25
   

North Korea: What to do?

 
 
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Sun 19 Dec, 2010 09:38 pm
@FBM,
Get your camera ready, you don't want to miss any blood and gore. Shots like those will really establish your street creds back home. You certainly don't want to have to rely on your knowledge of English grammar.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Dec, 2010 09:40 pm
@FBM,
I suppose the North will take it as a provocation, if not an outright invasion.
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Dec, 2010 09:43 pm
@roger,
Oh, yeah. They've made that very clear.
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Dec, 2010 10:09 pm
Visibility still pretty limited around here. I'm not far from the west coast.

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb192/DinahFyre/Photo101220_2.jpg
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Dec, 2010 10:19 pm
How many hours before it starts?
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Dec, 2010 10:27 pm
@edgarblythe,
Any time, as soon as the fog lets up. If it does.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Dec, 2010 10:28 pm
@FBM,
<listening>
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Dec, 2010 11:08 pm
@ossobuco,
At 2:00, there was announcement that it would start soon. It's 2:08 here.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Dec, 2010 11:31 pm
@FBM,
Time for sleep here. Good luck..
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Dec, 2010 11:33 pm
@ossobuco,
Thanks. Eh. Just as I clicked here, the news said it has started.
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Dec, 2010 12:32 am
They announced that the firing drill has just ended. If the North is going to respond, this is the most likely time, according to some expert on TV.
failures art
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Dec, 2010 12:37 am
Thanks for the updates FBM.

A
R
T
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Dec, 2010 12:40 am
@failures art,
No sweat, Art. I can't be pried from my TV and PC at the moment, anyway. I'm thinking NK may just take this bruise to their pride and respond indirectly later.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Dec, 2010 09:44 am
Quote:
YEONPYEONG ISLAND, South Korea – North Korea backed off threats to retaliate against South Korea for military drills Monday and reportedly offered concessions on its nuclear program — signs it was looking to lower the temperature on the Korean peninsula after weeks of soaring tensions.

But Pyongyang has feinted toward conciliation before and failed to follow through.

The North's gestures came after South Korea launched fighter jets, evacuated hundreds of residents near its tense land border with the North and sent residents of islands near disputed waters into underground bunkers in case Pyongyang followed through on its vow to attack over the drills.

"It appears that deterrence has been restored," said Daniel Pinkston, Seoul-based analyst with the International Crisis Group think tank. "The North Koreans only understand force or show of force."

This is not the first time that the North has taken the international community down this road. The North has previously been accused of using a mix of aggression and conciliatory gestures to force international negotiations that usually net it much-needed aid. Real progress, meanwhile, on efforts to rid the North of its nuclear weapons programs has been rare.... More
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  2  
Reply Mon 20 Dec, 2010 11:24 am
Trying to predict what the North Koreans will do is like trying to predict which way a butterfly will turn.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Dec, 2010 01:13 pm
@FBM,
FBM wrote:

They announced that the firing drill has just ended. If the North is going to respond, this is the most likely time, according to some expert on TV.

It looks to me as though NK prefers isolated attacks against the unwary. Which leads me to think they will wait until this is all but forgotten before they act again.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Dec, 2010 02:36 pm
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

FBM wrote:

They announced that the firing drill has just ended. If the North is going to respond, this is the most likely time, according to some expert on TV.

It looks to me as though NK prefers isolated attacks against the unwary. Which leads me to think they will wait until this is all but forgotten before they act again.


And no one will have any better of an idea how to respond than they did to the latest one.
JTT
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 20 Dec, 2010 04:25 pm
KOREA: WHAT TO DO

This tells any sensible person what should be done. Finn, FBM and you other war mongers/war crimes apologists, carry on. With people like you helping, Korea should see another 4 or 5 million people slaughtered in the not too distant future.

Quote:

United States War Crimes

by Lenora Foerstel and Brian Willson


Korea:1943-1953

On August 15,1945, the Korean people, devastated and impoverished by years of brutality from Japanese occupation forces, openly celebrated their liberation and immediately formed the Committee for the Preparation of Korean Independence (CKPI). By August 28, 1945, all Korean provinces on the entire Peninsula had established local people's democratic committees, and on September 6, delegates from throughout Korea, north and south, created the Korean People's Republic (KPR). On September 7, the day after the creation of the KPR, General Douglas MacArthur, commander of the victorious Allied powers in the Pacific, formally issued a proclamation addressed "To the People of Korea." The proclamation announced that forces under his command "will today occupy the Territory of Korea south of 38 degrees north latitude."

The first advance party of U.S. units, the 17th Regiment of the 7th Infantry Division, actually began arriving at Inchon on September 5th, two days before MacArthur's occupation declaration. The bulk of the US occupation forces began unloading from twenty-one Navy ships (including five destroyers) on September 8 through the port at Inchon under the command of Lieutenant General John Reed Hodge. Hundreds of black-coated armed Japanese police on horseback, still under the direction of Japanese Governor-General Abe Noabuyki, kept angry Korean crowds away from the disembarking US soldiers.

On the morning of September 9, General Hodge announced that Governor-General Abe would continue to function with all his Japanese and Korean personnel. Within a few weeks there were 25,000 American troops and members of "civil service teams" in the country. Ultimately the number of US troops in southern Korea reached 72,000. Though the Koreans were officially characterized as a "semi-friendly, liberated" people, General Hodge regrettably instructed his own officers that Korea "was an enemy of the United States...subject to the provisions and the terms of the surrender."

Tragically and ironically, the Korean people, citizens of the victim-nation, had become enemies, while the defeated Japanese, who had been the illegal aggressors, served as occupiers in alliance with the United States. Indeed, Korea was burdened with the very occupation originally intended for Japan, which became the recipient of massive U.S. aid and reconstruction in the post-war period. Japan remains, to this day, America=s forward military base affording protection and intelligence for its "interests" in the Asia-Pacific region.

Seventy-three-year-old Syngman Rhee was elected President of ASouth [email protected] on May 10,1948 in an election boycotted by virtually all Koreans except the elite KDP and Rhee's own right -wing political groups. This event, historically sealing a politically divided Korea, provoked what became known at the Cheju massacre, in which as many as 70,000 residents of the southern island of Cheju were ruthlessly murdered during a single year by Rhee's paramilitary forces under the oversight of U.S. officers. Rhee took office as President on August 15 and the Republic of Korea (ROK) was formally declared. In response, three-and -a-half weeks later (on September 9, 1948), the people of northern Korea grudgingly created their own separate government, the Democratic People's's Republic of Korea (DPRK), with Kim II Sung as its premier.

Korea was now clearly and tragically split in two. Kim Il Sung had survived as a guerrilla fighter against the Japanese occupation in both China and Korea since 1932 when he was twenty years old. He was thirty-three when he returned to Pyongyang in October 1945 to begin the hoped-for era of rebuilding a united Korea free of foreign domination, and three years later, on September 9, 1948, he became North Korea's first premier. The Rhee/U.S. forces escalated their ruthless campaign of cleansing the south of dissidents, identifying as a suspected "communist" anyone who opposed the Rhee regime, publicly or privately. In reality, most participants or believers in the popular movement in the south were socialists unaffiliated with outside "communist" organizations.

As the repression intensified, however, alliances with popular movements in the north, including communist organizations, increased. The Cheju insurgency was crushed by August 1949, but on the mainland, guerrilla warfare continued in most provinces until 1959-51. In the eyes of the commander of US military forces in Korea, General Hodge, and new "President" Syngman Rhee, virtually any Korean who had not publicly professed his allegiance to Rhee was considered a "communist" traitor. As a result, massive numbers of farmers, villagers and urban residents were systematically rounded up in rural areas, villages and cities throughout South Korea. Captives were regularly tortured to extract names of others. Thousands were imprisoned and even more thousands forced to dig mass graves before being ordered into them and shot by fellow Koreans, often under the watch of U.S. troops.

The introduction of U.S./UN military forces on June 26,1950 occurred with no American understanding (except by a few astute observers such as journalist I.F Stone) that in fact they were entering an ongoing revolutionary civil war waged by indigenous Koreans seeking genuine independence after five years of U.S. interference. The American occupation simply fueled Korean passions even more while creating further divisions among them.

In the Autumn of 1950, when U.S. forces were in retreat in North Korea, General Douglas MacArthur offered all air forces under his command to destroy "every means of communication, every installation, factory, city and village " from the Yalu River, forming the border between North Korea and China, south to the battle line. The massive saturation bombing conducted throughout the war, including napalm, incendiary, and fragmentation bombs, left scorched cities and villages in total ruins. As in World War II, the U.S. strategic bombing campaign brought mass destruction and shockingly heavy civilian casualties. Such tactics were in clear violation of the Nuremburg Charter, which had, ironically, been created after World War II, largely due to pressure from the U.S. The Nuremburg Tribunal defined "the wanton destruction of cities, towns or villages" to be a war crime and declared that Ainhumane acts against any civilian population" were a crime against humanity.

From that fateful day on September 8, 1945 to the present, a period of 56 years, U.S. military forces (currently numbering 37,000 positioned at 100 installations) have maintained a continuous occupation in the south supporting de facto U.S. rule over the political, economic and military life of a needlessly divided Korea. This often brutal occupation and the persistent U.S. support for the repressive policies of dictatorial puppets continues to be the single greatest obstacle to peace in Korea, preventing the inevitable reunification of the Korean Peninsula.

Until 1994, all of the hundreds of thousands of South Korean defense forces operated under direct U.S. command. Even today, although integrated into the Combined Forces Command (CFC), these forces automatically revert to direct US control when the US military commander in Korea determines that there is a state of war.

http://www.globalresearch.ca/articles/FOE201A.html
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Dec, 2010 05:19 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
True, true. I doubt many in the South are taking this as a genuine expression of a desire to get along peacefully. The ordinary citizen will go about his/her daily life, but the military will be extra vigilant for some time, I'm sure.

It's curious how they simultaneously announced that they'd accept IAEA inspectors back and make a couple of other promising statements. Hmm. They're hard to figure, eh?
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Dec, 2010 05:24 pm
@FBM,
Do you think that China &/or Russia convinced them to back off?
 

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