OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 10:34 am
@H2O MAN,
H2O MAN wrote:
Conservative democrats are rare, but very welcome.
Yes; u don t see them much any more.
Thay were around around 50 or 60 years ago.
0 Replies
 
okie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 01:41 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:
Quote:
Yes, ci, Southern Democrats formed the backbone of the KKK for a very long time. Robert Byrd was an example of that stereotypical member.
You keep trotting out this bit of nonsense. Those KKK members were conservatives to the bone. It doesn't matter what party they were in. They were nowhere close to anything that one might associate with the word liberal.

You illustrate a profound ignorance with this silly meme, Okie. It does you justice.
You and fellow libs continue your ignorance of history, as well as what reality is today. I will do what I've done numerous times, and that is to recommend the following website, to get the truth from the people themselves, conservative black people that know their history. When you get into the site, a good start would be to click on "Black History Test."

http://www.nbra.info/
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 02:29 pm
@okie,
The essence of liberalism is deviation from SOMETHING,
a partial rejection of something, inconsistent with its original meaning.
For instance, if a boy is sent by his mother to the store with a
shopping list of 10 items and he decides not to buy 3 of them,
he is being LIBERAL, as to that list, because he DEVIATED from it
and he acted inconsistently with his mother's original meaning.
If he applies some of the money to the purchase of candy of his choice,
instead of his mother's choice of medicine, he is being liberal,
in distorting the original intendment of the shopping list.

When I spell fonetically, I am being LIBERAL as to paradigmatic spelling.



Conservative means keeping rigidly unbending in the enforcement of a rule,
or law, or agreement or some paradigm; accordingly, conservatives conserve
that rule or agreement or paradigm (e.g., a common style of dress, or style of art, or interpretation of a contract).

Liberal means deviating from some rule, or law,
or agreement or some paradigm, and not taking it too seriously.

For instance,
if men are playing poker n one rakes in the pot
alleging that he has a flush, when he has 4 clubs and a spade,
and when challenged on this behavior, he declares
the liberal motto: " hay, that 's CLOSE ENUF; don 't be
too technical; don 't split hairs; just don t be a ball buster, OK ?
I had a fight with my cousin, yesterday I got a flat tire,
I belong to a minority group and my left foot stinks, so gimme a break n deal the cards."

Hence, he advocates the position that logic shoud be SUBORDINATED to emotion
and that thay shoud take a LIBERAL VU
of the rules of poker because his sob story OUTRANKS
the technical rules requiring 5 cards of 1 suit for a flush.

Liberal = UNFAITHFUL to a concept or to an agreement.

"Conservative" means ORTHODOX.
"Conservative" means non-deviant.
"Liberal" means deviant.
Without having deviated from something no one can be liberal
because the essence of liberalism is turning away from something.

For instance, if u attend a formal banquet in a black tuxedo
with red sneakers, u deviate from the paradigm of formal dress,
thereby taking a liberal vu thereof. If u attend it in your underwear,
then u take a MORE LIBERAL interpretation of that paradigm.
If u attend it naked, then u apply a radical interpretation
( "from the root" ) of that paradigm.

Whether liberalism is good or bad
depends upon WHAT the liberal is veering away from.
Like when Boris Yeltsin veered away from communism, that was a GOOD thing.
When Deputy Fuhrer Rudolf Hess flew to Scotland in 1941, he was a liberal Nazi, because he was deviating from Hitler’s war policy.

Liberalism includes ANY kind of deviation,
in any direction of 360 degrees of arc + up n down.

There is no logical semantic constriction on liberalism
that it can only exist in the direction of collectivist-authoritarianism a/k/a socialism.
Liberalism can be in the opposite direction or in any direction,
so long as it is deviant.

Barry Goldwater was a conservative BECAUSE his philosophy
did NOT deviate from the pro-freedom philosophy of the Founders of this Republic as set forth in the Constitution.





David
cicerone imposter
 
  0  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 02:37 pm
@okie,
okie, Here's some sources on the KKK - from history. See if you can identify which party belongs closer to the KKK?

Quote:
From About.com:
Former Confederate soldiers and white sympathizers joined vigilante groups in order to undermine political and social reforms, primarily those which involved greater political participation of freed slaves.
The most recent incarnation of the KKK started as a reaction to the Civil Rights movement during the 1960s. Whereas the original Klan used lynchings and midnight raids in order to intimidate blacks, this Klan bombed churches and murdered civil rights workers - and, this time, it was without enough political support to get away with it.
Today the KKK has been greatly weakened as their views have become more and more radical. They consider themselves a Christian organization and base their doctrines upon their own reading of the Bible. Their theology is strongly influenced by Christian Reconstructionism - they hope to "reconstruct" the United States along biblical (primarily Old Testament) lines and to establish a white-dominated theocracy.


From the KKK handbook:
In this manual, the KKK held many beliefs that they still hold today:
a) They have a "task of developing a genuine spirit of American patriotism."
b) Their racial task is "to maintain forever white supremacy" and "to maintain forever the God-given supremacy of the white race." "White men must not mix their blood with that of colored or other inferior races." c) Their pledge of secrecy is "to keep solemnly secret the symbols of the order" because the "alien world is eager to learn all it can of the organization." "These matters must never be divulged to the alien."


From Yahoo Answers
:
As industrialization and urbanization mushroomed, labor unions grew with them. Unionization threatened jobs. Many a worker joined klaverns expressly to thwart the upward mobility of all those upstart Catholics, immigrants and blacks so as to protect their own job. KKK was composed of many working stiffs, but the organization and membership were very much anti-union. As the union movement grew, so grew the Klan. The New KKK offered solutions and protection.


OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 02:48 pm
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:
okie, Here's some sources on the KKK - from history.
That shoud be "here ARE some sources" not here IS some sources nor "Here's some sources" as u put it.





David
cicerone imposter
 
  0  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 02:57 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
David, Where did you learn English. "Here's" identifies the section in quotes.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 03:24 pm
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:
David, Where did you learn English. [ ? ] "Here's" identifies the section in quotes.
I learned it in New York.
Your illogical non-sequitur remains what it is.

Incidentally, the punctuation mark after your word "English" shoud be a question mark, not a period.





David
okie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 06:11 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:
Whether liberalism is good or bad
depends upon WHAT the liberal is veering away from.
Like when Boris Yeltsin veered away from communism, that was a GOOD thing.
When Deputy Fuhrer Rudolf Hess flew to Scotland in 1941, he was a liberal Nazi, because he was deviating from Hitler’s war policy.
I agree in general, but when liberalism becomes the standard behavior or political system, as communism was, it does not automatically become conservatism by virtue that the populace has accepted it for a time. It remains liberalism, and so I would argue that Yeltsin was veering away from communism and back to conservative principles. Similarly, Hitler's behavior was liberal because it was deviant. I look at conservatism and liberalism from a longer term and principled view of what is normal and right.
Quote:
Liberalism includes ANY kind of deviation,
in any direction of 360 degrees of arc + up n down.

There is no logical semantic constriction on liberalism
that it can only exist in the direction of collectivist-authoritarianism a/k/a socialism.
Liberalism can be in the opposite direction or in any direction,
so long as it is deviant.
As I've already pointed out, I think communism and Nazism are two examples of deviancy from the normal and acceptable behavior.

Quote:
Barry Goldwater was a conservative BECAUSE his philosophy
did NOT deviate from the pro-freedom philosophy of the Founders of this Republic as set forth in the Constitution.

David
Agreed
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 06:26 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
It wasn't a question; it was rhetorical. Your use of English shows you don't understand grammar.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 06:47 pm
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:
It wasn't a question; it was rhetorical. Your use of English shows you don't understand grammar.
He asks me:
"David, Where did you learn English." and then he tells me that
"it wasn't a question;" and that I am the one who does not understand grammar.

I know what a question is.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 06:50 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Quote:
CI wrote: okie, Here's some sources on the KKK - from history.


Quote:
OmSig replied: That shoud be "here ARE some sources" not here IS some sources nor "Here's some sources" as u put it.


That's absolutely false, Om. This is simply another example of a pedant, [in its most pejorative sense], who knows nothing about how language actually works, trying to buffalo a native speaker who does know how his language works.

Corpus studies show that in speech Here's/Where's/How's/There's + plural predominates by a vast margin, among all levels of speakers.

Where's my keys?

How's your mom and dad?

There's two guys at the door?

Here's the books I borrowed
0 Replies
 
plainoldme
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 08:15 pm
@cicerone imposter,
How is that you and I post reasoned and sourced material only to be answered with prattling from the waterboy-david-okie peanut gallery?
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  0  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 08:37 pm
@okie,
A slanted history test doesn't make it the truth about black history.

I could make up a test that shows that the indigenous peoples in the US run the country but it wouldn't make it true even though every question would have true answers about what they have done.
0 Replies
 
plainoldme
 
  0  
Reply Sat 26 Feb, 2011 08:54 pm
PEW FORUM ON RELIGION & PUBLIC LIFE
The Tea Party, Religion and Social Issues

by Scott Clement, Survey Research Aanalyst, and John C. Green, Senior Research Adviser, Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life
February 23, 2011


The Tea Party movement clearly played a role in rejuvenating the Republican Party in 2010, helping the GOP take control of the House of Representatives and make gains in the Senate. Tea Party supporters made up 41% of the electorate on Nov. 2, and 86% of them voted for Republican House candidates, according to exit polls. But the precise nature of the Tea Party has been less clear. Is it solely a movement to reduce the size of government and cut taxes, as its name -- some people refer to it as the Taxed Enough Already party -- implies? Or do its supporters share a broader set of conservative positions on social as well as economic issues? Does the movement draw support across the religious spectrum? Or has the religious right "taken over" the Tea Party, as some commentators have suggested?1

A new analysis by the Pew Research Center's Forum on Religion & Public Life finds that Tea Party supporters tend to have conservative opinions not just about economic matters, but also about social issues such as abortion and same-sex marriage. In addition, they are much more likely than registered voters as a whole to say that their religion is the most important factor in determining their opinions on these social issues.2 And they draw disproportionate support from the ranks of white evangelical Protestants.

The analysis shows that most people who agree with the religious right also support the Tea Party. But support for the Tea Party is not synonymous with support for the religious right. An August 2010 poll by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life found that nearly half of Tea Party supporters (46%) had not heard of or did not have an opinion about "the conservative Christian movement sometimes known as the religious right"; 42% said they agree with the conservative Christian movement and roughly one-in-ten (11%) said they disagree.3 More generally, the August poll found greater familiarity with and support for the Tea Party movement (86% of registered voters had heard at least a little about it at the time and 27% expressed agreement with it) than for the conservative Christian movement (64% had heard of it and 16% expressed support for it).

In addition to the August poll, this analysis draws on other Pew Research Center polling from September 2010 through February 2011. The polls included a variety of questions about the Tea Party, social and economic issues, and the role of religion in forming people's opinions on these issues. The Pew Research Center for the People & the Press has additional resources on the Tea Party. See, for example, the analyses from February 2011 and April 2010.

Conservative and Critical of Government

As previously reported by the Pew Research Center, the Tea Party is much more Republican and conservative than the public as a whole. Indeed, Tea Party supporters are more conservative on economic issues and the size of government than either Republicans in general or all registered voters.4 According to a September 2010 survey by the Pew Research Center, almost nine-in-ten registered voters who agree with the Tea Party (88%) prefer a smaller government with fewer services, compared with 80% of all Republicans and Republican-leaning independents and 56% of all registered voters.

In the same survey, fully 87% of Tea Party supporters said government is almost always wasteful, eight points more than Republicans overall (79%) and 26 points more than all registered voters (61%). And while more than half of registered voters (54%) said that corporations make too much money, Tea Party supporters were inclined to see corporations as making a fair and reasonable amount of profit. Indeed, Tea Party supporters took this position by a two-to-one margin (62% fair profit vs. 30% too much profit). A somewhat smaller percentage of all Republicans and Republican-leaning independents (55%) said corporations make a fair and reasonable profit.

Conservative on Social Issues, Too

In addition to adopting a conservative approach to the economy, Tea Party supporters also tend to take socially conservative positions on abortion and same-sex marriage. While registered voters as a whole are closely divided on same-sex marriage (42% in favor, 49% opposed), Tea Party supporters oppose it by more than two-to-one (64% opposed, 26% in favor). Similarly, almost six-in-ten (59%) of those who agree with the Tea Party say abortion should be illegal in all or most cases, 17 percentage points higher than among all registered voters. Tea Party supporters closely resemble Republican voters as a whole on these issues.

On immigration, Tea Party supporters are 20 percentage points more likely than registered voters overall to say better border security is the most important priority in dealing with illegal immigration (51% vs. 31%). About half as many Tea Party supporters (10%) as registered voters on the whole (22%) see the establishment of a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants as the top priority.

Tea Party backers also heavily favor the rights of gun owners. The September survey found that those who agree with the Tea Party favor protecting gun rights over controlling gun ownership by more than four-to-one (78% vs. 18%). Registered voters overall divide almost evenly on this issue (51% give priority to gun rights, 45% give priority to gun control). A January 2011 survey, conducted by the Pew Research Center in the wake of the Tucson shootings, showed no significant change in public views on the issue of gun control and gun rights.

Influence of Religion

According to an August 2010 survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life, Tea Party supporters are much more likely than the public overall to cite "religious beliefs" as the biggest influence on their views of same-sex marriage and abortion.

Roughly half of Tea Party backers said their religious beliefs are the most important influence on their views of gay marriage (53%) and abortion (46%). Furthermore, Tea Party supporters who cited religion as a top factor were overwhelmingly opposed to same-sex marriage and legal abortion. By contrast, 37% of registered voters overall cited their religious beliefs as the most important influence on their views of same-sex marriage and 28% cited religion as the primary influence on their views of abortion.

Strong Support from Evangelicals

Support for the Tea Party varies dramatically across religious groups. Surveys from November 2010 through February 2011 show that white evangelical Protestants are roughly five times as likely to agree with the movement as to disagree with it (44% vs. 8%), though substantial numbers of white evangelicals either have no opinion or have not heard of the movement (48%). Three-in-ten or more of white Catholics (33%) and white mainline Protestants (30%) also agree with the Tea Party, but among these two groups at least one-in-five people disagrees with the movement.

Among Jews, the religiously unaffiliated and black Protestants, however, there is more opposition than support for the Tea Party. Nearly half of Jews (49%) say they disagree with the Tea Party movement, compared with 15% who agree with it. Among the unaffiliated, more than four-in-ten (42%) disagree with the movement while 15% agree with it. About two-thirds of atheists and agnostics (67%) disagree with the movement. Most black Protestants polled (56%) say they have not heard of the Tea Party or have no opinion about it. But among black Protestants who offer an opinion, those who disagree with the movement outnumber those who agree with it by more than five-to-one (37% disagree vs. 7% agree).

The Tea Party and the Conservative Christian Movement

Americans who support the conservative Christian movement, sometimes known as the religious right, also overwhelmingly support the Tea Party. In the Pew Research Center's August 2010 poll, 69% of registered voters who agreed with the religious right also said they agreed with the Tea Party. Moreover, both the religious right and the Tea Party count a higher percentage of white evangelical Protestants in their ranks (45% among the religious right, 34% among the Tea Party and 22% among all registered voters in the August 2010 survey). Religiously unaffiliated people are less common among Tea Party or religious right supporters than among the public at-large (3% among the religious right, 10% among the Tea Party and 15% among all registered voters in the August poll).

While most people who agree with the conservative Christian movement support the Tea Party, many people who support the Tea Party are unfamiliar with or uncertain about the religious right. In the August poll, almost half of Tea Party supporters said they had not heard of or did not have an opinion on the conservative Christian movement (46%). Among those who did offer an opinion, however, Tea Party supporters agreed with the religious right by a roughly four-to-one margin (42% agreed with the religious right, 11% disagreed).

Overall, the Tea Party appears to be more widely known and to garner broader support than the religious right. The August survey found that 86% of registered voters had heard of the Tea Party, compared with 64% who had heard of the conservative Christian movement; among Republican and Republican-leaning voters, 91% had heard of the Tea Party compared with 68% who were familiar with the conservative Christian movement. About half of Republican and Republican-leaning registered voters (51%) agreed with the Tea Party in the August poll, as did more than a quarter (27%) of all registered voters. By contrast, about three-in-ten Republican and Republican-leaning voters (31%) said they agreed with the conservative Christian movement, as did one-in-six registered voters overall (16%).

For more on the role of religion in politics, social issues, candidates and political parties, see the "Religion & Politics 2012" page at pewforum.org.

1. See, for example, "Is the Religious Right Taking Over the Tea Party?"; Huffington Post, Oct. 27, 2010. Also, "Tea Party Closely Linked to Religious Right, Poll Finds,"; ABC News, Oct. 5, 2010.
2. All analyses in this report are based on registered voters.
3 Respondents were asked "How much, if anything, have you heard about the conservative Christian movement sometimes known as the religious right? Have you heard a lot, a little, or nothing at all?" Those who said they had heard at least a little were then asked "In general, do you strongly agree, agree, disagree, or strongly disagree with the conservative Christian movement, or don't you have an opinion either way?"
4 Throughout this analysis, Tea Party supporters are defined as those who say they “strongly agree” or “agree” with the Tea Party movement. Most, but not all, Tea Party supporters identify with or lean toward the Republican Party. In a February 2011 Pew Research Center poll, for example, 82% of registered voters who agree with the Tea Party say they identify with or lean toward the Republican Party.
okie
 
  0  
Reply Sat 26 Feb, 2011 09:13 pm
@plainoldme,
plainoldme wrote:

PEW FORUM ON RELIGION & PUBLIC LIFE
The Tea Party, Religion and Social Issues

by Scott Clement, Survey Research Aanalyst, and John C. Green, Senior Research Adviser, Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life
February 23, 2011....
A new analysis by the Pew Research Center's Forum on Religion & Public Life finds that Tea Party supporters tend to have conservative opinions.....
Big revelation there, pom!!!!!!
And liberals "tend" to be impractical too!!!!!!
plainoldme
 
  0  
Reply Sat 26 Feb, 2011 10:39 pm
@okie,
So knee-jerk! So predictable! Never thinking.
0 Replies
 
plainoldme
 
  0  
Reply Sat 26 Feb, 2011 10:40 pm
Via USA Today:

The Tea Party Patriots, one of the largest organizing groups of the movement, want to assign personal bloggers to track every member of Congress, not just the ones they supported.

The group will launch a recruitment drive this week coinciding with a weekend policy summit being held in Phoenix for state and local coordinators. Shelby Blakely, a stay-at-home mom from eastern Washington state who is organizing the project, said she has little doubt they will be able to round up enough people to tackle a job that she describes as "citizen journalism meets adopt-a-congressman."

"One of the strengths that the Tea Party has is we have a massive army," Blakely said. "We have millions of manpower hours and thousands of people willing to do heavy lifting."

There are already dozens of political and news websites that track the big picture of Congress. Hometown newspapers, TV stations and websites sometimes track individual members of Congress.

The Tea Party Patriots believe a centralized hub for member-by-member blogs would not only hold their Tea Party legislators accountable but would better highlight for voters how non-Tea Party legislators are voting in Washington.

The Tea Partiers claim they will be a conservative counterbalance to the "biased" mainstream media and the numerous "liberal outfits" blogging about Congress, forgetting that they already have Fox News, Washington Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Financial Times, Drudge, Hot Air, Politico, Powerline, etc. in place to do exactly what they are proposing.

But if the Tea Party Patriots do manage to create a technologically sound website that will gather together all of their tracking of each and every member of Congress, frankly, it would be a tool of interest to many who report on politics. I for one would love to be able to access a daily record of each minute detail of every single Congressperson, even if the actions are all filtered through a Tea Party lens.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Feb, 2011 11:27 pm
@plainoldme,
That is a very fine idea,
bearing in mind that the politicians are working for us.
We don 't work for them.
We 've gotta remember who 's the boss here (it is us, not our lowlife employees).

To those blogs, we will add our Special Interest Groups
to which many of us belong, who watch them on federal,
state n local levels, executive, legislative n judicial functions.





David
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  5  
Reply Sun 27 Feb, 2011 08:24 pm
http://cdn-www.i-am-bored.com/media/teabaggergame.jpg
H2O MAN
 
  0  
Reply Mon 28 Feb, 2011 06:30 am
@DrewDad,
Left wing tea party?
0 Replies
 
 

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