0
   

Memories of 21, 42, 63 ... the 84th meandering

 
 
danon5
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2009 05:38 pm
@Stradee,
Stradee, we are getting tons of rainstorms. Temps in the high 80's. Looks like it's going to be a 'Long Hot Summer'.......... And, that HAIL we had, 2.5 inches across - - never heard of around here. The local news is warning of tornados - I haven't heard of one of those around here in my 66 yrs.

Stradee
 
  2  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2009 08:00 pm
@danon5,
The hail was something from the pics you posted. Scary and i bet could've done some damage to vehicles - people not able to exit roadways. Shocked

We haven't had tornado warnings since a few years ago. In 2000, Tornados landed in Mendacino, Los Angeles, Madera, Glen County, and a small tornado hit Oakland! good grief

Hang in there, Dan!
danon5
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 May, 2009 09:10 pm
@Stradee,
I have two vehicles that aren't in the garage - I parked each under a tree in the yard with thick branches. That saved them both. Then a little water rinse and good as new. Many other vehicles were damaged - there are signs everywhere to fix Hail Damage.

danon5
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 May, 2009 02:11 pm
@danon5,
Alright!!! I still love to Reply to myself. In fact, at my age I'm beginning to talk to myself more and more each year - which, at my age seems more like a couple of weeks. The other day, my Patti was talking to me and interrupted herself. Oh, well, like I said it sure make watching movies great. They are all new all over again each time we watch them.

Serious Big Grin!!
0 Replies
 
Stradee
 
  2  
Reply Sat 2 May, 2009 02:19 pm
Shocked Laughing

http://rainforest.care2.com/i?p=583091674
0 Replies
 
alex240101
 
  3  
Reply Sat 2 May, 2009 11:29 pm
@ehBeth,
Wonderful yellow petals.

Like sunshine.

I am brightened.

and most importantly,...I am clicked. Happy Sunday all.
0 Replies
 
ul
 
  3  
Reply Sun 3 May, 2009 06:04 am
[urlhttp://img530.imageshack.us/img530/5326/450pxconvallariaolivr2.jpg][/url]
Stradee
 
  2  
Reply Sun 3 May, 2009 09:20 am
@ul,
Good earthturn Alex, ul, and all wildclickers

http://www.skimbacolifestyle.com/wp-content/themes/thesis/rotator/spring-flower.jpg





http://rainforest.care2.com/i?p=583091674
0 Replies
 
sumac
 
  2  
Reply Sun 3 May, 2009 01:41 pm
Clicked, and hoping for a thunderstorm or two.
0 Replies
 
sumac
 
  3  
Reply Sun 3 May, 2009 01:41 pm
April 30, 2009
Editorial

Undoing the Damage, Step by Step

The Obama administration is reversing many of the potentially damaging anti-environmental regulations rushed through in the Bush administration’s final months. This week, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar withdrew a rule that would have weakened protections for endangered species. He also took the first legal step to revoke a rule that would have allowed the ruinous coal mining practice known as mountaintop removal to inflict even greater damage on Appalachia’s landscape.

Former President George W. Bush’s endangered species rule would have greatly narrowed a longstanding requirement that federal agencies consult with scientists at the Fish and Wildlife Service or the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration before proceeding with any project like a dam or road that could harm an imperiled species. For years, such consultations had been automatic; under the Bush rule, an agency could skip this step if it decided " entirely on its own " that no species would be harmed.

Mr. Bush’s Interior Department presented the change as an overdue act of regulatory streamlining, arguing that it would only affect cases in which there was no obvious threat. But there was impressive evidence assembled by the National Audubon Society and other mainstream environmental groups that federal agencies often underestimated the threat and that projects frequently needed to be modified or scrapped altogether in order to protect endangered species.

The Bush administration also rewrote a Reagan-era rule " the so-called stream buffer rule " in a way that allowed coal companies to dump wastes produced by mountaintop mining operations into the valleys and streams below. Restoring the old rule, which barred operators from depositing debris within 100 feet of a stream, will not by itself stop the practice. The rule must be rigorously enforced, which both Democratic and Republican administrations have failed to do. The government estimates that 1,600 miles of streams in Appalachia have been wiped out this way since the mid-1980s.

Other loopholes in the law also need fixing. Bit by bit, however, the new administration is tightening the noose on a practice that should have been outlawed years ago.

Mr. Salazar says he knows that coal, which produces half of America’s electricity, is important today and will remain so. He also says that he favors a responsible energy strategy that honors the needs of nature as well as commerce. The Interior Department is charged with managing the nation’s physical resources in a balanced way. After eight years in which nature was often sacrificed to private interests, it is a relief to see the department taking that responsibility seriously.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Sun 3 May, 2009 07:03 pm
@ul,
The WildClickers have supported 2,934,210.4 square feet!

Marine Wetlands habitat supported: 223,421.7 square feet.

American Prairie habitat supported: 68,946.6 square feet.

Rainforest habitat supported: 2,641,842.1 square feet.
danon5
 
  2  
Reply Sun 3 May, 2009 09:25 pm
@ehBeth,
Hello ul. So, nice to see you again.

sumac, my last nights rainstorm is coming your way.

Hi to all Wildclickers.

0 Replies
 
sumac
 
  3  
Reply Mon 4 May, 2009 07:40 am
Thanks for the rain Danon. Our weather usually arrives via Texas so I look forward to something and hope it doesn't slide up to the NE before it arrives.
0 Replies
 
sumac
 
  3  
Reply Mon 4 May, 2009 07:41 am
Here's a novel discussion: dividing up the ocean by function or activity.

Finding Space for All in Our Crowded Seas

By Juliet Eilperin
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, May 4, 2009

The ocean is getting crowded: Fishermen are competing with offshore wind projects, oil rigs along with sand miners, recreational boaters, liquefied gas tankers and fish farmers. So a growing number of groups -- including policymakers, academics, activists and industry officials -- now say it's time to divvy up space in the sea.

"We've got competition for space in the ocean, just like we have competition for space on land," said Andrew Rosenberg, a natural resources and environment professor at the University of New Hampshire who has advised Massachusetts on the issue. "How are you going to manage it? Is it the people with the most power win? Is it whoever got there first? Is it a free-for-all?"

To resolve these conflicts, a handful of states -- including Massachusetts, California and Rhode Island -- have begun essentially zoning the ocean, drawing up rules and procedures to determine which activities can take place and where. The federal government is considering adopting a similar approach, though any coherent effort would involve sorting out the role of 20 agencies that administer roughly 140 ocean-related laws.

"It's really an idea whose time has come, and it's one of my top priorities," said Jane Lubchenco, who chairs the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. "By focusing on different sectors, nobody is paying attention to the whole -- in particular, the health of the system."

But conducting what experts call "marine spatial planning" presents scientific and political challenges, since so little of the ocean has been mapped in detail, and so many interest groups want to use it. The federal government has mapped only 20 percent of the "exclusive economic zone" that stretches from the U.S. coast out 200 nautical miles, and that's just its geophysical bottom, not the habitats and species that exist at varying levels.

Charlie Wahle, a senior scientist in NOAA's National Marine Protected Area Center, said the agency is convening experts in California to chart how groups including kayakers, the Coast Guard and fishermen use waters off the state's coast. "People have been surprisingly willing to engage and share their information and knowledge of the way it really is, as opposed to how it may look on maps," he said. "We're on the right path, but it's not a simple thing."

Marine ecologist Larry Crowder, one of several scientists at Duke University who have compiled data for such plans, said the approach makes sense because ocean resources are not "equally distributed, whether it's oil and gas, or fish, or corals." But he added that the sea has so many overlapping activities that "when you begin putting these maps together, as we've done, it quickly becomes a train wreck."

The states pioneering this approach have charted different paths. California is establishing marine protected areas along its 1,100-mile coastline under its 1999 Marine Life Protection Act, dividing it into five regions and brokering agreements with interest groups. Massachusetts, which enacted its Ocean Act only last year, is to finalize a comprehensive ocean management plan by Jan. 1 that exempts fisheries but covers all other major activities.

Ian Bowles, Massachusetts secretary of energy and environmental affairs, said the state is working to determine "what are the areas of particular ecological value that we should be protecting from other uses" and what parts of the ocean can accommodate such diverse concerns as liquefied natural gas offloading terminals, wind projects and sand mining for restoring eroding beaches.

While a few states are leading the way in the United States, the Europeans and Australians have done this for years. Charles Ehler, a Paris-based consultant who is drafting a manual on the subject for UNESCO, the U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, said the demand for offshore wind farms and other activities has spurred countries such as Belgium, Germany, Norway and the Netherlands to establish specific marine boundaries.

"There's a much greater intensity of demand for offshore space in Europe than in most of the United States," said Ehler, noting Belgium's demand exceeds its available space by 200 to 300 percent.

Even though they have a head start, policymakers overseas are struggling with many of the same questions Americans are contemplating, including how to reconcile new and traditional ocean uses, and how climate change will affect where marine species live. With the exception of Norway, few nations have been willing to subject fisheries to the same management regime as such activities as renewable energy and gravel mining.

"The traditional users of the sea have been the most resistant to marine spatial planning, because they've pretty much been free to go where they want to go and do what they want to do," Ehler said.

While California includes the fishing industry in its planning process, Massachusetts fishermen held up passage of the state's Ocean Act until they were reassured they would be exempt. "We don't want to be told, 'Oh, and this place -- you can't go here anymore,' because we were there all along," said Bill Adler, executive director of the Massachusetts Lobstermen's Association. He added that the fishing industry is already regulated separately by the state.

Some U.S. oil and gas executives have adopted a similar stance, arguing that any offshore drilling projects must undergo a federal environmental assessment. "I don't think the overall process is broken," said Marvin Odum, president of Shell Oil Co., adding that when he hears of calls for additional ecological reviews, "From where I sit, some of it can just look like delay tactics."

But as the country appears poised for a new push in offshore oil drilling, advocates such as the Ocean Conservancy's Vikki Spruill argue it needs to take a more serious look at how it coordinates activities off its coasts. "We wouldn't put a coal plant in a national park," Spruill said. Philippe Cousteau, president of the nonprofit EarthEcho International, said policymakers should put environmental considerations "first and foremost" when deciding where to locate new drilling activities.

Mary Gleason, the Nature Conservancy's senior scientist and lead planner for marine protected areas in California's central and north central coastal regions, said "there's a lot of drama" when the universe of users is included in ocean planning. "There's been a negotiated solution in all of these cases, where there's been a lot of give-and-take," she said.
Stradee
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 May, 2009 09:14 am
@sumac,
g'day wildclickers

Steady rain three days now - sue, sending....

Good articles, thanks.

http://z.about.com/d/gocalifornia/1/0/z/_/coast6.jpg





http://rainforest.care2.com/i?p=583091674
danon5
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 May, 2009 10:48 am
@Stradee,
Stradee, that looks like a highway I've driven a few times - beautiful.......... Sometimes the long way to a point is the best way.........

sumac, I can't believe (oh, yes - I guess I can) that the oceans are becoming so crowded that we now have to divy it up - - - - Shocked

Stradee
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 May, 2009 11:19 am
@danon5,
Dan, driving Highway 1 is a fabulous tour of the coast, I agree.

Did a bit more research and found a close-up of Rocky Creek Bridge - Coastal Highway 1 near Big Sur, CA.

http://www.wildnatureimages.com/images%202/040521-070..jpg

Pacific Coast Highway, Big Sur, CA
http://www.wildnatureimages.com/A%20to%20C3000/C6CT2476..jpg
Stradee
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 May, 2009 11:33 am
Further North is the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

http://www.wildnatureimages.com/images%202/040518-046..jpg
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  3  
Reply Mon 4 May, 2009 05:34 pm
@Stradee,
What a nice page of photos Very Happy

You and your 300 friends have supported 2,934,343.7 square feet!

Marine Wetlands habitat supported: 223,458.8 square feet.

American Prairie habitat supported: 68,946.6 square feet.

Rainforest habitat supported: 2,641,938.4 square feet.

~~~

National Pet Week, hamburger's birthday, and Mother's Day all coming up. Celebrate as you may!

http://dingo.care2.com/photos/1/1417a.gif
Stradee
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 May, 2009 07:09 pm
@ehBeth,
Lots to celebrate, Beth! Very Happy
http://www.petweek.org/assets/images/poster.gif

Mr. Hamburger ~
http://www.hellasmultimedia.com/webimages/birthday/images/bd92.GIF

And a prelim for Mom's Day!

http://www.hellasmultimedia.com/webimages/mother-htm/mother/images/dozen-roses-117x150.gif

0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
Copyright © 2022 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 12/06/2022 at 02:04:08