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NRA POLICY ON SELF DEFENSE LAWS

 
 
Reply Tue 1 May, 2012 06:05 pm

The National Rifle Association always has and always will advocate
the passage and preservation of self-defense laws.

The alternative leaves the innocent in danger.

The vast majority of states do not impose a “duty to retreat”
and most Americans support laws that clarify that Common Law,
common-sense right. It empowers lawful people to defend themselves,
and deters would-be murderers, rapists and robbers.

It’s a natural right. No law “gives” it or can take it away. It’s yours.

It works and its only alternative – the idea that distant, disinterested
third parties can dictate after the fact that “you must retreat” – will never
be accepted by the American people.

For these reasons, the National Rifle Association will work to protect
self-defense laws on the books and advocate for their passage in
those states that do not fully respect this fundamental right.

--NRA--

 
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 2 May, 2012 06:08 am
@OmSigDAVID,
wha dya think about growing onions near tomatoes?
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 May, 2012 06:12 am
@farmerman,
We never had a problem with that. Why, what's wrong with that?
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 May, 2012 06:14 am
@farmerman,
I think it makes sense, but planting strawberries with your onions is even better.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 2 May, 2012 06:16 am
@Setanta,
Im a bit worried whether there are " anti-companion" issues even though the charts dont seem to spell out antagonistic tendencies between allenaceous and solinaceous veggies.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 May, 2012 06:19 am
@farmerman,
Don't be.

Quote:
ONIONS: Planting chamomile and summer savory with onions improves their flavor. Other companions are carrot, leek, beets, kohlrabi, strawberries, brassicas, dill, lettuce and tomatoes. Intercropping onions and leeks with your carrots confuses the carrot and onion flies! Onions planted with strawberries help the berries fight disease. Keep onions away from peas and asparagus
.

http://www.ghorganics.com/page2.html

0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Wed 2 May, 2012 06:23 am
@farmerman,
We had long rows of onions running the length of the garden (half-acre, so really long rows) with the temater plants at the side on one end. We could not possibly have used all the termaters from a full row of them, so we had three plants, set about 18" apart, and the rest of that row was devoted to my prize-winning cukes.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 May, 2012 06:44 am
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
wha dya think about growing onions near tomatoes?
I think its off-topic.
Other than that, I have no opinion. I 'm not much of a gardener.





David
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 May, 2012 09:18 am
@OmSigDAVID,
I was gonna award Izzy the red star with set as a back-up. But then I discovered that this thread was about something else. Smile
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 May, 2012 09:39 am
@farmerman,
What . . . fruit?
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 May, 2012 10:20 am
@OmSigDAVID,
I think the off-topic has become the on-topic, and you need to go with the flow. Have you ever considered viticulture? Contact with the soil is very good for one's wellbeing. I could do with someone to talk about my vine with. I've got my first lot of wine brewing from last year, and I'm going to be bottling it soon.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 May, 2012 10:22 am
@farmerman,
I've just planted some asparagus, so I won't be growing onions this year. I will try some peas though.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 May, 2012 03:37 pm
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:
I think the off-topic has become the on-topic,
and you need to go with the flow. Have you ever considered viticulture?
No. Alcohol does not play much of a part in my life.
Sometimes I drink in restaurants,
but it seldom occurs to me to keep any at home.


izzythepush wrote:
Contact with the soil is very good for one's wellbeing.
I 'm familiar with that turn of mind.
I 've had several relatives who felt that way.
I even had an uncle who, having professional gardiners,
he insisted on participating in gardening in the heat of Arizona.
I 'd rather keep my hands clean.



izzythepush wrote:
I could do with someone to talk about my vine with.
I've got my first lot of wine brewing from last year, and I'm going to be bottling it soon.
I enjoy conversing with u,
but my advice qua raising grapes 'd be devoid of merit.





David
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 May, 2012 05:13 pm
@izzythepush,
Tell Dave that I think hes confusing viticulture with viniculture. Be that as it may, Ive planted my tomatoes . I had to start a new bed because of thieving chickens. SO I moved em next to my onions and then I planted basil around it all.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 May, 2012 02:12 am
@farmerman,
For me it's hard to tell the two apart. My vines are supposedly taken from cuttings from a famous vine at Hampton Court, so they should be suited to this climate, but all the grapes are sour. They're not much good for anything else.

I've got foxgloves growing in my strawberry patch, they should be slightly beneficial.

http://www.transitionnetwork.org/sites/default/files/assets/Foxgloves.jpg

They grow wild round here.
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 May, 2012 02:33 am
@farmerman,
Planting tomatoes this early, fm? Can you do that in your part of Penna.? When I lived in New Hampshire, I'd never dare plant toms until after Memorial Day. (Except for starters indoors, of course.) We'd still get the occasional killing frost in the month of May up there. And I was in the extreme southern part of NH, mind you. Different story where I am now, of course.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 May, 2012 02:44 am
@Lustig Andrei,
I'm in Hampshire, the old one, if that means anything.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 May, 2012 03:40 am
@izzythepush,
we put our tomatoes into the garden around mothers day around here.Wewill get an occasional cold ight but no real frosts anymore.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 May, 2012 05:43 am
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
Tell Dave that I think hes confusing viticulture with viniculture.
No, farmer. I did not recognize the word
and therefore, I looked it up. Dictionary.com sets forth:

viticulture [vit-i-kuhl-cher]  
noun
1. the culture or cultivation of grapevines; grape-growing.
2. the study or science of grapes and their culture.

I accepted that definition and I was referring to that.






farmerman wrote:
Be that as it may, Ive planted my tomatoes.
Thay can be dangerous; their seeds.
In 1986, I awoke 1 nite in pain. I suspected the possibility
of appendicitis. It turned out to be diverticulitis,
either of which can afflict u with lethal peritonitis.

My physician advised against ingesting any particulates, e.g. seeds,
because, as u age, u get progressively more diverticular sacs
in your intestines. An alien particle can cause inflamation,
worthy of being avoided. The moral of the story is:
the older u get, the farther u shud stay away from tomatos.

Decency requires u to WARN your chickons
of this menace to their contentment & well-being.





David

farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 May, 2012 06:01 am
@OmSigDAVID,
vegetables are able to defeat an assailant with a gun.
SO your garden should always have several defensive and offensive varietals
 

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