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The 2008 Republican Convention...

 
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Sep, 2008 04:26 pm
@Diest TKO,
Haha, it's like a black hole, for good arguments to fall into, Diest.

You going to watch the hoopla tonight? The Great White Hope will be on...

Cycloptichorn
Diest TKO
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Sep, 2008 04:33 pm
@old europe,
old europe wrote:

Just a suggestion, Diest:

http://i34.tinypic.com/295zfc5.gif

Not a bad idea. But not really nessisary. You're an insignificant blip on my radar, and I'm content to let you amuse me with your "ineptitude."

T
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O
0 Replies
 
Diest TKO
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Sep, 2008 04:33 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
You think I'd miss it? Never!

T
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Cycloptichorn
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Sep, 2008 11:55 pm
@Diest TKO,
What did you think?

Cycloptichorn
Diest TKO
 
  4  
Reply Thu 4 Sep, 2008 12:42 am
@Cycloptichorn,
It's an interesting strategy from the McCain Camp. They are taking a lot of risks these days. Speaking strategically, I guess they are kind of forced to if they want to stay in.

My impression I get from tonight, is that McCain is pushing Palin to solidify the base and he's is going to go after the moderates. This is potentially a good choice for him because she is not going to fair well against Biden in the debates. The goal for her now will be to simply go crowd please the base and be as partisan as she likes. no matter how poor her answers are, Biden will have to restrain himself from burying her too hard.

It seems my prediction is coming to fruition with some slight differences. It seems that McCain is okay with losing the appeal of moderates at the gain of his base. He is now gambling on getting some back in the last leg of the trip by posturing as the McCain of old.

The McCain narrative is a powerful one, and republicans are wise to use it, but I wonder what the effectiveness is to basically give the same speeches night after night? McCain's campaign adviser has said this is "not about the issues." Despite the criticisms that Obama runs a campaign or personality, he's reinforcing this notion every day with his always changing message.

I expect McCain to sound very moderate tomorrow. No more narative on war. More echoing of Liberman's speech. Basically, I'd wager that he's going to go after moderate viewers attention now that he's grabbed his base.

The downside of Palin as a pick has begun to play out in terms of her experience. The discussion has evolved around comparing her experience to Obama's. The dialog is mostly put forth by popular media because it makes a good story, but it's one that McCain wants control of. He wants to be on offense not defense.

In general, I'm really trying to understand what the republican message is? It started out with "America First" and how they were such transcendent individuals, and today it was hyper partisan lip service.

Romney spoke about promiscuity in High Schools and damned the unions on the same night Palin speaks? The irony is lost on these people.

In Short: Palin did what she needed to do which was to rally the base with a sharp-toothed speech. Her tone may get her in some trouble, but I'm sure the McCain camp is ready to spin the blow back of if their lazy just cry foul on the media.

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firefly
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Sep, 2008 10:24 am
@Diest TKO,
Yes, Diest TKO, but the Republican party has put together a platform that is probably the most conservative in it's history. If McCain trys to appear more moderate, which I agree he will probably try to do, it puts him at odds with that party platform. All the Democrats have to do is confront him with that platform to put him into a situation which will appear quite awkward, at the very least. He is, after all, the head of the party at the moment.
0 Replies
 
DontTreadOnMe
 
  2  
Reply Thu 4 Sep, 2008 01:04 pm
@Diest TKO,
Diest TKO wrote:

In general, I'm really trying to understand what the republican message is? It started out with "America First" and how they were such transcendent individuals, and today it was hyper partisan lip service.

Romney spoke about promiscuity in High Schools and damned the unions on the same night Palin speaks? The irony is lost on these people.


yer not alone. and it is incomprehensible that they not only don't see the irony, but that they are wallowing in the contradictions of their own alleged beliefs.

now if a non-republican were in the same situation, i have to believe, based on prior experiences, that the republican tags would be something along the lines of "huh! lousy mother. too busy with her big important career to notice that her slutty whooore of a daughter is knocked up with a bastard. like a bitch in heat i tell ya."


the overall effect is one of "don't do as we do, do as we say" along with "to continue doing exactly what we've been doing for the last 8 years is the change that we need".


H2O MAN
 
  2  
Reply Thu 4 Sep, 2008 01:08 pm
@DontTreadOnMe,
DontTreadOnMe wrote:

"don't do as we do, do as we say" along with "to continue doing exactly what we've been doing for the last 8 years is the change that we need".





That is the mantra of the left.
Cycloptichorn
 
  2  
Reply Thu 4 Sep, 2008 02:06 pm
This is the sort of thing that McCain doesn't need right now -

http://thehill.com/leading-the-news/westmoreland-calls-obama-uppity-2008-09-04.html

Quote:

Westmoreland was discussing vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin's speech with reporters outside the House chamber and was asked to compare her with Michelle Obama.

"Just from what little I’ve seen of her and Mr. Obama, Sen. Obama, they're a member of an elitist-class individual that thinks that they're uppity," Westmoreland said.

Asked to clarify that he used the word “uppity,” Westmoreland said, “Uppity, yeah.”


Cycloptichorn
H2O MAN
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Sep, 2008 02:09 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
Uppity describes the Obama's very well, the word fits.

adj. Informal
Taking liberties or assuming airs beyond one's station; presumptuous:
realjohnboy
 
  3  
Reply Thu 4 Sep, 2008 04:32 pm
@H2O MAN,
Your definition of "uppity" is correct, H2O. But since you are a transplant from the north to the south, you may not fully realize that the word "uppity" should be used cautiously, if at all. "Uppityniggers" was a common term during the segregation/desegregation days a half a century ago. You may not find "uppity" as offensive, and I reckon I don't either. But Westmoreland's choice of the word is not helpful to Sen McCain.
(As a total aside, when I was a lad I hitch-hiked around a lot. A lot of time in British areas. I was discreetly told that asking or thanking a young woman for a "ride" was not appropriate. Thanks for the "lift" was okay. We can all go to our dictionaries, but words have nuances, subtle or regional, that are not in our dictionaries).
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Sep, 2008 04:37 pm
@Diest TKO,
I found Romney's speech particularly odd - it seemed that he was espousing the opposite of almost everyone who followed him last night (and given he was an elected official in Mass, it seemed peculiar that he was so scathing toward the northeast elite - those are his people (how much did his and Rudy's suits cost?)). He was also a rather flat speaker - perhaps that was a set-up to make Ms. Palin appear to be an even more effective reader.
0 Replies
 
H2O MAN
 
  2  
Reply Thu 4 Sep, 2008 04:38 pm
@realjohnboy,
realjohnboy wrote:

Your definition of "uppity" is correct, H2O. But since you are a transplant from the north to the south, you may not fully realize that the word "uppity" should be used cautiously, if at all. "Uppityniggers" was a common term during the segregation/desegregation days a half a century ago. You may not find "uppity" as offensive, and I reckon I don't either. But Westmoreland's choice of the word is not helpful to Sen McCain.


I'm sure Westmoreland's usage was based on the correct definition I posted
and not in the way liberal media is spinning it in a lame effort to hurt McCain.

BTW, my journey to the south included living in Richmond, VA in the 60's and 70's.

Diest TKO
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Sep, 2008 04:40 pm
@realjohnboy,
RJB - you're out here in VA right? What area?

T
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0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Thu 4 Sep, 2008 04:44 pm
@H2O MAN,
In that case, you should know better.

I expect that you do, and that you are once again being purposefully obtuse.
H2O MAN
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Sep, 2008 04:58 pm
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:

In that case, you should know better.

I expect that you do, and that you are once again being purposefully obtuse.


Democrats should know better.

When I was in grade school my mother and I protested against the the anti-busing/segregation crowd and won.
She and I pulled down the racist banners at my school before the buses arrived the very next morning.
That was a great victory ~ I never have and never will judge a fellow human by the color of their skin.
0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  2  
Reply Thu 4 Sep, 2008 05:59 pm
@H2O MAN,
Quote:
Re: Cycloptichorn(Post 3388559)
Uppity describes the Obama's very well, the word fits.

adj. Informal
Taking liberties or assuming airs beyond one's station; presumptuous:



i guess that means that people should not "rise above or beyond their station" - because they would be "uppity" .
(thinking - hmmmm - perhaps i might be considered uppity - i guess i'm in good company > GRIN !)
hbg
Diest TKO
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Sep, 2008 06:43 pm
AP wrote:
By JIM KUHNHENN, Associated Press Writer
Wed Sep 3, 11:48 PM ET


ST. PAUL, Minn. - Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin and her Republican supporters held back little Wednesday as they issued dismissive attacks on Barack Obama and flattering praise on her credentials to be vice president. In some cases, the reproach and the praise stretched the truth.

Some examples:

PALIN: "I have protected the taxpayers by vetoing wasteful spending ... and championed reform to end the abuses of earmark spending by Congress. I told the Congress 'thanks but no thanks' for that Bridge to Nowhere."

THE FACTS: As mayor of Wasilla, Palin hired a lobbyist and traveled to Washington annually to support earmarks for the town totaling $27 million. In her two years as governor, Alaska has requested nearly $750 million in special federal spending, by far the largest per-capita request in the nation. While Palin notes she rejected plans to build a $398 million bridge from Ketchikan to an island with 50 residents and an airport, that opposition came only after the plan was ridiculed nationally as a "bridge to nowhere."

PALIN: "There is much to like and admire about our opponent. But listening to him speak, it's easy to forget that this is a man who has authored two memoirs but not a single major law or reform " not even in the state senate."

THE FACTS: Compared to McCain and his two decades in the Senate, Obama does have a more meager record. But he has worked with Republicans to pass legislation that expanded efforts to intercept illegal shipments of weapons of mass destruction and to help destroy conventional weapons stockpiles. The legislation became law last year. To demean that accomplishment would be to also demean the work of Republican Sen. Richard Lugar of Indiana, a respected foreign policy voice in the Senate. In Illinois, he was the leader on two big, contentious measures in Illinois: studying racial profiling by police and requiring recordings of interrogations in potential death penalty cases. He also successfully co-sponsored major ethics reform legislation.

PALIN: "The Democratic nominee for president supports plans to raise income taxes, raise payroll taxes, raise investment income taxes, raise the death tax, raise business taxes, and increase the tax burden on the American people by hundreds of billions of dollars."

THE FACTS: The Tax Policy Center, a think tank run jointly by the Brookings Institution and the Urban Institute, concluded that Obama's plan would increase after-tax income for middle-income taxpayers by about 5 percent by 2012, or nearly $2,200 annually. McCain's plan, which cuts taxes across all income levels, would raise after tax-income for middle-income taxpayers by 3 percent, the center concluded.

Obama would provide $80 billion in tax breaks, mainly for poor workers and the elderly, including tripling the Earned Income Tax Credit for minimum-wage workers and higher credits for larger families.

He also would raise income taxes, capital gains and dividend taxes on the wealthiest. He would raise payroll taxes on taxpayers with incomes above $250,000, and he would raise corporate taxes. Small businesses that make more than $250,000 a year would see taxes rise.

MCCAIN: "She's been governor of our largest state, in charge of 20 percent of America's energy supply ... She's responsible for 20 percent of the nation's energy supply. I'm entertained by the comparison and I hope we can keep making that comparison that running a political campaign is somehow comparable to being the executive of the largest state in America," he said in an interview with ABC News' Charles Gibson.

THE FACTS: McCain's phrasing exaggerates both claims. Palin is governor of a state that ranks second nationally in crude oil production, but she's no more "responsible" for that resource than President Bush was when he was governor of Texas, another oil-producing state. In fact, her primary power is the ability to tax oil, which she did in concert with the Alaska Legislature. And where Alaska is the largest state in America, McCain could as easily have called it the 47th largest state " by population.

MCCAIN: "She's the commander of the Alaska National Guard. ... She has been in charge, and she has had national security as one of her primary responsibilities," he said on ABC.

THE FACTS: While governors are in charge of their state guard units, that authority ends whenever those units are called to actual military service. When guard units are deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan, for example, they assume those duties under "federal status," which means they report to the Defense Department, not their governors. Alaska's national guard units have a total of about 4,200 personnel, among the smallest of state guard organizations.

FORMER ARKANSAS GOV. MIKE HUCKABEE: Palin "got more votes running for mayor of Wasilla, Alaska than Joe Biden got running for president of the United States."

THE FACTS: A whopper. Palin got 616 votes in the 1996 mayor's election, and got 909 in her 1999 re-election race, for a total of 1,525. Biden dropped out of the race after the Iowa caucuses, but he still got 76,165 votes in 23 states and the District of Columbia where he was on the ballot during the 2008 presidential primaries.

FORMER MASSACHUSETTS GOV. MITT ROMNEY: "We need change, all right " change from a liberal Washington to a conservative Washington! We have a prescription for every American who wants change in Washington " throw out the big-government liberals, and elect John McCain and Sarah Palin."

THE FACTS: A Back-to-the-Future moment. George W. Bush, a conservative Republican, has been president for nearly eight years. And until last year, Republicans controlled Congress. Only since January 2007 have Democrats have been in charge of the House and Senate.

___

Associated Press Writer Jim Drinkard in Washington contributed to this report.


source: http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080904/ap_on_el_pr/cvn_fact_check

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H2O MAN
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Sep, 2008 06:52 pm
@hamburger,
hamburger wrote:

Quote:
Re: Cycloptichorn(Post 3388559)
Uppity describes the Obama's very well, the word fits.

adj. Informal
Taking liberties or assuming airs beyond one's station; presumptuous:



i guess that means that people should not "rise above or beyond their station" - because they would be "uppity" .
(thinking - hmmmm - perhaps i might be considered uppity - i guess i'm in good company > GRIN !)
hbg


LOL , good for you and me both Laughing

However, uppity does not apply to self reliant successful folks that have risen above and beyond.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Sep, 2008 06:53 pm
That's no fair, Diest, using facts. You should be ashamed of yourself.
0 Replies
 
 

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