25
   

North Korea: What to do?

 
 
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 07:01 pm
@FBM,
Interesting articles, FBM, from your newspapers. Can you tell us a bit about the press in SK? Where, traditionally, are these papers you quoted positioned? Are there news outlets more supportive of your President?
Ionus
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 09:38 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Quote:
We presently find ourselves in a situation that is similar in principle
to that when the nazis began becoming aggressive, regardless of the Treaty of Versailles.
We've been in that situation ever since the Chinese fought us to a standstill. They eventually signed a ceasefire not a peace agreement because they realised the west would not give up. I believe they now think we are weak.

As a point of interest, the original UN agreement calls for the return of its forces if the ceasefire should be violated. I cant count the number of times it has been violated and nothing has happened.
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 09:58 pm
@realjohnboy,
The Chosun Ilbo is the most conservative, right-wing paper. The Joong-ang Ilbo is more centrist, but maybe a little right-leaning. I don't think I've linked to any of the others, but here's a link to probably the most left-wing paper: http://english.hani.co.kr/kisa/section-014000000/home01.html. There's no appreciable censorship in newspapers, as far as I can tell. People are free to say whatever they like about the current admin and the Prez in particular.

TV is a different matter. The Prez and his consorts have bought up most of the broadcasting stations and heavily influences their content. That's been a big bone of contention around here since not too long after he took office.
0 Replies
 
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 10:02 pm
@realjohnboy,
Just bookmarking. Thanks FBM for giving us a local perspective. Is it someone in the old guard paint KJU into the same corner as his father, or was it an attempt to mobilise nationalism behind him?

Our news is coming from the US and is saying that NK is currently NOT mobilised for an invasion and that the attacks appear to be isolated. Fingers crossed.

For years now China has been dealing with a Korean refugee problem from the north. I wonder just how good that relationship is.
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 10:28 pm
@hingehead,
I read in one of the papers yesterday that not only had unusual troop movements been spotted in the area before the attacks, KJI and his heir-apparent, KJU, had actually visited that area in the days before the attack..

Of course, if it's true that they visited the area, the troop movements could simply be related to that visit, not necessarily getting ready for an attack. I haven't heard of any other signs of the North enhancing their defenses or anything of the sort, though. Now that you mention it, I haven't seen any reports on what spy planes and satellites have been picking up in the past day or two.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Nov, 2010 03:09 am
Bookmarking & posting a recent update:

Quote:

China opposes 'provocative' Korean attacks
Updated 1 hour 37 minutes ago

China has voiced its opposition to the "provocative military acts" on the Korean peninsula after the North escalated tensions by shelling the South earlier this week.

Officials in Beijing have also criticised plans for a US-South Korean joint naval exercise in response to the North's deadly artillery barrage on the island of Yeonpyeong on Tuesday. ...<cont>


http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/11/25/3076577.htm
0 Replies
 
willo1945
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Nov, 2010 03:27 am
@FBM,
First came across this at 'supaswap-news.com' in my view the posturing is a pre cursor to change at the top in NK. They seem to think this will strengthen the 'son's' reputation with the military
eurocelticyankee
 
  4  
Reply Thu 25 Nov, 2010 03:33 am
@OmSigDAVID,
Quote:
this is a job for nuclear warfare, while it is still viable.



Quote:
We shoud not let things get out of hand,


Weird
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Nov, 2010 04:21 am
@willo1945,
Yeah, that's emerging as the most likely explanation. Six months ago, hardly anyone - including in NK - had even heard the younger Kim's name. Next thing you know, he's a 4-star general despite having no military background. Then, a couple of weeks ago, NK published a photo showing KJU sitting immediately at KJI's left side with senior military figures standing behind, a tacit message that he was second in command. I think just in the last week or so an official in the North publically mentioned KJU's name in context with succession.

But KJU is still unknown even to NKoreans, so, yeah, he needs to gain some street cred somehow. This is the NK 'legend-building' method, seems.

The big question is whether or not the real military will accept KJU, a 28-y.o. with no experience, as their Commander-in-Chief, so to speak. In Confucian countries, age and tenure determine rank as much or more than actual accomplishment (of which KJU has none, anyway).
Ionus
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Nov, 2010 05:01 am
@FBM,
The family is trading on the reputation of Kim Il Sung...that is bound to be diluted by the time of the grandson, Kim Jong-un.
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Nov, 2010 05:51 am
@Ionus,
From what defectors report, it was diluted by KJI's rise to power. They say KIS is still revered as the revolutionary founder, but KJI's 'fame' was/is largely forced, and many or most NKoreans secretly view him as a despot. There may not be anything left over for the new guy. End times for the NK regime may be at hand. Seems pretty likely, whether the change comes from the inside or out.
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Nov, 2010 06:21 am
Defense Secretary resigns after criticism of the military's tepid response.
0 Replies
 
Ionus
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Nov, 2010 07:12 am
@FBM,
The end of a despotic regime with nuclear weapons. I wonder if our luck will hold ?
0 Replies
 
revelette
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Nov, 2010 07:51 am
I know Carter is an easy target but he has been involved with NK for some time now and just recently came back from over there, he has an article..

North Korea's consistent message to the U.S.
realjohnboy
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Nov, 2010 09:23 am
@revelette,
President Carter (arguably one of our better ex-Presidents) will get nowhere with his suggestion of bi-lateral talks with North Korea. South Korea, the U.S., China etc would never support the concept.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Nov, 2010 10:07 am
I have no more questions . . . Sarah Palin has said that we have to stand by our North Korean allies . . .
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Nov, 2010 11:35 am
@revelette,
revelette wrote:

I know Carter is an easy target but he has been involved with NK for some time now and just recently came back from over there, he has an article..

North Korea's consistent message to the U.S.



So easy a target that there's no sport in taking a shot at him.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Nov, 2010 11:37 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

I have no more questions . . . Sarah Palin has said that we have to stand by our North Korean allies . . .


she's so bright and shiny it's hard to look at her
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Nov, 2010 12:37 pm
This is a game with no good end in sight.

The possible reasons for North Korea's aggressive behavior have been discussed, and none of them present any possibility of an outcome that will put an end to what has become routine.

Direct military conflict, beyond these limited engagements, seems to be out of the question. A mushroom cloud rising over the rubble of Seoul is far too likely an outcome to warrant the risk.

Even if the Chinese agreed to additional sanctions designed to bring the regime to its knees, it would almost certainly have the same result as direct armed confrontation. The worse conditions in NK become, the more likely they will respond with aggression.

I would like to believe that there is already action being taken to subvert the regime from within, but that is by no means a sure solution and will take a long time.

All that the US can do is talk tough, periodically give in to NK extortion under the guise of negotiating a peaceful solution, and hope that one of these incidents don't spiral out of control.

We missed our chance at keeping nukes out of their hands, because the only sure way to do so was fraught with peril and unpleasant outcomes, and our leaders for too long actually believed the North Koreans could be talked down from the precipice. Unfortunately, the precipice is the only place where the regime can thrive.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Nov, 2010 01:35 pm
Looks like we will end up waiting them out, as in cold war wait. Hoping once again nobody unleashes the nukes. Nobody is willing to act on other options, I think.
0 Replies
 
 

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