16
   

about the drought

 
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 May, 2011 07:03 pm
Quote:
Well, pines do; how much pines vary I don't know

the extent of a conifer tap root is mostly dependant on soil type and moisture. trees are basically lazy and the roots grow where its easy and where soil moisture and oxygen are present. Often they will follow small cracks in soil or subsoil rock.
In any case, as i said, tap roots have little function when it comes to absorbing water. Tap roots mainly store and carry water. You really only need to water into the top 6 - 12 inches of soil and around the drip line.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 May, 2011 07:03 pm
It is intimidating to consider topping the trees, dadpad. 60 feet is rather high and I don't bounce when I fall down. I think trying to use our household water to keep them alive will be my best bet. The soil is sandy. I can bring home a post hole digger tomorrow and get started. I am extremely weary this evening, plus it is almost dark. No need to do much today, Thanks for giving me much to think about.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 May, 2011 07:04 pm
@dadpad,
That's good to know.
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 May, 2011 07:23 pm
@edgarblythe,
Hope it goes well for you.
Ask if you need more info from me.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 May, 2011 07:23 pm
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee307/edgarblythe/one002.jpg
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee307/edgarblythe/one006.jpg
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee307/edgarblythe/one007.jpg
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee307/edgarblythe/one009.jpg
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 May, 2011 07:24 pm
I didn't show the trees less than five feet from the back wall.
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 May, 2011 07:39 pm
@edgarblythe,
what drought?
theres green stuff everywhere. Even the grass is green.

Mulch sandy soil to reduce water evaporating and to hold the water in the area instead of draining away through the sand.
When you dig you post holes see if you can get some water absorbing composted type material into the botom of the holes. Maybe go an extra foot or so and fill that with well broken down orgainc matter.

My mother used the plastic pipe into the ground trick but cut some horizontal slits into the pipes at variouse levels so that some small amount of the water drained at several levels. I dont really know if that made a difference but it seems like an idea worth following up.
Others I know left a meter (3 feet) of pipe sticking up out of the ground so that more water could be put in at each watering.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 May, 2011 07:44 pm
@dadpad,
Sure, it's green. But, pines can be green this week and start turning brown very quickly. We have all been watering all along. But the notice to cut back the watering came Saturday.
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 May, 2011 10:37 pm
@edgarblythe,
Those trees are huge! Very pretty area! Hope you'll be able to save them.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 May, 2011 04:27 am
@edgarblythe,
It really puts my problems into place. We've had a very dry April and I was concerned that my cherry and apple trees would lose a lot of their fruit. I've been using up the old washing up water to keep them plump. I've never had to face the prospect of a tree dying though, and we've just had quite a bit of rain in the last few days. I hope you can save them though. We need more trees.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 May, 2011 04:42 am
My neighbor and I got together and had men cut down the biggest one of them, because, after hurricane Ike, a tree cutter told her it was the greatest threat to crush one of our homes. It was huge, all the way up to a split in the trunk, about forty feet up there and then it looked like two twenty foot trees were sitting on top.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 May, 2011 09:48 am
@edgarblythe,
Silly guys! Just cut out manageable to handle 3 or 4 foot sections from the bottom until the top is closer to the ground. Then you can fall that piece with no danger.
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 May, 2011 09:56 am
Agree with others here re: shower water bucket. You can get 10 or 20 gallons really quickly, and 2-3 of those a month will mean life or death for your trees.

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 May, 2011 08:14 pm
@edgarblythe,
Quote:
We are in the worst drought since records started being kept.

That sounds awfully familiar, edgar.
Good luck, I hope your drought doesn't go on for as long as ours here.
I know you're more interested in your trees than the survival of your garden, but I'm posting this information (to add to dadpad's & Butrflynet's posts) on grey water for anyone else who might be interested. Particularly the recommendations on cleaners & detergents in grey water. We found we had to change ours to brands which were more user friendly.

Quote:
Practical suggestions for safe garden use
* Use a coarse filter to reduce the amounts of solids in your greywater. Otherwise, your plants will suffer from clogged soil.
* Ingredients in cleaners and detergents that can harm or kill plants include total salts, sodium, chloride and boron. Check product labels carefully.
* Evidence suggests that microbes from greywater have higher survival rates on the topsoil. All irrigation should be located sub-soil. Never hose, spray or mist untreated greywater.
* You may need to reduce the amount of fertiliser you use (note that native plants don’t like nutrients – plant selection could be critical for nutrients and soil moisture levels). Consult with your local nursery for further information.
* Regularly water your garden with fresh water to help prevent the build-up of salts in your soil.

http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Grey_water_-_recycling_water_at_home

In Victoria (Oz) a new medical condition called "bucket back" was identified during the worst of our drought, from carting all those buckets of grey water from house to garden. I think I might have had it for a while there. Smile
I now have acquired something like 10 buckets, from some extremely dry summers.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 May, 2011 04:41 am
I already got bucket back at work, olga. Thanks for the information.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 May, 2011 05:46 am
@edgarblythe,
You already have bucket back, edgar?
Welcome to the club! Wink

A lot of our nature strips (the grass areas between footpaths & roads) have trees planted in them. Our local council currently has an "adopt a tree" program going, where residents look after the trees outside their own properties. So I guess there's still a need for care & attention, despite the worst of the drought being (temporarily, at least) over.

0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 May, 2011 12:09 pm
I had been unconcerned about how much water we were wasting, before now. Now that I am collecting it, it's amazing.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 May, 2011 02:55 pm
They have predicted 60% rain probability for tomorrow. First good chance all year. I can't recall the last time we had any.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 May, 2011 02:58 pm
@edgarblythe,
Good, hope it happens..
We have some dark clouds here, and I just heard a thunder rumble. We'll see,
sometimes the rain skips around.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 May, 2011 03:03 pm
I have been placing containers in strategic spots to be filled.
 

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