25
   

North Korea: What to do?

 
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 07:39 am
@FBM,
I think we are going to have to stop fooling around
and take out the commie regime, before it gets seriously nuclear.

I don 't believe that Obama has the balls.





David
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 07:55 am
@Ionus,
On China: http://news.yahoo.com/s/time/20101124/wl_time/08599203301100

If this is correct, China's news sources are already depicting this as an act of aggression by the SOUTH. Wtf.
Ionus
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 08:04 am
@FBM,
China has a large pacifist population. They are even more introverted then the USA before WWI and WWII. Perhaps it is simply to explain why their ally is in the foriegn news as an aggressor. I shudder to think what it means if it is any serious prepositioning.
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 09:13 am
@OmSigDAVID,
I don't know if he does or not, but the nuclear threat couldn't be much clearer. KJI was advertising his nukes while Bush was still in power and instead Bush went after Iraq based on flimsy evidence of weapons of mass destruction. I dunno. I don't want to get into US politics. Too much local **** on my plate atm.
0 Replies
 
PUNKEY
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 12:22 pm
"Whatever happens, a one million men army is to be taken very seriously."

Yup and they'd be flooding the South via hundreds of underground tunnels. The US losses would be severe.

All out war is the last thing the US wants or needs.

I'm sure the phone lines between the US and China are red-hot.
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 12:47 pm

We have yet to field test
our Neutron Bom.





David
eurocelticyankee
 
  4  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 01:04 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
It's not only balls that are needed, brains would be handy too.

So if you were President D you would bomb them into the stone age, nuke a few million men , women and children. Don't think about it, just do it.

Yi-hah, kill zem all, yi-hah.

Don't you just love the armchair generals. Laughing
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 01:13 pm
@eurocelticyankee,
At least the Russians were not nuts; the North Koreas are.

Thay are crazy in an aggressive way and getting progressively more nuclear about it.
This is intolerably dangerous.
We need to take care of it while it is still POSSIBLE,
without considering the well-being of the communist enemy.

The US Government exists to attend to the Constitutionally designated needs
of AMERICA, not of North Korea.





David
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 01:14 pm
@PUNKEY,
PUNKEY wrote:

All out war is the last thing the US wants or needs.



Which is precisely what the North Koreans are counting on.

The question is whether or not all out war truly is the last thing the US wants, because if it is, North Korea can get away with an awful lot.

If there is a nation on earth capable of taking a game of chicken one step too far, it's North Korea.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 01:17 pm
@PUNKEY,
PUNKEY wrote:
All out war is the last thing the US wants or needs.
If we nuke them, it will be a short war.





David
eurocelticyankee
 
  3  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 01:30 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
You would do well in a country like Nth Korea, You'd shoot up the ranks, probably be a general by now. All that KILL, KILL, KILL attitude would go down well there.
Ah well, you have to make do with what you got.
So back to armchair warfare. Laughing
eurocelticyankee
 
  2  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 01:45 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Dave I've a great idea. We send you and your big balls over there. We put you at the DMZ and sit you on a nice appaloosa, give you a pair of six-shooters, put the reins in your teeth, slap that horses arse, (not you Dave, the horse) and stand back and watch you sort them commie bastards out. YI-HAH. Laughing Laughing Laughing
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 05:38 pm
Looks like another nuke test is in the cards for the North. U.S. Moves Spy Aircraft in Preparation for N.Korean Nuke Test

I really don't see how the rest of the world can just sit idly by while NK figures out how to weaponize its nukes and mount them on ICBMs. Is it really because there's no oil there, and it's not the home of some world religion? Jeez, even China doesn't want a nuclear North, do they? It's already causing both SK and Japan to consider going nuclear. Nobody wants NE Asia to turn into a nuclear Mexican standoff.
0 Replies
 
realjohnboy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 05:56 pm
Good morning, FBM. I think it is morning there. Am I correct?
The Korea's story is beginning to slip in the American press. That is my impression. Part of that could be attributable to the somewhat casual response from the South Korean public. A sort of "we've been through this before" attitude.
The U.S. is sending an aircraft carrier group to the area to participate in exercises. China has seemed to yawn about the entire incident.
Some here on your thread have been quite strident regarding what should happen. I don't pretend to have a solution or a prediction.
Please continue to report. My experience in running threads is that, if you can write in an evenhanded way, many folks will follow even if they don't participate.
-rjb
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 06:06 pm
I am following. Don't have anything to add.
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 06:12 pm
@realjohnboy,
Thanks for that, rjb. Yeah, it's just after 9 a.m. here. :coffee: Good morning!

Yes, it's hard to see things clearly when you don't keep somewhat dispassionate about it. This whole mess on the peninsula is fueled by passion, if you think about it.

If the SK response seems casual from the outside, it's everything but from the inside. Yes, the locals are used to this sort of thing in general, but everyone's aware that this is something new: civilian targets. Maybe it's the old stereotype of the 'inscrutable Asian'? Trust me, there's a lot going on behind the scenes. url=http://joongangdaily.joins.com/article/view.asp?aid=2928854]Here's just a hint of it:[/url]

Quote:
Conservatives vent fury over Lee’s soft response to attack

Anger from conservatives - even the ruling Grand National Party - over the administration’s soft reaction to North Korea’s deadly shelling of Yeonpyeong Island boiled over yesterday.

The military also came under heavy criticism for failing to react more strongly. Lawmakers grilled Minister of National Defense Kim Tae-young about the armed forces’ initial counterattack on the North, saying the military should have responded more ruthlessly, including conducting an air strike on the guns used in the attack.

Tuesday’s artillery barrage on the island near the western inter-Korean border was the first North Korean attack on South Korean soil since the Armistice Agreement ended the Korean War in 1953. It was also the second deadly attack on the South in less than eight months. The North torpedoed the warship Cheonan in March, which Pyongyang denies.

President Lee Myung-bak had roller-coaster reactions to the attack throughout the day on Tuesday as Blue House officials repeatedly changed the tone of what Lee said.

Shortly after Tuesday’s attack, Lee was quoted by the presidential office during an emergency meeting that the government must “do everything to prevent the situation from escalating into a full-blown war.”

Blue House senior presidential secretary for public affairs, Hong Sang-pyo, retracted that remark a few hours later and flatly rejected that Lee had ordered the military to refrain from taking any actions that could escalate the situation. The denial was reiterated by the presidential chief of staff, Yim Tae-hee, at a National Assembly hearing yesterday.

Later Tuesday night, Lee visited the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Blue House officials quoted the president ordering “powerful retaliation if the North stages additional provocations,” including a strike on a missile base if necessary.

“The retaliation must be so powerful that the North would never provoke again,” Lee was quoted as saying.

Conservatives were upset about the president’s initial response. Even the ruling Grand Nationals raised their voices at a meeting of lawmakers to criticize the Blue House’s tepid handling of the situation.

GNP Representative Hong Sa-duk attacked the Blue House’s soft stance.

“Let me say a word about those bastards at the Blue House who advised the president to say the situation should be managed to avoid a full-blown war,” Hong said. “They must all be fired for advising the president to have such a weak response.”

Said GNP Representative Song Kwang-ho: “What did our military do for an hour after the North’s attack? The game is all over and what stern countermeasures are we talking about?

“We must use all our firepower to devastate the North if a single round of shell lands here,” Song added.

GNP lawmakers shouted their agreement. Criticizing the military leadership for doing nothing while waiting for orders from above, Song said Lee should fire the defense minister and top military officials, including the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The conservative opposition Liberty Forward Party was the first to condemn the Blue House on Tuesday.

“The [president’s] order to avoid a full-blown war could have put a break on the military employing swift and overpowering countermeasures, so that’s just wrong,” said Lee Hoi-chang, head of the LFP.

At the National Assembly, lawmakers grilled Defense Minister Kim as to whether the military’s immediate countermeasure was swift and powerful enough to counter the North’s attack. The North fired 170 rounds of artillery while the South fired back 80 rounds. According to the military, the North concentrated its shelling for 21 minutes starting at 2:34 p.m. and then paused until it launched a second barrage at 3:10. The second attack continued for 31 minutes. It took 13 minutes for the South to fire back at the North after the initial attack.

“If you had used our Air Force capability from the beginning and completely destroyed the North’s guns, there would have been no second attack,” said GNP Representative Chung Mi-kyung to the defense minister.

She also criticized the military for only firing 80 rounds in return.

Said Kim in reply: “If we had used our Air Force capability, the North probably would have been unable to stage the second attack. But that could have led to a full-blown war.”

He also said 90 of the 170 rounds that the North fired went into the sea.

GNP lawmaker Kim Jang-soo, who served as a defense minister in the Roh Moo-hyun administration, urged the military to act more aggressively.

“The military’s countermeasure to the second attack was disappointing,” he said. “It is understandable to counter the first shelling with the K-9 artillery system, but we should have countered the second attack with a ruthless surgical air strike.

“If there is another provocation, you should hit them hard, even if it will cost your minister’s post,” Kim said.


By Ser Myo-ja [[email protected]]
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 06:43 pm
@eurocelticyankee,
eurocelticyankee wrote:
You would do well in a country like Nth Korea,
You'd shoot up the ranks, probably be a general by now.
All that KILL, KILL, KILL attitude would go down well there.
Ah well, you have to make do with what you got.
So back to armchair warfare. Laughing
To be a general officer in a communist state is still to be a slave. U can have it.





David
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 06:46 pm
@realjohnboy,
Not so quiet here as you might think: http://joongangdaily.joins.com/article/view.asp?aid=2928851

Quote:
Public angry, confused, exasperated

Protesters yesterday burn North Korean flags at a rally in Seoul denouncing the North’s attack. [REUTERS/YONHAP]

Patriotic sentiments ran high in South Korea after a North Korean bombardment devastated an island near the Northern Limit Line and killed two marines and two civilians.

Gweon Gyeong-jin, a 31-year-old housewife from Asan, Gyeonggi, said she doesn’t want unification of the two Koreas after the bloody conflagration. “Before the bombardment, I wanted reunification to boost our nation’s power and also felt sorry for the starving people across the border,” she said. “But now I think unification is not a priority for us anymore. Protecting ourselves and tightening national security are our top priorities.”

Busan-based housewife Kim Hwa-sun, 62, said, “North Korea’s attack can’t be accepted because it aimed at people from the same nation.”

Kim Heung-kuk, a 50-year-old singer who did military service as a marine, said he feels pain for the killed soldiers. “When I saw the island was bombarded, I felt pain as if I were on it,” Kim said.

About 30 conservative civic groups held a press conference yesterday to excoriate North Korea for the attack.

“The international community has been keeping an eye on North Korea because of its attack on our Navy warship Cheonan, the succession scenario and the recent disclosure of its uranium enrichment. We can’t hide our worries about such a serious military provocation, which caused a collision between the two Koreas,” said the Korea Freedom Federation.

After the press conference, the groups had a street rally in central Seoul, criticizing North Korea.

Citizens who watched the attacks live on television blamed not only North Korea but South Korea’s unsatisfactory defense.

Hwang Jae-seong, a 19-year-old living in Seoul and waiting to go into the military for compulsory service, said, “The young soldiers have been dying [since the sinking of the Cheonan in March], but I feel the government is just backing off from North Korea’s provocation.”

Families who lost sons in previous North Korean attacks also expressed deep concern about the government’s timid response.

“How can an incident [like the Cheonan’s sinking] happen again?” asked Lee In-ok, father of a sailor who died in the March Cheonan attack. “I think this attack was caused by the government’s wrong response to the North. The government should have received an apology from North Korea for the Cheonan incident.”

Hwang Eun-tae, 62-year-old father of a soldier who died in a sea battle near Yeonpyeong in 2002 that killed six military men, said, “I think the military has failed in its security and strategy, and what we get is more bereaved families who lost their sons.”

Bang Yeong-min, whose wife was shot by a North Korean sniper while visiting the Mount Kumgang resort on July 11, 2008, said, “Nothing has changed since my wife died. The government should have taken firm measures against the North when she was murdered.”


By Kang In-sik, Kim Hee-jin [[email protected]]
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 06:46 pm
@eurocelticyankee,
eurocelticyankee wrote:
Dave I've a great idea. We send you and your big balls over there. We put you at the DMZ and sit you on a nice appaloosa, give you a pair of six-shooters, put the reins in your teeth, slap that horses arse, (not you Dave, the horse) and stand back and watch you sort them commie bastards out. YI-HAH. Laughing Laughing Laughing
I do no "sorting"; this is a job for nuclear warfare, while it is still viable.

We shoud not let things get out of hand,
tho I expect that Obama will.





David
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2010 06:50 pm

We presently find ourselves in a situation that is similar in principle
to that when the nazis began becoming aggressive, regardless of the Treaty of Versailles.
We waited TOO LONG, doing nothing but talking.





David
 

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