

 
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2012 01:45 pm
@firefly,
Real conservatives who really believes that government should have "no" intrusion into private lives doesn't exist. Otherwise, they would be telling their leaders to lay off. Their silence means they approve of what the conservative leadership are doing, and will follow that up with their votes.

They approve of this reversal of conservative beliefs. They are no longer "real" conservatives, but an extremist organization that only wants total control of everything - including taxation of the rich and women's bodies.

When did conservatism disappear?
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2012 02:34 pm
While all and every male of Republican establishment has made comments, the only comment -as far as I found out- came by Palin: “Bless his heart, I don’t want to pile on Todd Akin, because in some respects I understand what he’s trying to say here, in standing on principle.” (On FoxNews)

Nothing rape victims and abortion by Palin. Aren't there any women in Republic Party (Rice?) or is it a men's job to have an opinion here, I wonder.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2012 02:55 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:
I understand what he’s trying to say here, in standing on principle.” (On FoxNews)


Is she saying that whatever someone's principles, it is an admirable thing if they stand by them? Was it admirable for that political writer to stand by his?
0 Replies
 
IRFRANK
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2012 03:06 pm
@parados,
Quote:
It was too much regulation that caused it. We just need to let the markets work without regulation.

Oh.. wait.. Bush was against regulation.



Wow. So we would have been better off if we hadn't bailed out the banks and Detroit? How high do you think unemployment would have been? Or, would still be?

The problem with unrestrained pure capitalism is it's peaks and valleys are so extreme. The rich get richer during the peaks and they don't suffer during the valleys. They only make $5 mil a year instead of $50 mil. The working class gets thrown in the gutter. The valleys would be very costly and recovery would not be certain. The resulting long term depression would not be good for anyone.

To think that unrestrained capitalism would result in some kind of even sustained growth is laughable and you will not find any economist that believes that.

Your simplistic view of economics is wrong.


RABEL222
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2012 03:07 pm
@parados,
Not entirely correct. If you catch field corn at the right time its quite good. Fried, fricasseed or boiled.
0 Replies
 
IRFRANK
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2012 03:07 pm
@Joe Nation,
Quote:
secrete a secret secretion


cool

Joe ( a firm grasp ) Nation
0 Replies
 
RABEL222
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2012 03:08 pm
@parados,
Lower the tax rate on the 1%.
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  2  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2012 03:09 pm
@IRFRANK,
I think you missed the sarcasm.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2012 03:12 pm
@IRFRANK,
The bank bailout was a necessity; for any economy to work. Without banks, all economies would fail. Just think of all the credit card transactions that happens in one minute around the world.

Obama was spot on in helping out Detroit which ended up saving tens of thousands of jobs; not only in Detroit, but all over the world where their cars are sold and maintained.

0 Replies
 
IRFRANK
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2012 03:15 pm
@DrewDad,
Quote:
I think you missed the sarcasm.


Sorry , then. It hit a hot button.
0 Replies
 
mysteryman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2012 04:13 pm
@cicerone imposter,
This isn't true.
Many conservatives do complain to our elected representatives, but it doesn't mean that they listen to us.

Its interesting to see you lump all conservatives like that, even when you know you are wrong.
parados
 
  3  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2012 04:16 pm
@IRFRANK,
Quote:

Your simplistic view of economics is wrong.


How do you feel about my sarcasm?
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  3  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2012 04:20 pm
@mysteryman,
Yea, I do that most of the time; sue me!

What you don't "catch" is that most conservatives follow in lock-step with what their leadership is doing, and we don't hear about your complaints to your leadership.

If I don't like something about what Obama has done or is doing, I let him know by email. Yes, his responses are always, "thank you," but they never respond to the issues I address in them.

You do know about a) voter suppressioin, b) taking away women's rights to abortion and health care, and c) giving more tax breaks to the rich.

Why aren't more of you sounding off if you disagree with the direction your party is going?

gungasnake
 
  0  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2012 06:18 pm
@IRFRANK,
Quote:
Wow. So we would have been better off if we hadn't bailed out the banks and Detroit? How high do you think unemployment would have been? Or, would still be?


Bankruptcy procedures are specifically designed to PREVENT companies shutting down, not cause them to shut down. The difference is that taxpayers and bond holders don't get totally fucked the way we've seen with all of Bork Obunga's too-big-to-fail ****.
Rockhead
 
  3  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2012 06:20 pm
@gungasnake,
that was begun by the bushy...
0 Replies
 
mysteryman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2012 06:34 pm
@cicerone imposter,
So then you have no problem with being lumped into the same group as the loony left, the ones that are the embarrassment to democrats and liberals?

And I do write and call my elected reps when I have something to say, a criticism or a compliment.
I just don't feel the need to brag about to others.
However, if it will make you feel better, I will start bragging about it to you.

Btw, since I don't belong to either party, "my party" isn't going in any direction.

chai2
 
  6  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2012 07:04 pm
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/php/galleries/image.php/935/1/1.jpg
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2012 07:40 pm
Senator McCaskill I hear is one of his biggest supporter to remain in the race against her.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10000872396390444358404577604992035831270.html?mod=googlenews_wsj


.By DOUGLAS BELKIN

ST. LOUIS—After enduring a 48-hour shellacking by local and national Republican politicians, who asked him to quit his bid for the U.S. Senate, Rep. Todd Akin fanned the flames of a grass-roots backlash from his evangelical base Wednesday in hopes that he could change the narrative of his troubled campaign.

Mr. Akin, attacking "the party bosses" who are calling for him to pull out and condemning the "liberal media" for twisting his words, went on national television Wednesday morning and defiantly vowed to stay in the race. At the same time, his surrogates in Missouri began to spin scenarios in which he could beat incumbent Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill in November.

"This has resulted in faster unification of the grass roots than we would have otherwise seen," said Kerry Messer, president of Missouri Family Network, which describes itself as a pro-family lobbying organization. "This is about the mainstream media jumping on a conservative who said something wrong, and distorting that. People can see for themselves what he said that is making them angry, and it's bringing them together."

Rep. Todd Akin, the embattled Missouri GOP Senate candidate, reiterated his intent to stay in the race Tuesday, even as Republicans continued to raise the pressure on him to step aside. Naftali Bendavid has details on The News Hub. Photo: AP.
.Enlarge Image

CloseSt. Louis Post-Dispatch/Associated Press

The comment drew condemnation from President Barack Obama and spurred presumptive presidential GOP nominee Mitt Romney, his running mate, Paul Ryan, and a host of Republican governors to ask Mr. Akin to withdraw his candidacy. Karl Rove's American Crossroads super PAC and other heavyweights withdrew plans to run ads on his behalf.

Instead of stepping aside, Mr. Akin has apologized for his "one wrong word" and used the castigation from the political establishment as fuel to fire up antiabortion Christian conservatives who have carried him to victory across his career.

"For him to win, he has to make this a national crusade," said Dave Robertson, professor of political science at University of Missouri-St. Louis. "He has to bridge this period with small donations from around the country until the super PACs think he can win again and come back."

Mr. Akin appears to be doing his best to tap the national base of antiabortion activists. On his website, a banner reads: "I am pro life and I stand with Todd Akin." In another corner, the site asks supporters to "chip in if you believe party bosses shouldn't trump the votes of the people of Missouri."

Outsiders telling Mr. Akin to step down, seeming to dictate whom Missourians can and can't vote for, is beginning to grate on some people here.

At the Jefferson County Republican Central Committee meeting Tuesday, many attendees said they would have preferred Mr. Romney to have remained quiet on the issue until it is resolved.

"We're called the Show Me State for a very good reason," said Janet Engelbach, committee president. "You'll have to show the people of Missouri a really good reason for making Todd Akin step aside."

Mr. Akin won Jefferson County, one of the most populous in the state, in the recent Senate primary. The local GOP committee members overwhelmingly stood by him Tuesday, said Ms. Engelbach—not necessarily because they agree with what he said, she explained, but because "he won the primary fair and square."

Mr. Akin, 65 years old, is a canny politician who knows well the contours of his constituency and has benefited from a few well-timed strokes of luck across his career. Despite standing to the right of the majority of his constituents in suburban St. Louis, he has been elected to six terms in the U.S. House.

His only close race was his first primary in 2000, when his competitors split the moderate vote and allowed him to squeak through to victory. "My base will show up in earthquakes," he said at the time. He went on to an easy win in the general election in a district that leans Republican and hasn't had a close call since.

He bet on that base again this month when he bested a trio of conservative Republicans in a hard-fought primary in which he was outspent. Establishment Republicans argued he was too far to the right to win a statewide vote. Mr. Akin's television ads blended evangelical catchphrases and religious themes aimed at Christian conservatives.

Aiding him on the ticket was a referendum defending public prayer that got more votes than all of the senatorial candidates combined, Mr. Robertson said.

Now, Mr. Akin needs those supporters to sustain him again as he struggles to turn the narrative from whether he will quit to how he can defeat Ms. McCaskill. His surrogates are doing their best to make that happen.

"He absolutely can still beat her," said John Putnam, the Missouri coordinator of the Tea Party Patriots and a supporter. "His campaign website crashed because so many people are coming on board to support him. When it comes down to a choice of a Republican or McCaskill, the
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2012 07:49 pm
Senator McCaskill to Akin keep in there...........

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/OTUS/todd-akin-defended-democratic-rival-claire-mccaskill/story?id=17048232

Earlier today, Akin gained an unlikely ally in the form of Democratic rival Sen. Claire McCaskill.

McCaskill, who is trailing Akin in the polls, said that Republican leaders should not be trying to overturn the results of the Republican primary that made Akin their candidate.

"Elections are sacred," McCaskill told St. Louis Fox affiliate KTVS. "There was an election, so I think the voters of Missouri should be respected, not have some big-wig, fancy people from Washington come in here and threaten him that he's got to drop out."

The National Republican Senate Committee questioned McCaskill's motives.

"It should not be lost on anyone that some of the only voices not calling for Congressman Akin to do the right thing and step aside are Claire McCaskill and the leaders of the pro-abortion movement," they said in a statement. "Senator McCaskill knows that the only way she wins re-election is if Todd Akin is her opponent in November."

0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2012 08:02 pm
@mysteryman,
How many times do I have to tell you, I'm not a liberal. I'm a moderate. Tatoo that into your brain if you have one!
 

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